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85 data packages found.

Title and Description Creator (People and Organisation)
Abundance of Hollow Bearing Trees at Karawatha Forest Park, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2009
Ogden; Castley; Hero
Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University.; Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University
The abundance of hollow bearing trees (>30 cm DBH) was measured on 33 one hectare PPBio plots at Karawatha Forest Park. Tree and hollow attributes were measured for each HBT detected during these surveys. Plots were spaced at 500 m intervals, followed the elevation contour and each plot was 250 m long and 40 m wide. Tree and hollow characteristics were also measured.
  • Karawatha
  • Hollow
  • Eucalypt
  • DBH
  • PPBio
  1  
Published
2013-05-16
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
lollback.7.4

Ogden; Castley; Hero

Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University.; Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University

Acoustic Sensor, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2014
Hero
Griffith University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • Karawatha Forest Park
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-18
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.345.2

Hero

Griffith University

Acoustic Sensor, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2015
Hero
Griffith University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • Karawatha Forest Park
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2016-10-18
 
Last updated
2016-10-18
 
docid
supersite.724.2

Hero

Griffith University

Acoustic Sensor, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2016
Hero
Griffith University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • Karawatha Forest Park
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2016-10-18
 
Last updated
2016-10-18
 
docid
supersite.725.2

Hero

Griffith University

Acoustic Sensor, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2013
Grace
QUT
This data package contains continuous acoustic sensor data recorded from the 1 hectare Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Facility vegetation plot at the Samford Ecological Research Facility.
  • Acoustic Sensor Data
  • Samford Ecological Research Facility
  • TERN
  1  
Published
2014-01-06
 
Last updated
2016-10-18
 
docid
mccafferty.30.11

Grace

QUT

Acoustic Sensor, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2015
Grace
QUT
This data package contains continuous acoustic sensor data recorded from the 1 hectare Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Facility vegetation plot at the Samford Ecological Research Facility.
  • Acoustic Sensor Data
  • Samford Ecological Research Facility
  • TERN
  1  
Published
2016-10-18
 
Last updated
2016-10-18
 
docid
supersite.722.3

Grace

QUT

Acoustic Sensor, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2016
Grace
QUT
This data package contains continuous acoustic sensor data recorded from the 1 hectare Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Facility vegetation plot at the Samford Ecological Research Facility.
  • Acoustic Sensor Data
  • Samford Ecological Research Facility
  • TERN
  1  
Published
2016-10-18
 
Last updated
2016-10-18
 
docid
supersite.723.2

Grace

QUT

Ant Survey, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha, Core 1 ha, 2014
Hero
Griffith University
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected in 2014 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • Karawatha Forest
  • core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.833.1

Hero

Griffith University

Ant Survey, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha, Core 1 ha, 2015
Hero
Griffith University
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected 18-21 May 2015 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • Karawatha Forest
  • core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.834.2

Hero

Griffith University

Ant Survey, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2014
Grace
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected in 2014 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • SERF
  • SEQ
  • SEQP
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • Samford
  • core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.830.1

Grace

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Ant Survey, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2015
Grace
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected in Apr and Nov 2015 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • SERF
  • SEQ
  • SEQP
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • Samford
  • core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.831.2

Grace

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Ant Survey, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2016
Grace
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected in Apr and Nov 2016 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • SERF
  • SEQ
  • SEQP
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • Samford
  • core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.832.2

Grace

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

BASE Contextual, Soil Physico-Chemical Data, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, Core 1 ha, 2013
Hero
Griffith University
Soil collection and analysis of chemical and physical attributes was carried out to provide contextual data for the Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) soil microbial diversity project (http://www.bioplatforms.com/soil-biodiversity/). Nine discrete soil samples from a 25 m x 25 m quadrat, sampled at two depth ranges (0 – 10cm and 20 – 30cm). Eight samples were taken at the corners and mid-points of the 25 m x 25m sides of the quadrat, with sample taken at the centre. The nine subsamples were combined for each depth, to return a single surface and deeper soil sample per quadrat. Samples for chemical and physical analysis were air-dried and transported to CSBP laboratories, Perth, Australia.
  • soil
  • physico-chemical
  • chemistry
  • core 1 ha
  • SEQP
  • SEQ Peri-urban SuperSite
  • Karawatha Forest
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-12-06
 
Last updated
2015-12-06
 
docid
supersite.395.3

Hero

Griffith University

BASE Contextual, Soil Physico-Chemical Data, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2013
Grace
QUT
Soil collection and analysis of chemical and physical attributes was carried out to provide contextual data for the Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) soil microbial diversity project (http://www.bioplatforms.com/soil-biodiversity/). Nine discrete soil samples from a 25 m x 25 m quadrat, sampled at two depth ranges (0 – 10cm and 20 – 30cm). Eight samples were taken at the corners and mid-points of the 25 m x 25m sides of the quadrat, with sample taken at the centre. The nine subsamples were combined for each depth, to return a single surface and deeper soil sample per quadrat. Samples for chemical and physical analysis were air-dried and transported to CSBP laboratories, Perth, Australia.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0503
  • soil
  • physico-chemical
  • chemistry
  • core 1 ha
  • SEQP
  • SEQ Peri-urban SuperSite
  • Samford
  • pasture
  • lawn
  3  
Published
2015-12-06
 
Last updated
2015-12-06
 
docid
supersite.397.6

Grace

QUT

Bird Survey Data, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2007-2008
Hero; Hughes; Castley
Environmental Futures Research Institute
Bird surveys for 33 one-hectare plots in Karawatha Forest Park. The plots are at 500 m intervals in a grid that covers the entire Park. Each plot follows the elevational contour and is 250 m long x 40 m wide. Five repeat surveys were completed during the period August 2007 to January 2008.
  • bird communities
  • avian assemblages
  • Karawatha Forest
  • fauna
  • 0502
  1  
Published
2015-12-13
 
Last updated
2015-12-13
 
docid
supersite.490.2

Hero; Hughes; Castley

Environmental Futures Research Institute

Bird Survey Data, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2012
Le Pla; Lollback
Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University
Bird surveys for 32 one-hectare plots in Karawatha Forest Park. The plots are at 500 m intervals in a grid that covers the entire Park. Each plot follows the elevational contour and is 250 m long x 40 m wide. Three repeat surveys were completed during the period May 2012 to August 2012.
  • Bird communities
  • Floristic
  • Habitat structure
  • Avian assemblages
  • Karawatha
  • Composition
  • Fauna
  1  
Published
2013-05-08
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
lollback.3.8

Le Pla; Lollback

Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University

Bird Survey Data, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2015
Hero; Lollback
Griffith University
Bird surveys were undertaken within the 1 hectare core plot at the Karawatha Forest node of the South-East Queensland Peri-Urban Supersite (-27.63°, 153.08°). One survey was conducted in early February and the second was conducted in early May, 2015. Each general-search survey lasted 20 minutes with the single observer detecting bird species by call and sight within the 100 x 100 m plot. Surveys commenced within 1.5 hours after dawn.
  • 0608
  • South-East Queensland Peri-Urban Supersite
  • Karawatha Forest
  • bird
  1  
Published
2015-07-10
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.167.3

