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31 data packages found.

Title and Description Creator (People and Organisation)
Acoustic Sensor, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, 2011
Boer
University of Western Sydney
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-17
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.335.3

Boer

University of Western Sydney

Acoustic Sensor, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, 2012
Boer
University of Western Sydney
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-17
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.336.4

Boer

University of Western Sydney

Acoustic Sensor, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, 2013
Boer
University of Western Sydney
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-17
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.337.3

Boer

University of Western Sydney

Acoustic Sensor, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, 2014
Boer
University of Western Sydney
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-17
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.338.4

Boer

University of Western Sydney

Acoustic Sensor, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, 2015
Boer
Western Sydney University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk). This data package contains acoustic sensor data recorded at the TERN Cumberland Plain SuperSite. Data is in WAV format recorded at 44,100 Hz in stereo. Recordings are available for listening and download at https://bioacoustics.tern.org.au/
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • TERN
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • soundscape
  • 0501
  0  
Published
2017-10-22
 
Last updated
2017-10-22
 
docid
supersite.906.3

Boer

Western Sydney University

Acoustic Sensor, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, 2016
Boer
Western Sydney University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk). This data package contains acoustic sensor data recorded at the TERN Cumberland Plain SuperSite. Data is in WAV format recorded at 44,100 Hz in stereo. Recordings are available for listening and download at https://bioacoustics.tern.org.au/
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • TERN
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • soundscape
  0  
Published
2017-10-22
 
Last updated
2017-10-22
 
docid
supersite.907.3

Boer

Western Sydney University

Acoustic Sensor, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, 2017
Boer
Western Sydney University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk). This data package contains acoustic sensor data recorded at the TERN Cumberland Plain SuperSite. Data is in WAV format recorded at 44,100 Hz in stereo. Recordings are available for listening and download at https://bioacoustics.tern.org.au/
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • TERN
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • soundscape
  • 0502
  0  
Published
2017-10-22
 
Last updated
2017-10-22
 
docid
supersite.908.3

Boer

Western Sydney University

Ant Survey, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Boer
Western Sydney University
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected Apr/May and Nov 2015 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.823.1

Boer

Western Sydney University

Bird Survey Data, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, 2015
Moore
Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment
Bird community composition is surveyed along an established 1 km point transect through Cumberland Plain Woodland. Dominant overstorey tree species include Eucalyptus tereticornis, Eucalyptus moluccana, Angophora subvelutina and Melaleuca decora with an understorey including Bursaria spinosa and Acacia parramattensis over a predominantly grassy ground storey. Surveys are undertaken quarterly by three or four experienced observers. Surveys commence at first light. Observers walk slowly along the transect in a group and pause for 5 mins at each of 11 locations spaced at 100 m intervals along the transect. Records are made at each point and while walking between points of the presence of any bird species identified from their calls, and for birds sighted and identified visually, records also include the number of individuals, distance from the observers and behaviour. Weather conditions at the time of the survey are also recorded.
  • fauna
  • bird community
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  • 0602
  • 0608
  6  
Published
2015-06-25
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.154.16

Moore

Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment

Bird Survey Data, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, 2016
Moore; Boer
Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment; Western Sydney University
Bird community composition is surveyed along an established 1 km point transect through Cumberland Plain Woodland. Dominant overstorey tree species include Eucalyptus tereticornis, Eucalyptus moluccana, Angophora subvelutina and Melaleuca decora with an understorey including Bursaria spinosa and Acacia parramattensis over a predominately grassy ground storey. Surveys are undertaken quarterly by three or four experienced observers. Surveys commence at first light. Observers walk slowly along the transect in a group and pause for 5 mins at each of 11 locations spaced at 100 m intervals along the transect. Records are made at each point and while walking between points of the presence of any bird species identified from their calls, and for birds sighted and identified visually, records also include the number of individuals, distance from the observers and behaviour. Weather conditions at the time of the survey are also recorded.
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • fauna
  • bird community
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  4  
Published
2016-03-29
 
Last updated
2017-05-22
 
docid
supersite.593.10

Moore; Boer

Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment; Western Sydney University

Bird Survey Data, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, 2017
Moore; Boer
Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment; Western Sydney University
Bird community composition is surveyed along an established 1 km point transect through Cumberland Plain Woodland. Dominant overstorey tree species include Eucalyptus tereticornis, Eucalyptus moluccana, Angophora subvelutina and Melaleuca decora with an understorey including Bursaria spinosa and Acacia parramattensis over a predominately grassy ground storey. Surveys are undertaken quarterly by three or four experienced observers. Surveys commence at first light. Observers walk slowly along the transect in a group and pause for 5 mins at each of 11 locations spaced at 100 m intervals along the transect. Records are made at each point and while walking between points of the presence of any bird species identified from their calls, and for birds sighted and identified visually, records also include the number of individuals, distance from the observers and behaviour. Weather conditions at the time of the survey are also recorded.
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • fauna
  • bird community
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  3  
Published
2017-05-22
 