Hero; Lollback

Griffith University

Bird Survey Data, South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2013-2014
Grace; Tucker; Wells
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; Birdlife Southern Queensland
Bird surveys were conducted within the 1 hectare SEQ Peri-urban SuperSite on 14 separate days between October 2013 and November 2014. Area search methodology was used for all surveys based on protocols described by Antos et al. (2008). Area searches involved searching a set route for a minimum of one hour, recording all species seen and numbers of those species, including species flying over if they have the potential to use the property, and recording weather conditions such as wind direction and strength, cloud cover and rainfall. Area searches are typically conducted over plots of approximately 1 to 3 hectares. Area searches are easily applied and flexible with regard to observer movement for observation and the shape of sample area, and are less sensitive to biases related to environmental variation such as weather and time of day.
  • SEQP
  • bird survey
  • avian species
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQ Peri-urban
  • 0602
  14  
Published
2015-01-31
 
Last updated
2015-12-14
 
docid
tucker.28.17

Grace; Tucker; Wells

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; Birdlife Southern Queensland

Bird Survey Data, South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2015
Grace
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Bird surveys were conducted within the 1 hectare SEQ Peri-urban SuperSite on 8 separate days between February and September 2015. Area search methodology was used for all surveys based on protocols described by Antos et al. (2008). Area searches involved searching a set route for a minimum of one hour, recording all species seen and numbers of those species, including species flying over if they have the potential to use the property, and recording weather conditions such as wind direction and strength, cloud cover and rainfall. Area searches are typically conducted over plots of approximately 1 to 3 hectares. Area searches are easily applied and flexible with regard to observer movement for observation and the shape of sample area, and are less sensitive to biases related to environmental variation such as weather and time of day.
  • 0602
  • SEQP
  • bird survey
  • avian species
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQ Peri-urban
  11  
Published
2015-10-14
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.266.10

Grace

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Bird Survey Data, South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2016
Grace
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Bird surveys were conducted within the 1 hectare SEQ Peri-urban SuperSite on five separate days between January and December 2016. Area search methodology was used for all surveys based on protocols described by Antos et al. (2008). Area searches involved searching a set route for a minimum of one hour, recording all species seen and numbers of those species, including species flying over if they have the potential to use the property, and recording weather conditions such as wind direction and strength, cloud cover and rainfall. Area searches are typically conducted over plots of approximately 1 to 3 hectares. Area searches are easily applied and flexible with regard to observer movement for observation and the shape of sample area, and are less sensitive to biases related to environmental variation such as weather and time of day. Antos, M., Magrath, M., Olsen, P., & Weston, M. (updated by Herrod A.)(2010). Survey guidelines for Australia’s threatened birds: Guidelines for detecting birds listed as threatened under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, Commonwealth of Australia. Available: http://www.environment.gov.au/system/files/resources/107052eb-2041-45b9-9296-b5f514493ae0/files/survey-guidelines-birds.pdf
  • 0602
  • SEQP
  • bird survey
  • avian species
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQ Peri-urban
  5  
Published
2017-01-12
 
Last updated
2017-01-13
 
docid
supersite.767.5

Grace

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Bird Survey Data, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford 2013
Wells
QUT
This package contains data from a two hectare Atlas bird survey of Samford Ecological Research Facility on the 27th October 2013
  • avian survey
  • Samford Ecological Research Facility
  • TERN
  1  
Published
2014-08-29
 
Last updated
2015-01-06
 
docid
datalibrarian.171.4

Wells

QUT

Bird Survey Data Using Three Methods, Karawatha Forest Park, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2012
Davies; Hero
Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University
Bird composition surveyed at 32 PPBio plots by using three survey methods at Karawatha Forest Park. The methods used were: expert ornithologist, citizen scientists and acoustic recorders. All three methods were used at each plot and the sampling methods were performed concurrently. Each plot follows the elevation contour and is 250 m long x 80 m wide. The starting point of plots are spaced 500 m apart. Surveys were undertaken between May and August 2012. Surveys conducted by the ornithologist and citizen scientists were 20 min long and took place within the first three hours of sunrise. Each plot was surveyed twice by the ornithologist and the citizen scientists (n = 128). A total of eight citizen observers were used in this study, with each observer surveying a minimum of five plots. Multiple observers were present on each plot at any one time to increase safety, but were spaced temporally so as to reduce the influence of the other observer(s). The acoustic recorders were developed by Dr Paul Roe and Jason Wimmer from the Queensland University of Technology (QUT). The recorders comprise of an Olympus DM-420 digital voice recorder (recording at 44.1 kHz 128 kbps, and between 40-17,000 Hz) with an external battery power source (Duracell D-cell batteries) enclosed within a waterproof, lockable casing, with an external stereo-microphone array. All recordings were in mp3 format. At each plot one recorder was placed at the base of the closest small tree 5m to the left-hand or right-hand side of the 125m mark of the transect midline. The recorder was buried in a shallow hole (no deeper than 25cm) and covered with dirt and surrounding leaf litter for camouflage to prevent tampering/theft, with the stereo microphones attached to the box being secured to the adjacent tree and elevated from the ground. During each two week period the recorders were set to record every morning for two hours, with all recordings being within the period till three hours after dawn. Twenty-eight hours of recordings were obtained for each plot (896 hours total for the study).
  • Acoustic recorder
  • PPBio
  • Karawatha
  • Avian
  • Eucalypt
  • Citizen scientist
  • Expert
  0  
Published
2013-05-17
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
lollback.9.3

Davies; Hero

Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University

Capturing Soil Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Microbial Origin, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2009-2010
Larsen; Grace; Smith
Institute for Sustainable Resources, Queensland University of Technology; Institute of Sustainable Resources, Queensland University of Technology; Queensland University of Technology
In Australia there is an increasing wealth of information on greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural environments but there is limited research on greenhouse gas emissions from natural/native forest ecosystems. Most greenhouse gas field studies are undertaken in agricultural systems under Nitrogen fertilization, representing an expanding source of N2O (Neftel, Flechard et al. 2007). In contrast, tropical rainforest is a significant sink of atmospheric CH4 (Kiese, Hewett et al. 2003), however, there is little information available on subtropical ecosystems. At SERF (Samford Ecological Research Facility) there is a unique subtropical research setting whereby small-scale ecosystems representing land-use change are present side by side. Studies on greenhouse gas emissions and studies on microbial community structure in relation to soil and vegetation parameters are currently mutually exclusive. There is little data on seasonal change in microbial community composition to support chemical flux measurements (Kiese, Hewett et al. 2003; Kulmala, Launiainen et al. 2008). How greatly does the bacterial community composition vary between sites and can it be related to greenhouse gas emissions? Do intensively farmed soils still have the capacity to regain functional physicochemistry and biology (Bardgett & Shine 1999, Loiseau et al 1995, Balesdent et al 1996)? The first aim of this scoping study will be to measure soil greenhouse gas emissions from native forest and adjacent land that has been cleared for pasture. The second aim will be to relate these emissions to microbial community analysis using molecular methods. Data includes Greenhouse Gas fluxes, rainfall, soil physicochemical parameters: pH, temperature, %VWC (Volumetric Water Content), nitrate/ammonia, bulk density, also photos Also have frozen soil samples, DNA extracted from soils, method/reagents for methanotroph PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Also have data for one bench exept which compared Greenhouse Gas fluxes from wetted pasture, forest, tilled, grazed soil cores.
  • Greenhouse gas
  • Soil
  • Bacteria
  • Methane
  • Carbon dioxide
  • CO2
  • Nitrous Oxide
  • N2O
  • Forest
  • Pasture
  • Land use
  • 0605
  0  
Published
2011-03-28
 
Last updated
2014-12-01
 
docid
fahmi.32.16

Larsen; Grace; Smith

Institute for Sustainable Resources, Queensland University of Technology; Institute of Sustainable Resources, Queensland University of Technology; Queensland University of Technology

Coarse Woody Debris, South-East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, 2015
Grace; Tucker
QUT; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
A plot-based assessment for coarse woody debris was conducted. Measurements of diameter 1 (except where standing dead stems < 1.5 m), diameter 2, length of piece, current state of CWD and degree of decay were recorded for each 20 m x 20 m subplot (numbered 1 to 25).
  • SEQP
  • coarse woody debris
  • cwd
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • South East Queensland Peri-Urban
  • 0502
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2015-12-07
 
Last updated
2015-12-08
 
docid
supersite.424.5

Grace; Tucker

QUT; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Coarse Woody Debris, South-East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, 2016
Grace; Tucker
QUT; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
A plot-based assessment for coarse woody debris was conducted. Measurements of diameter 1 (except where standing dead stems < 1.5 m), diameter 2, length of piece, current state of CWD and degree of decay were recorded for each 20 m x 20 m subplot (numbered 1 to 25).
  • SEQP
  • coarse woody debris
  • cwd
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • South East Queensland Peri-Urban
  • 0502
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2017-01-19
 
Last updated
2017-01-19
 
docid
supersite.773.3

Grace; Tucker

QUT; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Coarse Woody Debris Data, South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2014
Grace; Tucker
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
A plot-based assessment for coarse woody debris was conducted. Measurements of diameter 1 (except where standing dead stems < 1.5 m), diameter 2, length of piece, current state of CWD and degree of decay were recorded for each 20 m x 20 m subplot (numbered 1 to 25).
  • 0602
  • SEQP
  • coarse woody debris
  • CWD
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQ Peri-Urban
  1  
Published
2015-01-19
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
tucker.5.21

Grace; Tucker

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Ecosystem Water Use: Influence of Vegetation Type and Topography, South East Queensland Peri-Urban Supersite, Samford, 2011-2013
Rowlings; Van Dam; Labadz
QUT
Since January 2011, soil water use from each vegetation community has been monitored using a combination of high temporal resolution automatic and manually sampled soil moisture probes. Using the high definition LIDAR derived digital elevation model, a number of permanent transects within each community of the SERF property were identified. These transects were orientated towards the slope aspect, allowing flows to be traced down the sub-catchment slopes and into the riparian zones and the creek system. Transects were located to ensure the maximum coverage of the different vegetation community types. Each transect encompassed only a single vegetation community, with the exception of the riparian vegetation which included the lowest monitoring point on several transects to link with stream water data. Each transect contained at least 3 soil water monitoring sites, encompassing the upslope, mid-slope and lower slope areas. High resolution soil moisture data is measured using 19 FDR probes (Sentek Solo, Odyssey GLRL) logged at 30 minute intervals. Each probe contains 4-5 sensors, allowing specified depths/horizons of the soil profile to be continuously monitored. At least one transect per land use consists solely of automated sensors allowing soil water movement down the slope profile to be monitored. The high resolution data is replicated on the remaining transects with soil profiles measured manually on a weekly basis using a portable soil water profiler (Diviner 2000, Sentek).
  • Soil water content
  • Vegetation communities
  • water use efficiency
  20  
Published
2014-01-29
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
mccafferty.34.28

Rowlings; Van Dam; Labadz

QUT

Ecosystem Water Use: Influence of Vegetation Type and Topography, South East Queensland Peri-Urban Supersite, Samford, 2014
Rowlings; Van Dam; Labadz
QUT
Since January 2011, soil water use from each vegetation community has been monitored using a combination of high temporal resolution automatic and manually sampled soil moisture probes. Using the high definition LIDAR derived digital elevation model, a number of permanent transects within each community of the SERF property were identified. These transects were orientated towards the slope aspect, allowing flows to be traced down the sub-catchment slopes and into the riparian zones and the creek system. Transects were located to ensure the maximum coverage of the different vegetation community types. Each transect encompassed only a single vegetation community, with the exception of the riparian vegetation which included the lowest monitoring point on several transects to link with stream water data. Each transect contained at least 3 soil water monitoring sites, encompassing the upslope, mid-slope and lower slope areas. High resolution soil moisture data is measured using 19 FDR probes (Sentek Solo, Odyssey GLRL) logged at 30 minute intervals. Each probe contains 4-5 sensors, allowing specified depths/horizons of the soil profile to be continuously monitored. At least one transect per land use consists solely of automated sensors allowing soil water movement down the slope profile to be monitored. The high resolution data is replicated on the remaining transects with soil profiles measured manually on a weekly basis using a portable soil water profiler (Diviner 2000, Sentek).
  • Soil water content
  • Vegetation communities
  • water use efficiency
  32  
Published
2014-08-29
 
Last updated
2015-11-01
 
docid
datalibrarian.137.12

Rowlings; Van Dam; Labadz

QUT

Estuarine Productivity, Logan and Albert Rivers, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, 2009-2011
Steven
CSIRO
Albert river and Logan river water quality data. Live and historical data available at ftp://ftp.csiro.au/LoganRiver/index.htm
  • Logan river
  • Albert river
  • Water quality
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2011-03-24
 
Last updated
2014-12-01
 
docid
fahmi.30.12

Steven

CSIRO

Fire History for Long-Term Research Sites in Karawatha Forest Park, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2000-2006
Butler; Hero
Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University
Annual fire history of 33 one-hectare plots in Karawatha Forest Park for the years 2000 to 2006. The plots are at 500 m intervals in a grid that covers the entire Park. Each plot follows the elevational contour and is 250 m long x 40 m wide.
  • bush fire history
  • Karawatha Forest
  • habitat characteristics
  • vegetation
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2011-10-31
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
shuker.21.9

Butler; Hero

Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University

Fruit Phenology, South East Queensland Peri-Urban Supersite, Samford, 2015
Grace; Tucker
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Three 100 m x 5 m transects were established within the 1 hectare plot at 20E0N to 20E100N, 40E0N to 40E100N and 60E0N to 60E100N (coordinates marked the western boundary of each transect). Estimates of flowering and fruiting were made within each transect for tree, shrub and ground layers.
  • phenology
  • SEQP
  • Samford
  • 0705
  2  
Published
2015-07-21
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.172.3

Grace; Tucker

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Fruit Phenology, South East Queensland Peri-Urban Supersite, Samford, 2016
Grace; Tucker
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Three 100 m x 5 m transects were established within the 1 hectare plot at 20E0N to 20E100N, 40E0N to 40E100N and 60E0N to 60E100N (coordinates marked the western boundary of each transect). Estimates of flowering and fruiting were made within each transect for tree, shrub and ground layers. Exact counts of flowers and fruit were made where possible. Where this was not possible, estimates were made.
  • phenology
  • SEQP
  • Samford
  • 0705
  4  
Published
2016-04-12
 
Last updated
2016-09-18
 
docid
supersite.647.8

Grace; Tucker

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Habitat Structure in Karawatha Forest Park, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2007-2008
Kampmann; Hero
Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University
Canopy cover and ground cover estimates for 33 one-hectare plots in Karawatha Forest Park. The plots are at 500 m intervals in a grid that covers the entire Park. Each plot follows the elevational contour and is 250 m long x 40 m wide. Canopy cover was measured using photographs taken at 50 m intervals along the 250 m mid-line of the plot. Ground cover was measured using the point-intercept method at 2 m intervals along the mid-line. Surveys were completed during the period October 2007 to February 2008.
  • canopy cover
  • ground cover
  • habitat structure
  • habitat characteristics
  • vegetation characteristics
  • habitat composition
  • 0602
  2  
Published
2011-10-31
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
shuker.27.9