Last updated
2017-07-25
 
docid
supersite.856.3

Moore; Boer

Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment; Western Sydney University

Coarse Woody Debris, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Boer
Western Sydney University
Following the general ASN Monitoring protocol (Annexure 1, TERN Australian SuperSite Network, NCRIS-2013 Monitoring Protocols, NCRIS-2013 Annexure1 Ver1_1_4.pdf) the length and diameter at both ends of all pieces of fallen wood, including lianas, with diameter larger than 10 cm within the 1 ha plot were measured. Pieces of coarse woody debris (CWD) which may consist of one or more segments were tagged, and segments measured.
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  • coarse woody debris
  • cwd
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2015-11-26
 
Last updated
2015-11-30
 
docid
supersite.363.6

Boer

Western Sydney University

Gentry Survey, Mid Strata, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Rymer
Western Sydney University
Following the general ASN Monitoring protocol (Annexure 1, TERN Australian SuperSite Network, NCRIS-2013 Monitoring Protocols, NCRIS-2013 Annexure1 Ver1_1_4.pdf) the mid-strata (live, > 1.5m height) within the core 1 hectare were surveyed along 10 gentry transects (2m wide, 50m length). All mid-strata have a numbered aluminium tag, and have been measured for DBH, height, and cover at N,S,E and W compass bearing. Diameters were measured using digital callipers, and a DBH tape for stems >5cm DBH. Heights and cover were measured using a measuring tape.
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • species composition
  • forest structure
  • flora
  • Cumberland Plain Supersite
  1  
Published
2015-11-26
 
Last updated
2015-11-26
 
docid
supersite.381.6

Rymer

Western Sydney University

Gentry Survey, Seedlings, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Rymer
Western Sydney University
Following the general ASN Monitoring protocol (Annexure 1, TERN Australian SuperSite Network, NCRIS-2013 Monitoring Protocols, NCRIS-2013 Annexure1 Ver1_1_4.pdf) the seedling (>0.1 and < 1.5m height) within the core 1 hectare were surveyed 6 transects (1 m wide, 20 m ling) on the Gentry Transects. Within each transect seedling were tagged with a unique number, species was recorded, along with its height and DBH (plants >1.3m height).
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • species composition
  • forest structure
  • flora
  • Cumberland Plain Supersite
  1  
Published
2015-11-26
 
Last updated
2015-11-26
 
docid
supersite.383.4

Rymer

Western Sydney University

Gentry Survey, Sub-strata, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Rymer
Western Sydney University
Following the general ASN Monitoring protocol (Annexure 1, TERN Australian SuperSite Network, NCRIS-2013 Monitoring Protocols, NCRIS-2013 Annexure1 Ver1_1_4.pdf) the sub-strata (< 1.5m height) within the core 1 hectare were surveyed in 100 (1m2) quadrats evenly distributed along 10 Gentry Transects. Within each quadrat the dominant grass, herb and woody species was recorded, along with its mean height and percentage cover. The mean height and percentage cover was also recorded for grass, herb and woody species.
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • species composition
  • forest structure
  • flora
  • Cumberland Plain Supersite
  1  
Published
2015-11-26
 
Last updated
2015-11-26
 
docid
supersite.385.3

Rymer

Western Sydney University

Leaf Area Index Data, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Boer
University of Western Sydney
Following the general SuperSite Monitoring protocol (Annexure 1, TERN Australian SuperSite Network, NCRIS-2013 Monitoring Protocols, NCRIS-2013 Annexure1 Ver1_1_4.pdf) digital canopy photos were taken. Photopoints were located at 10 m intervals along the 10 Gentry Transects (11 photos per transect). Photos were analysed and LAI computed according to an R-version of the Macfarlane protocol (written by Dr. Remko Duursma)
  • leaf area index
  • canopy density
  • forest structure
  • Cumberland Plain Supersite
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0606
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2015-07-01
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.158.7