Kampmann; Hero

Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University

Koala survey at Karawatha Forest Park, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2009-2010
Mossaz; Castley; Hero
Environmental Futures Centre; Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University
Surveys of koala activity for 33 one-hectare plots in Karawatha Forest Park during the period October 2009 to January 2010. The plots are at 500 m intervals in a grid that covers the entire Park. Each plot follows the elevational contour and is 250 m long x 40 m wide. Koala activity was determined from scat surveys using the Spot Assessment Technique.
  • fauna
  • koala
  • spot assessment technique
  • scat
  • pellet
  • population estimate
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2011-10-31
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
shuker.24.9

Mossaz; Castley; Hero

Environmental Futures Centre; Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University

Leaf Area Index Data, South-East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2014
Rowlings; Grace
Principal Investigator; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Canopy leaf area index data were collected by David Tucker using digital cover photography (DCP) for the South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite Samford. Nine transects were established within the one hectare plot. A Nikon D5200 single-lens reflex camera and AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55 mmf/3.5-5.6G VR lens was used for recording all images. Camera settings Included ISO200, f8.0, exposure -1.0 and RAW format. Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange (Bréda, 2003). Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns (Walker et al. 1981). These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and as a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as DCP (digital cover photography) and DHP (digital hemispheric photography). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) is recommended for medium stature (10-40 m) vegetation with simple structure. DCP was originally developed for sparse to moderately dense broadleaf forest and has also been tested in sparse savanna woodland. DCP is recommended for these vegetation types and has also been suggested for more dense forests (Pekin and MacFarlane 2009). Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP) is recommended for short vegetation (4-8 m) e.g. low banksia woodland, complex (multi strata) and tall vegetation (> 40+ m) using images taken 20 m apart (MacFarlane et al. 2007).
  • LAI
  • leaf area index
  • digital cover photography
  • SEQP
  • Samford
  • 0502
  1  
Published
2015-11-05
 
Last updated
2016-09-12
 
docid
supersite.288.3

Rowlings; Grace

Principal Investigator; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Leaf Area Index Data, South-East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2015
Rowlings; Grace
Principal Investigator; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Canopy leaf area index data were collected by David Tucker using digital cover photography (DCP) for the South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite Samford. Nine transects were established within the one hectare plot. A Nikon D5200 single-lens reflex camera and AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55 mmf/3.5-5.6G VR lens was used for recording all images. Camera settings Included ISO200, f8.0, exposure -1.0 and RAW format. Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange (Bréda, 2003). Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns (Walker et al. 1981). These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and as a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as DCP (digital cover photography) and DHP (digital hemispheric photography). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) is recommended for medium stature (10-40 m) vegetation with simple structure. DCP was originally developed for sparse to moderately dense broadleaf forest and has also been tested in sparse savanna woodland. DCP is recommended for these vegetation types and has also been suggested for more dense forests (Pekin and MacFarlane 2009). Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP) is recommended for short vegetation (4-8 m) e.g. low banksia woodland, complex (multi strata) and tall vegetation (> 40+ m) using images taken 20 m apart (MacFarlane et al. 2007).
  • LAI
  • leaf area index
  • digital cover photography
  • SEQP
  • Samford
  • 0502
  3  
Published
2015-11-05
 
Last updated
2016-10-27
 
docid
supersite.284.6

Rowlings; Grace

Principal Investigator; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Leaf Area Index Data, South-East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2016
Rowlings; Grace
Principal Investigator; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography was carried out at the South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha plot on Jan 19, 31 May, 23 Aug, 15 Nov 2016. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/seqp_samford/default
  • LAI
  • leaf area index
  • digital cover photography
  • SEQP
  • Samford
  • 0502
  4  
Published
2016-12-10
 
Last updated
2016-12-10
 
docid
supersite.757.2

Rowlings; Grace

Principal Investigator; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Leaf Area Index Images, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha, Core 1 ha, 2015
Hero
Griffith University
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha, Core 1 ha plot on 19 May 2015. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/seqp_karawatha/default
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • SEQ
  • Karawatha
  • Leaf Area Index Images
  • Core 1 ha
  • Digital Camera Photography
  1  
Published
2016-12-05
 
Last updated
2016-12-06
 
docid
supersite.750.5

Hero

Griffith University

Leaf Area Index Images, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha, Core 1 ha, 2016
Hero
Griffith University
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha, Core 1 ha plot on 08 Feb 2016. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/seqp_karawatha/default
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • SEQ
  • Karawatha
  • Leaf Area Index Images
  • Core 1 ha
  • Digital Camera Photography
  1  
Published
2016-12-06
 
Last updated
2016-12-06
 
docid
supersite.751.2

Hero

Griffith University

Leaf Area Index Images, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2014
Grace
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography was carried out at the South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha plot on 11 Nov 2014 Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/seqp_samford/default
  • 0607
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • SEQ
  • SERF
  • SEQP
  • Samford
  • Leaf Area Index Images
  • Core 1 ha
  • Digital Cover Photography
  • LAI
  • 0501
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2016-12-06
 
Last updated
2016-12-06
 
docid
supersite.752.2

Grace

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Leaf Area Index Images, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2015
Grace
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography was carried out at the South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha plot on May 12, 7 July, 20 Oct , 5 Dec 2015 Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/seqp_samford/default
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • SEQ
  • SERF
  • SEQP
  • Samford
  • Leaf Area Index Images
  • Core 1 ha
  • Digital Cover Photography
  • LAI
  1  
Published
2016-12-06
 
Last updated
2017-01-09
 
docid
supersite.753.4

Grace

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Leaf Area Index Images, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2016
Grace
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography was carried out at the South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha plot on Jan 19, 31 May, 23 Aug, 15 Nov 2016. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/seqp_samford/default
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • SEQ
  • SERF
  • SEQP
  • Samford
  • Leaf Area Index Images
  • Core 1 ha
  • Digital Cover Photography
  • LAI
  1  
Published
2016-12-06
 
Last updated
2016-12-10
 
docid
supersite.754.3

Grace

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Litter fall from dry sclerophyll forest, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2011-2013
Rowlings; Van Dam; Labadz
QUT
Litter fall was collected at roughly monthly intervals from a subtropical dry sclerophyll eucalypt forest on the Samford Ecological Research station. The data collected formed part of a larger study examining the carbon and nitrogen dynamics of the forest system. Complementary datasets include high resolution greenhouse gas (N2O, CH4 and CO2), water contents and NPP measurements.
  • Litter fall
  • Dry sclerophyll forest
  • Eucalypt
  1  
Published
2014-02-11
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
mccafferty.66.6

Rowlings; Van Dam; Labadz

QUT

Lizard Assemblage in Karawatha Forest Park, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2007-2008
Kampmann; Hero
Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University
Lizard assemblage for 33 one-hectare plots at Karawatha Forest, determined from pitfall trapping and visual encounter surveys. The plots are at 500 m intervals in a grid that covers the entire Park. Each plot follows the elevational contour and is 250 m long x 40 m wide. Three repeat surveys were completed during the period September 2007 to February 2008.
  • fauna
  • reptiles
  • lizard species
  • pitfall trap
  • Karawatha Forest
  • 0602
  2  
Published
2011-10-27
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
shuker.19.13

Kampmann; Hero

Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University

Mammal Captures at Karawatha Forest Park, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2010
Castley; Hero; Ogston
Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University
The aims of the Honours project were: to investigate the distribution of small ground-dwelling mammals at Karawatha; study the relationship between small ground-dwelling mammals and habitat features at the micro and macro scales; determine the influence of trapping technique on the composition of captured mammals. Sampling of small mammals using Elliot traps, pitfall traps and hair funnels. Sampling occurred on 33 PPBio plots (250 m long) between June and August 2010. Each plot was sampled for four nights, with three to four plots being surveyed simultaneously. Twenty-five Elliot traps, three pitfall traps and six hair funnels were used per plot. Elliot traps were placed 11 m perpendicular to the midline on each side and at 20 metre intervals, starting at 20 m along the transect. A final Elliot trap was placed on the line at the 250 m mark. Elliot traps were baited with balls that consisted of a mixture of honey, peanut butter and rolled oats. One pitfall traps were placed 5 m from the midline at the 125 m mark on the left hand side. The pitfall traps consisted of a 20 L bucket and 10 m of drift fence. The hair funnel traps were placed every 35 m along the transect on alternate sides and 6 m from the midline.
  • Mammal
  • Trapping
  • Karawatha
  • PPBio
  • Habitat
  • Scale
  1  
Published
2013-05-10
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
lollback.5.5

Castley; Hero; Ogston

Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University

Mid stratum assessment, South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2012
Grace; Tucker; Bradford
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; CSIRO, Tropical Forest Research Centre
Six Gentry transects were established within the 1 hectare plot. All woody plant species >1.5 m high, with a DBH >1 cm and <10 cm, and within 1 m either side of the transect line were measured. DBH, height and crown area were recorded for each identified plant species.
  • SEQP
  • mid stratum assessment
  • Gentry transects
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQ Peri-Urban
  1  
Published
2015-04-20
 
Last updated
2015-07-14
 
docid
tucker.52.5

Grace; Tucker; Bradford

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; CSIRO, Tropical Forest Research Centre

Net Primary Production from a Subtropical Pasture, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2011-2013
Rowlings; Van Dam; Labadz
QUT
Pasture growth was estimated by taking biomass cuts at roughly monthly intervals from a subtropical pasture at the location of the eddy covariance tower on the Samford Ecological Research station. The pasture was dominated by paspalum dilalatum and several native species. Cuts were taken at 4 random locations of the 5 ha pasture and separated into live and dead components and analysed for dry matter production.
  • NPP
  • Net Primary Productivity
  • Pasture
  • subtropical
  2  
Published
2014-02-06
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
mccafferty.63.7

Rowlings; Van Dam; Labadz

QUT

Photopoint Images, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha, Core 1 ha, 2015
Hero
Griffith University
Photopoint images were collected 19 Feb 2015 at each corner and centre of the South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha, Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/seqp_karawatha/default
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • SEQP
  • SEQ
  • Karawatha Forest
  • Core 1 ha
  • Photography
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.794.3

Hero

Griffith University

Photopoint Images, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha, Core 1 ha, 2016
Hero
Griffith University
Photopoint images were collected 9 June 2016 at each corner and centre of the South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha, Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/seqp_karawatha/default
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • SEQP
  • SEQ
  • Karawatha Forest
  • Core 1 ha
  • Photography
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.795.2

Hero

Griffith University

Photopoint Images, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2012
Grace
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Photopoint images were collected in Aug 2012 at each corner and centre of the South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/seqp_samford/default
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • SEQ
  • SERF
  • SEQP
  • Samford
  • Core 1 ha
  • Photography
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.790.3

Grace

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Photopoint Images, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2014
Grace
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Photopoint images were collected 11 Nov 2014 at each corner and centre of the South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/seqp_samford/default
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • SEQ
  • SERF
  • SEQP
  • Samford
  • Core 1 ha
  • Photography
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.791.2

Grace

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Photopoint Images, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2015
Grace
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Photopoint images were collected 19 Apr and 31 May 2015 at each corner and centre of the South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/seqp_samford/default
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • SEQ
  • SERF
  • SEQP
  • Samford
  • Core 1 ha
  • Photography
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.792.2

Grace

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Photopoint Images, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2016
Grace
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Photopoint images were collected 18 Jan 2016 at each corner and centre of the South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/seqp_samford/default
  • South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite
  • SEQ
  • SERF
  • SEQP
  • Samford
  • Core 1 ha
  • Photography
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.793.2

Grace

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Remote Sensing of the Soundscape at the Samford Ecological Research Facility, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2010-2011
Gage; Grace; Roe; Wimmer; Gane
Michigan State University; Queensland University of Technology
The Samford Ecological Research Facility (SERF) provides a unique opportunity to investigate the role of sensors as a means to characterize ecological change. SERF is located in the Samford Valley, west of Brisbane, Australia. The Samford Valley has been transformed from forest land to an agronomic system (banana plantations, dairy, horse farms) and recently to a low to moderate density urban system. SERF is centered in a 50 ha mix of native forest and old field succession. Stuart Gage, Adjunct Professor at Queensland University of Technology (QUT), is conducting research on acoustic sensing of the environment in collaboration with QUT scientists Peter Grace and Paul Roe and PhD Student Jason Wimmer. The deployment of acoustic sensor platforms at SERF will enable us to understand the role of acoustics to determine ecosystem quality and biodiversity. Cyber-infrastructure has been developed to place the recordings in the REAL Digital Library and process the observations. The REAL website provides browse and search accessibility to the recordings, their spectrograms and the data table created via automated processing (see http://www.real.msu.edu). The data is available at QUT's Bioacoustic Workbench site http://baw.ecosounds.org/
  • Samford
  • Acoustics
  • Environmental Health
  • Sensor network
  • 0502
  0  
Published
2011-03-21
 
Last updated
2014-12-01
 
docid
fahmi.23.11

Gage; Grace; Roe; Wimmer; Gane

Michigan State University; Queensland University of Technology

Samford_Stream Physico-Chemical Data, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2011-2014
Grace
Institute for Sustainable Resources
Two water quality stations on Samford Creek are installed at either end of the Samford Ecological Research Facility (SERF). The main station measures turbidity, conductivity, pH, water depth, dissolved oxygen and flow. The stations collect data every 10 minutes for the total duration of the experiment of 10 years. The data will be used to evaluate stream flow and nutrient losses at SERF using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) a catchment-scale, water quality model. SWAT operates on a daily time step and will be able to perform long-term simulations using the data collected from the Supersite project.
  • Water quality
  • Samford
  • SWAT model
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2011-03-28
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
fahmi.31.12

Grace

Institute for Sustainable Resources

Site and Soil Characterisation, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2013
Rowlings; Gane; Grace
Queensland University of Technology
Soil characteristics of the Samford Ecological research Stations core 1 ha vegetation site.
  • soil characterisation
  • soil
  • SEQP
  • Samford
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2016-04-21
 
Last updated
2016-04-21
 
docid
supersite.650.2

Rowlings; Gane; Grace

Queensland University of Technology

Soil Characterisation (Physical and Chemical) in Karawatha Forest Park, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2007
Butler; Simpkins; Hero
Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University
Physical and chemical soil characteristics for 33 one-hectare plots in Karawatha Forest Park. The plots are at 500 m intervals in a grid that covers the entire Park. Each plot follows the elevational contour and is 250 m long x 40 m wide. Within each plot, soil samples were taken at a depth of 10cm at six points (0, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250m) along the plot midline. Samples were collected during 2007.
  • soil physical structure
  • soil
  • soil chemistry
  • soil characteristics
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2011-10-25
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
shuker.13.11

Butler; Simpkins; Hero

Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University

Stream Daily Average Physico-Chemical and Flow Data, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 201101-201204
Labadz
QUT ISR
Physico-chemical parameters of the surface water from two permanent sampling sites on the Samford Creek, southeast Queensland, Australia, are determined. The parameters include temperature, pH, turbidity, dissolved oxygen and conductivity. In addition, a velocity Doppler measures flow rate and creek height at these two locations. This data is collected continuously and averaged over 10-minute intervals to investigate the effects of land use change, in particular urbanisation, on the aquatic system in a peri-urban environment. hown here are daily averages of the 10-minute data. Further, the data will be used to validate a catchment hydrological model of the area using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which will simulate the effects of different land use scenarios on the catchment water balance and nutrient fluxes.
  • Physico-chemistry
  • Surface water
  • Urbanisation
  • Peri-urban
  • Land use change
  4  
Published
2013-11-22
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
labadz.71.6

Labadz

QUT ISR

Stream Daily Average Physico-Chemical and Flow Data, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2012
Labadz
IFE, HEEM, QUT
Physico-chemical parameters of the surface water from two permanent sampling sites on the Samford Creek, southeast Queensland, Australia, are determined. The parameters include temperature, pH, turbidity, dissolved oxygen and conductivity. In addition, a velocity Doppler measures flow rate and creek height at these two locations. This data is collected continuously and averaged over 10-minute intervals to investigate the effects of land use change, in particular urbanisation, on the aquatic system in a peri-urban environment. hown here are daily averages of the 10-minute data. Further, the data will be used to validate a catchment hydrological model of the area using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which will simulate the effects of different land use scenarios on the catchment water balance and nutrient fluxes.
  • Physico-chemistry
  • Surface water
  • Urbanisation
  • Peri-urban
  • Land use changes
  7  
Published
2014-01-10
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
labadz.84.11

Labadz

IFE, HEEM, QUT

Stream Physico-Chemical Data, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 201109-201304
Labadz
IFE, Queensland University of Technology
Water quality parameters of the surface water from two permanent sampling sites on the Samford Creek, southeast Queensland, Australia, are determined. The parameters include major cations and anions, plus total inorganic and organic nitrogen and phosphorus. This data is sampled to investigate the effects of land use change, in particular urbanisation, on the aquatic system in a peri-urban environment. Further, the data will be used to validate a catchment hydrological model of the area using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which will simulate the effects of different land use scenarios on the catchment water balance and nutrient fluxes.
  • Surface water
  • Urbanisation
  • Peri-urban
  • Land use change
  • Major ions
  • Water chemistry
  • Nutrients
  • Nitrogen
  • Phosphorus
  2  
Published
2013-11-22
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
labadz.75.6

Labadz

IFE, Queensland University of Technology

Stream Physico-Chemical Data, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 201210-201302
Labadz
QUT. IFE
Physico-chemical parameters of the surface water from two permanent sampling sites on the Samford Creek, southeast Queensland, Australia, are determined. The parameters include temperature, pH, turbidity, dissolved oxygen and conductivity. In addition, a velocity Doppler measures flow rate and creek height at these two locations. This data is collected continuously and averaged over 10-minute intervals to investigate the effects of land use change, in particular urbanisation, on the aquatic system in a peri-urban environment. hown here are daily averages of the 10-minute data. Further, the data will be used to validate a catchment hydrological model of the area using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which will simulate the effects of different land use scenarios on the catchment water balance and nutrient fluxes.
  • Peri-urban
  • Physico-chemistry
  • Surface water
  • Urbanisation
  • Land use change
  3  
Published
2014-01-09
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
labadz.83.8

Labadz

QUT. IFE

Stream Physico-Chemical Data, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2013
Labadz
IFE, Queensland University of Technology
Physico-chemical parameters of the surface water from two permanent sampling sites on the Samford Creek, southeast Queensland, Australia, are determined. The parameters include temperature, pH, turbidity, dissolved oxygen and conductivity. In addition, a velocity Doppler measures flow rate and creek height at these two locations. This data is collected continuously and averaged over 10-minute intervals to investigate the effects of land use change, in particular urbanisation, on the aquatic system in a peri-urban environment. hown here are daily averages of the 10-minute data. Further, the data will be used to validate a catchment hydrological model of the area using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which will simulate the effects of different land use scenarios on the catchment water balance and nutrient fluxes.
  • Physico-chemistry
  • Surface water
  • Urbanisation
  • Peri-urban
  • Land use change
  8  
Published
2013-11-22
 
Last updated
2016-10-12
 
docid
labadz.76.13

Labadz

IFE, Queensland University of Technology

Subordinate stratum assessment, South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2012
Grace; Tucker; Bradford
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; CSIRO
Six Gentry transects were established within the 1 hectare plot. Ten 1 m x 1 m quadrats were established at 5 m intervals along each transect. The total projected cover of plants <1.5 m and >10 cm high with a DBH <1.0 cm (grasses, herbs and woody plants) was estimated, as was the projective cover of dominant grasses, herbs and woody plants.
  • SEQP
  • subordinate stratum assessment
  • Gentry quadrats
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQ Peri-Urban
  1  
Published
2015-04-20
 
Last updated
2015-12-14
 
docid
tucker.54.7

Grace; Tucker; Bradford

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; CSIRO

Topographic Characteristics of Plots in Karawatha Forest Park, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2007
Butler; Hero; Castley
Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University
Elevation (altitude), aspect and slope of 33 one-hectare plots in Karawatha Forest Park. The plots are at 500 m intervals in a grid that covers the entire Park. Each plot follows the elevational contour and is 250 m long x 40 m wide. Measurements were taken during 2007.
  • elevation
  • altitude
  • aspect
  • slope
  • topography
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2011-10-25
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
shuker.10.14

Butler; Hero; Castley

Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University

Transfer of C and N from the Surface Litter into the Mineral Soil Using Isotopically Labelled Plant Residues in Tracer Studies, South East Queensland Peri-Urban Supersite, Samford, 2013
Mitchell; Scheer; Rowlings
QUT
The conceptual link between surface C inputs and soil C stocks is clear: more inputs leads to more soil C. But our understanding of surface C and N movement into the soil is actually very limited. Surface C moves into the soil through leaching and mixing processes, but it is less certain what proportion of surface C remains in the soil (versus what is lost to the atmosphere as CO2) and for how long and in what pools it resides. Due to the lack of quantitative information on the fate of above-ground C inputs, the current suite of crop-soil models poorly represents the movement of C and N into the soil and their stabilisation within soil fractions. This major gap in our understanding limits our ability to accurately forecast how changes in management practices will affect C sequestration. The research will address this knowledge gap through site-based experimentation, representing a unique and practical opportunity to further our understanding of SOM dynamics, improve modelling capabilities, whilst better understanding how climate and management drive changes in soil C stocks. Experiments will be carried out at the following sites: Samford Ecological Research Station Facility (SERF); Kidman Springs, NT; Brigalow Research Station, QLD; Tamworth (Colorado Farm); Crow's Nest Farm; Kingsthorpe; Longreach Research Station; Belmont Research Station; and Boulia.
  • Soil organic matter
  • Litter devomposition
  • Isotopes
  • Carbon sequestration
  • Land-use changes
  • Samford Ecological Research Station Facility (SERF)
  • Kidman Springs, NT
  • Brigalow Research Station, QLD
  • Tamworth (Colorado Farm)
  • Crow's Nest Farm
  • Kingsthorpe.
  • Longreach Research Station
  • Belmont Research Station
  • Boulia
  1  
Published
2014-02-03
 
Last updated
2015-09-16
 
docid
mccafferty.61.7

Mitchell; Scheer; Rowlings

QUT

Vascular Plant Data, Direct measurement of all stems ≥ 10 cm DBH, South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2012
Bradford; Tucker; Grace
CSIRO; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
All stems ≥10 cm DBH were measured and mapped for the 1 hectare plot in August 2012. Stems were marked with aluminium tags if ≥10 cm and ≤ 30cm DBH. A line completely encircling the stem was painted at 1.3 m indicating point of measurement. Stems >30 cm DBH had the tree number painted onto the stem or marked using a stainless steel wire tapped into the stem. Heights were measured for each stem. Stems were mapped within each 20 m by 20 m subplot.
  • SEQP
  • direct measurement of stems
  • DBH
  • height
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQ Peri-Urban
  1  
Published
2015-04-20
 
Last updated
2017-03-21
 
docid
tucker.49.5

Bradford; Tucker; Grace

CSIRO; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Vascular Plant Data, Direct Measure of Stems, Above Ground Biomass, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, Core 1 ha, 2015
Hero; Lollback
Griffith University
All standing vegetation with a diameter at breast height ≥10 cm was identified and measured for height, DBH, health and growth status, individually tagged and located within the 1 hectare core plot at the Karawatha Forest node of the South-East Queensland Peri-Urban Supersite (-27.63°, 153.08°). Survey work was undertaken from early February until mid May, 2015. The allometric equation, e was used to estimate biomass (Willliams et al. 2005*) of each tree. This was then corrected for dead trees. That is, trees with S1 growth stage were assigned 90% of the estimated biomass and trees with a S2 or S3 growth stage were assigned 55% of the estimated biomass. *Williams, R.J., Zerihun, A., Montagu, K.D., Hoffman, M., Hutley, L.B. and Chen, X. (2005). Allometry for estimating aboveground tree biomass in tropical and subtropical eucalypt woodlands: towards general predictive equations. Australian Journal of Botany v53, pp. 607-719.
  • 0607
  • 0705
  • vegetation
  • biomass
  • SEQP
  • South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite
  • Karawatha Forest
  1  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2015-12-22
 
docid
supersite.548.5

Hero; Lollback

Griffith University

Vascular Plant Data, Direct Measure of Stems, South East Queensland SuperSite, Karawatha, Core 1 ha, 2015
Hero
Griffith University
All standing vegetation with a diameter at breast height >10 cm was identified and measured for height, DBH, health and growth status, individually tagged and located within the 1 hectare core plot at the Karawatha Forest node of the South-East Queensland Peri-Urban Supersite (-27.63°, 153.08°). Survey work was undertaken from early February until mid May, 2015.
  • vegetation
  • SEQP
  • South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite
  • Karawatha Forest
  • 0607
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-09-29
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.259.6

Hero

Griffith University

Vascular Plant Data, Seedling Survey, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2014
Grace; Tucker
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Seedling transects were surveyed in 2012, however their locations relative to now permanent 20 m x 20 m subplot markers were difficult to identify based on previous measurements. Therefore, six new seedling transects approximating the original 2012 locations were established with individual plant positions marked by blue aluminium tags. Three 20 m x 1 m seedling transects were oriented 112° (transects 1 to 3) and three were oriented 292° (transects 4 to 6) within the core 1 ha plot running in an approximate west-to-east or east-to-west direction. A measuring tape was laid between designated 20 m x 20 m subplot markers indicating the length (20 m) of each individual transect. The width of each seedling transect (1 m) was measured to the south of the 20 m tape for transects 1 to 3, and to the north of the 20 m tape for transects 4 to 6. Pre-existing tags from 2012 were identified where possible and recorded.
  • SEQP
  • seedling
  • recruitment
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQ Peri-urban
  1  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.562.7

Grace; Tucker

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Vascular Plant Data, Seedling Survey, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2015
Grace; Tucker
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Three 20 m x 1 m seedling transects were oriented 112° (transects 1 to 3) and three were oriented 292° (transects 4 to 6) within the 1 ha plot running in an approximate west-to-east or east-to-west direction. A measuring tape was laid between designated 20 m x 20 m subplot markers indicating the length (20 m) of each individual transect. The width of each seedling transect (1 m) was measured to the south of the 20 m tape for transects 1 to 3, and to the north of the 20 m tape for transects 4 to 6. It must be noted that the 1 ha plot had been subjected to weed management activities in accordance with the remainder of the property since the previous survey in 2014.
  • 0602
  • 0705
  • SEQP
  • seedling
  • recruitment
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQ Peri-urban
  1  
Published
2015-12-21
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.569.7

Grace; Tucker

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Vascular Plant Data, Seedling Survey, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2016
Grace; Tucker
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Three 20 m x 1 m seedling transects were oriented 112° (transects 1 to 3) and three were oriented 292° (transects 4 to 6) within the 1 ha plot running in an approximate west-to-east or east-to-west direction. A measuring tape was laid between designated 20 m x 20 m subplot markers indicating the length (20 m) of each individual transect. The width of each seedling transect (1 m) was measured to the south of the 20 m tape for transects 1 to 3, and to the north of the 20 m tape for transects 4 to 6. It must be noted that the 1 ha plot had been subjected to weed management activities in accordance with the remainder of the property since the previous survey in 2015.
  • 0602
  • 0705
  • SEQP
  • seedling
  • recruitment
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQ Peri-urban
  1  
Published
2017-01-19
 
Last updated
2017-02-02
 
docid
supersite.775.4

Grace; Tucker

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Vascular Plant Data, Seedling Survey, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2017
Grace; Tucker
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
Three 20 m x 1 m seedling transects were oriented 112° (transects 1 to 3) and three were oriented 292° (transects 4 to 6) within the 1 ha plot running in an approximate west-to-east or east-to-west direction. A measuring tape was laid between designated 20 m x 20 m subplot markers indicating the length (20 m) of each individual transect. The width of each seedling transect (1 m) was measured to the south of the 20 m tape for transects 1 to 3, and to the north of the 20 m tape for transects 4 to 6. It must be noted that the 1 ha plot had been subjected to weed management activities in accordance with the remainder of the property since the previous survey in 2015.
  • 0602
  • 0705
  • SEQP
  • seedling
  • recruitment
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQ Peri-urban
  1  
Published
2017-01-19
 
Last updated
2017-02-02
 
docid
supersite.778.3

Grace; Tucker

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Vegetation Data, Abundance Cover and Structure, South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford Node, Core 1 ha, 2012
Gane
Institute for Sustainable Resources
The vegetation assessment of the Samford Ecological Research Facility site was conducted by CSIRO (Matt Bradford and Andrew Ford) on 6th to 11th August 2012. Assessments carried out were 1) survey of all trees >10cm DBH, 2) full species inventory of the hectare, 3) Gentry transects assessing cover and abundance of the mid-story, 4) seedling transects, 5) Coarse woody debri (entire hectare) , 6) photographs.
  • vegetation
  • SERF
  • Samford
  • SEQP
  • survey
  • species
  • photographs
  • plants
  • botanical
  • 0602
  13  
Published
2013-01-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.334.19

Gane

Institute for Sustainable Resources

Vegetation Data, Standing Above Ground Biomass, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2012
Tucker; Grace; Bradford
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; CSIRO
Standing above ground biomass (AGB) for the 1 hectare plot was calculated based on measurements taken in 2012. Measurements included the DBH (cm), height (m) and wood density (g/cm³) for stems ≥10 cm DBH. Estimates of AGB (kg) were based on the model 4 equation described in Chave et al. (2014): AGB = 0.0673 x (ρD²H) 0.976 where D is DBH, height is H and wood density is ρ. Chave, J., Rejou-Mechain, M., Burquez, A., Chidumayo, E., Colgan, M. S., Delitti, W. B., . . . Vieilledent, G. (2014). Improved allometric models to estimate the aboveground biomass of tropical trees. Global Change Biology, 20(10), 3177-3190. doi: 10.1111/gcb.12629
  • SEQP
  • standing above ground biomass
  • AGB
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQ Peri-urban
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2015-01-30
 
Last updated
2016-10-12
 
docid
tucker.17.17

Tucker; Grace; Bradford

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology; CSIRO

Vegetation Species List, South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2012
Grace
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
A vegetation species list was compiled for the South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite at Samford in 2012.
  • SEQP
  • vascular plants
  • species list
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQ Peri-Urban
  1  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.560.3

Grace

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Vegetation Species List, South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2015
Grace
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
A complete vascular plant species list was compiled for the South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite at Samford in early 2015. Each plant was identified to family, genus and species levels, classified as native or exotic, categorised if identified in the previous survey but absent from the current survey, and identified where genetic samples, voucher specimens or carbon isotope samples were collected.
  • SEQP
  • vascular plants
  • species list
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQ Peri-Urban
  1  
Published
2015-03-30
 
Last updated
2016-10-12
 
docid
tucker.46.9

Grace

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Vegetation Species List, South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2016
Grace; Tucker
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
A complete vascular plant species list was compiled for the South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite at Samford in early 2016. Each plant was identified to family, genus and species levels, categorised based on abundance, classified as either native or exotic, identified where genetic samples, voucher specimens or carbon isotope samples were collected, and categorised as either present or missing from previous surveys and the current survey.
  • SEQP
  • vascular plants
  • species list
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQP Peri-Urban
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2016-04-25
 
Last updated
2016-04-25
 
docid
supersite.654.4

Grace; Tucker

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Vegetation Species List, South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, Core 1 ha, 2017
Grace; Tucker
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
A complete vascular plant species list was compiled for the South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite at Samford in 2017. Each plant was identified to family, genus and species levels, categorised based on abundance, classified as either native or exotic, identified where genetic samples, voucher specimens or carbon isotope samples were collected, and categorised as either present or missing from previous surveys and the current survey.
  • SEQP
  • vascular plants
  • species list
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQP Peri-Urban
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2017-03-21
 
Last updated
2017-03-21
 
docid
supersite.850.5

Grace; Tucker

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Vegetation Structural Description, South East Queensland Peri-urban SuperSite, Karawatha, Core 1 ha, 2015
Hero; Lollback
Griffith University
A general vegetation structural description that follows the protocols of the National Vegetation Information Scheme (NVIS) Level IV. The study site was the 1 ha core plot at Karawatha Forest, south-east Queensland. The growth form, height class, cover and listing of the three most dominant species were recorded for the upper, mid and ground stratums.
  • vegetation
  • NVIS
  • SEQP
  • South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite
  • Karawatha Forest
  • 0607
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2015-12-22
 
docid
supersite.546.6

Hero; Lollback

Griffith University

Vegetation Structural Description, South-East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2015
Grace; Tucker
Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology
A National Vegetation Information System (NVIS) level 5 description based on the protocol described by the Australian Vegetation Attribute Manual V.6 (2003) was generated for the 1 hectare plot. Up to three dominant species, cover, dominant growth form per dominant species, and average height class were recorded for upper, mid and ground strata.
  • SEQP
  • general structural description
  • NVIS level 5 description
  • dominant species
  • cover
  • dominant growth form
  • height
  • Samford
  • open eucalypt forest
  • SEQ Peri-urban
  • vegetation
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2015-01-22
 
Last updated
2016-10-12
 
docid
tucker.16.15

Grace; Tucker

Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology

Vegetation Survey of the Samford Ecological Research Facility, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2010
Grace
ISR
A series of vegetation surveys were conducted within the boundaries of the Samford Ecological Research Facility (SERF) during the months of July and August, 2010. The surveys were conducted for the purposes of compiling a botanical species list and reference collection for the study site, and for providing data related to species composition, cover, abundance and density for specific transects and broad vegetation areas.
  • vegetation
  • SERF
  • botanical
  • survey
  • species
  • photographs
  • plants
  • Samford
  • 0602
  38  
Published
2010-09-28
 
Last updated
2015-11-01
 
docid
wahyuni.9.46

Grace

ISR

Vegetation Vertical Profile in Karawatha Forest, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2007-2008
Hughes; Castley; Hero
Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University
Vertical vegetation profiles of 33 one-hectare plots in Karawatha Forest Park. The plots are at 500 m intervals in a grid that covers the entire Park. Each plot follows the elevational contour and is 250 m long x 40 m wide. For each plot, the density of stems within 10 height classes was estimated from counts taken at 10 m intervals along the length (250 m) of the plot. Measurements were taken during the period August 2007 to January 2008.
  • canopy
  • vegetation layers
  • vegetation strata
  • vegetation structure
  • habitat characteristics
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2011-11-02
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
shuker.29.9

Hughes; Castley; Hero

Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University

Water Quality Data, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 201311-201312
Labadz
IFE, Queensland University of Technology
Physico-chemical parameters of the surface water from two permanent sampling sites on the Samford Creek, southeast Queensland, Australia, are determined. The parameters include temperature, pH, turbidity, dissolved oxygen and conductivity. In addition, a velocity Doppler measures flow rate and creek height at these two locations. This data is collected continuously and averaged over 10-minute intervals to investigate the effects of land use change, in particular urbanisation, on the aquatic system in a peri-urban environment. hown here are daily averages of the 10-minute data. Further, the data will be used to validate a catchment hydrological model of the area using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which will simulate the effects of different land use scenarios on the catchment water balance and nutrient fluxes.
  • Physico-chemistry
  • Surface water
  • Urbanisation
  • Peri-urban
  • Land use change
  4  
Published
2014-01-15
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
labadz.93.11

Labadz

IFE, Queensland University of Technology

Weather Station Data, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Samford, 2010-2011
Grace; Wimmer
Queensland University of Technology
Live and historical data on weather conditions at the Samford Ecological Research Facility. Live data is available at: http://serf.n2o.net.au/ Historical data is available at: http://www.serf.qut.edu.au/research/dataresources/weather_monitor_textile.jsp Additional information on Samford weather can be obtained from BOM at: http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/averages/tables/cw_040241.shtml
  • Samford
  • Meteorology
  • Weather
  • 0502
  1  
Published
2011-03-21
 
Last updated
2016-10-17
 
docid
fahmi.24.17

Grace; Wimmer

Queensland University of Technology

Woody Vegetation in Karawatha Forest Park, South East Queensland Peri-Urban SuperSite, Karawatha, 2009
Hero
Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University
Woody vegetation was surveyed at 33 one-hectare plots in Karawatha Forest Park. The plots are at 500 m intervals in a grid that covers the entire Park. Each plot follows the elevational contour and is 250 m long x 40 m wide. Individual woody plants were tagged, identified to species level and measured for DBH, during January and February 2009. Information about the growth of the trees along the transects can be used to estimate the biomass within Karawatha Forest. This can be used to calculate the carbon sequestration of Karawatha Forest and inform of other characteristics related to the trees themselves.
  • vegetation
  • woody plants
  • Eucalyptus
  • Biomass
  • DBH
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2011-10-21
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
shuker.3.18

Hero

Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University