Boer

University of Western Sydney

Leaf Area Index Data, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2016
Boer
Western Sydney University
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and (Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha on 18 April and 12 Oct 2016. The protocol followed the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Digital Canopy Photography method. Photopoints were located at 10 m intervals along the 10 Gentry Transects (11 photos per transect). Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/cblp/default
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0606
  • 0607
  • leaf area index
  • foliage protection cover
  • crown cover
  • cover porosity
  • Digital Canopy Photography
  • forest structure
  • canopy density
  • Cumberland Plain Supersite
  2  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-15
 
docid
supersite.784.6

Boer

Western Sydney University

Leaf Area Index Images, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Boer
Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and (Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha on 10 Mar 2015. Following the general SuperSite Monitoring protocol (Annexure 1, TERN Australian SuperSite Network, NCRIS-2013 Monitoring Protocols, NCRIS-2013 Annexure1 Ver1_1_4.pdf) digital canopy photos were taken. Photopoints were located at 10 m intervals along the 10 Gentry Transects (11 photos per transect). Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/cblp/default
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  • foliage protection cover
  • crown cover
  • cover porosity
  • Leaf Area Index
  • Digital Canopy Photography
  • Core 1 ha
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.783.2

Boer

Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment

Leaf Area Index Images, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2016
Boer
Western Sydney University
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and (Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha on 18 Mar and 12 Oct 2016. The protocol followed the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Digital Canopy Photography method. Photopoints were located at 10 m intervals along the 10 Gentry Transects (11 photos per transect). Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/cblp/default
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • Leaf Area Index
  • foliage protection cover
  • crown cover
  • cover porosity
  • Digital Canopy Photography
  • forest structure
  • canopy density
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  1  
Published
2016-11-27
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.739.5

Boer

Western Sydney University

Leaf Traits, Cumberland Plain EucFACE SuperSite, 2012
Crous; Ellsworth
University of Western Sydney
Measurements of light-saturated leaf photosynthesis and associated leaf traits were made in the morning hours at the top of the plant, designed to reflect physiological capacity for net CO2 uptake by leaves. These measurements were made on the dominant species of the grassy Eucalyptus woodland that comprises EucFACE.
  • Photosynthesis
  • Leaf traits
  • Leaf nitrogen concentration
  • Leaf net CO2 assimilation rate
  • plant physiology
  • plant physiological ecology
  1  
Published
2013-01-15
 
Last updated
2015-09-16
 
docid
ellsworth.6.11

Crous; Ellsworth

University of Western Sydney

Photopoint Images, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Boer
Western Sydney University
Photopoint images were collected 1 June 2015 at each corner and centre of the Cumberland Plain SuperSite Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. Cumberland Plain SuperSite photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/cblp/default
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • Photography
  1  
Published
2015-07-01
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.164.8

Boer

Western Sydney University

Photopoint Images, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2016
Boer
University of Western Sydney
Photopoint images were collected 18 Apr 2016 at each corner and centre of the Cumberland Plain SuperSite Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. Cumberland Plain SuperSite photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/cblp/default
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  • core 1ha
  • Photography
  1  
Published
2016-06-07
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.689.6

Boer

University of Western Sydney

Site and Soil Characterisation, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, 2015
Pendall
Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment
Site and soil characterisation at the Cumberland Plain SuperSite.
  • soil chemistry
  • soil texture
  • soil carbon
  • Cumberland Plain
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-11-25
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.232.5

Pendall

Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment

Soil Physico-Chemistry Data, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, 2013
Pendall
Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment
Soils were sampled in the vicinity of the Cumberland Plain flux tower and submitted for analysis of chemistry and particle size. Analyses revealed that the soil is high in carbon at the surface (about 5% by weight) and becomes more rich in clay at deeper depths.
  • 0503
  • soil chemistry
  • soil texture
  • soil carbon
  • Cumberland Plain
  1  
Published
2015-05-25
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.71.12

Pendall

Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment

Standing Dead Trees, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Boer
Western Sydney University
Following the general ASN Monitoring protocol (Annexure 1, TERN Australian SuperSite Network, NCRIS-2013 Monitoring Protocols, NCRIS-2013 Annexure1 Ver1_1_4.pdf) the diameter at breast height (DBH) and height up to a diameter of 10 cm of all standing dead trees ( > 10 cm DBH) within the core 1 hectare were measured. All these trees have a numbered aluminium tag. Diameters were measured using a DBH tape. Tree heights were measured using a Haglof Vertex Laser device.
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  • flora
  • forest structure
  • species composition
  1  
Published
2015-11-26
 
Last updated
2015-11-30
 
docid
supersite.365.5

Boer

Western Sydney University

Standing Dead Trees, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Boer
Western Sydney University
Following the general ASN Monitoring protocol (Annexure 1, TERN Australian SuperSite Network, NCRIS-2013 Monitoring Protocols, NCRIS-2013 Annexure1 Ver1_1_4.pdf) the diameter at breast height (DBH) and height up to a diameter of 10 cm of all standing dead trees ( > 10 cm DBH) within the core 1 hectare were measured. All these trees have a numbered aluminium tag. Diameters were measured using a DBH tape. Tree heights were measured using a Haglof Vertex Laser device.
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • Cumberland Plain SuperSite
  • flora
  • forest structure
  • species composition
  1  
Published
2015-11-26
 
Last updated
2015-11-30
 
docid
supersite.369.5

Boer

Western Sydney University

Vascular Plant Data, Direct Measure of Stems, Above Ground Biomass, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Boer
University of Western Sydney
Following the general ASN Monitoring protocol (Annexure 1, TERN Australian SuperSite Network, NCRIS-2013 Monitoring Protocols, NCRIS-2013 Annexure1 Ver1_1_4.pdf) the diameter at breast height (DBH) and height of all standing trees (dead and live, > 10 cm DBH) within the core 1 hectare were measured. All these trees have a numbered aluminium tag. Diameters were measured using a DBH tape. Tree heights were measured using a Haglof Vertex Laser device. Note that tree heights were measured on 16 October 2014, i.e. nearly 6 months after the DBH measurements.
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • species composition
  • forest structure
  • flora
  • Cumberland Plain Supersite
  1  
Published
2015-07-01
 
Last updated
2015-11-26
 
docid
supersite.160.7

Boer

University of Western Sydney

Vascular Plant Data, Direct Measure of Stems, Above Ground Biomass, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Boer
University of Western Sydney
Following the general ASN Monitoring protocol (Annexure 1, TERN Australian SuperSite Network, NCRIS-2013 Monitoring Protocols, NCRIS-2013 Annexure1 Ver1_1_4.pdf) the diameter at breast height (DBH) and height of all standing trees (dead and live, > 10 cm DBH) within the core 1 hectare were measured. All these trees have a numbered aluminium tag. Diameters were measured using a DBH tape. Tree heights were measured using a Haglof Vertex Laser device.
  • species composition
  • forest structure
  • flora
  • Cumberland Plain Supersite
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2015-07-01
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.162.6

Boer

University of Western Sydney

Vascular Plant Data, Direct Measure of Stems, Above Ground Biomass, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2016
Boer
University of Western Sydney
Following the general ASN Monitoring protocol (Annexure 1, TERN Australian SuperSite Network, NCRIS-2013 Monitoring Protocols, NCRIS-2013 Annexure1 Ver1_1_4.pdf) the diameter at breast height (DBH) and height up to a diameter of 10 cm of all trees ( > 10 cm DBH) within the core 1 hectare were measured. All these trees have a numbered aluminium tag. Diameters were measured using a DBH tape. Tree heights were measured using a Haglof Vertex Laser device. Percentage mistletoe infestation was estimated on a scale of 0-5. Biomass was calculated using the equation from Paul et al. 2013.
  • species composition
  • forest structure
  • flora
  • Cumberland Plain Supersite
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2016-06-07
 
Last updated
2016-06-07
 
docid
supersite.687.4

Boer

University of Western Sydney

Vegetation Species List, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Rymer
Western Sydney University
Following the general ASN Monitoring protocol (Annexure 1, TERN Australian SuperSite Network, NCRIS-2013 Monitoring Protocols, NCRIS-2013 Annexure1 Ver1_1_4.pdf) the mid-strata (live, > 1.5m height) within the core 1 hectare were surveyed along 10 gentry transects (2m wide, 50m length). All mid-strata have a numbered aluminium tag, and have been measured for DBH, height, and cover at N,S,E and W compass bearing. Diameters were measured using digital callipers, and a DBH tape for stems >5cm DBH. Heights and cover were measured using a measuring tape.
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • species composition
  • forest structure
  • flora
  • Cumberland Plain Supersite
  1  
Published
2015-11-26
 
Last updated
2015-11-26
 
docid
supersite.379.2

Rymer

Western Sydney University

Vegetation Structural Description, Cumberland Plain SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Haigh
Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment
The Cumberland Plain SuperSite is located in remnant Eucalyptus woodland on the Cumberland Plain on the Hawkesbury campus of the University of Western Sydney near Richmond New South Wales. The Cumberland Plain SuperSite core hectare is located in Shale Gravel Transition Forest as mapped by Benson (1992) and Tozer (2003). The dominant canopy species are Eucalyptus fibrosa and Eucalyptus moluccana with Melaleuca decora commonly occurring as a small tree. The shrub layer is dominated by Bursaria spinosa with small shrubs, forbs, grasses and ferns occurring in the ground layer.
  • vegetation
  • general structure description
  • dominant species
  • dominant growth form
  • vegetation cover
  • Cumberland Plain
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0607
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-08-02
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.185.4

Haigh

Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment