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158 data packages found.

Title and Description Creator (People and Organisation)
Above Ground Biomass, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha and 25 ha plots, 2013
Bradford; Ford
CSIRO, Tropical Forest Research Centre
For the first time we report a measurement of basal area and a calculation of above ground living biomass for an Australian tropical rainforest derived from a comprehensive ground survey of a large area. Previous published values (Liddell et al. 2007; Preece et al. 2012) have been based on small plot sizes which may lead to inaccurate estimates particularly if large trees are present. However, caution should be taken in assuming that our figure of 418 Mg ha-1 is representative of a natural forest, as this tract of forest and extensive areas of similar forests have been modified by logging during the 20th century. Although logging was seen as best practice at the time as it selected for species and stem size, it was a major driver of floristic and stand structure change of both this plot and Australian tropical rainforest in general. Values for extracted timber in the Wet Tropics (Crome et al. 1992) indicate that stem (6.6 trees ha-1) and volume (37 m3 ha-1) loss was minimal. However, the incidental damage imposed on the forest, including 22% loss of canopy cover, was presumably enough to alter short term growth and recruitment dynamics. On the Robson creek plot the large proportion of stems 10-20 cm DBH and the prominence of early successional species such as Litsea leefeana, Cardwellia sublimis and Flindersia bourjotiana more than 40 years after logging ceased are evidence of this. Whether the subsequent recruitment and growth of such species has recovered or even exceeded the biomass lost by extraction of timber and associated incidental loss is debateable and cannot be tested as there are no similar large areas of unlogged forest. However, a 0.5 ha unlogged plot adjacent to the Robson Creek plot has an equivalent AGB of 700 Mg ha-1 (Murphy et al. 2013) which is considerably larger than any value recorded on the 25 ha plot. Recent severe disturbance events in Australian tropical rainforests are not restricted to anthropogenic drivers. Cyclones are particularly important structuring elements of rainforest in the wet tropics of Australia with historical data suggesting that a severe cyclone (categories 4–5) will cross the coast of Australia about every 75 years (Turton & Stork 2009). Severe cyclone Larry in 2006 caused major structural damage to the forest around the plot including the mortality of 74 trees ha-1 ≥10 cm DBH (Metcalfe et al. 2008; Murphy et al. 2013). Moreover, current aggregations on the Robson 25 ha plot of large Blepharocarya involucrigera (Anacardaceae), a successional species, suggest at least one large disturbance event on a centurial time scale.
  • above ground biomass
  • biomass
  • stems
  • FNQR
  • Robson Creek
  • 0705
  2  
Published
2015-07-27
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.174.5

Bradford; Ford

CSIRO, Tropical Forest Research Centre

Acoustic Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2012
Liddell
James Cook University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Daintree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-16
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.325.4

Liddell

James Cook University

Acoustic Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2013
Liddell
James Cook University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Daintree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-16
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.326.5

Liddell

James Cook University

Acoustic Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2014
Liddell
James Cook University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Daintree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-16
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.327.5

Liddell

James Cook University

Acoustic Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2015
Liddell
James Cook University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Daintree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2016-04-13
 
Last updated
2016-10-18
 
docid
supersite.328.5

Liddell

James Cook University

Acoustic Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2016
Liddell
James Cook University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Daintree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2016-10-18
 
Last updated
2016-10-18
 
docid
supersite.721.3

Liddell

James Cook University

Acoustic Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2017
Liddell
James Cook University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk). This data package contains acoustic sensor data recorded in the vicinity of the Core 1 hectare at the TERN FNQ Rainforest SuperSite at the Daintree Rainforest Observatory. Data is in WAV format recorded at 44,100 Hz in stereo. Recordings are available for listening and download at t https://bioacoustics.tern.org.au/
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0608
  • TERN
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Daintree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • soundscape
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-10-22
 
Last updated
2017-10-22
 
docid
supersite.910.2

Liddell

James Cook University

Acoustic Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2012
Liddell
James Cook University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  1  
Published
2015-11-16
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.329.3

Liddell

James Cook University

Acoustic Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2013
Liddell
James Cook University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  1  
Published
2015-11-16
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.330.3

Liddell

James Cook University

Acoustic Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2014
Liddell
James Cook University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  1  
Published
2015-11-16
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.331.3

Liddell

James Cook University

Acoustic Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2015
Liddell
James Cook University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  1  
Published
2016-10-18
 
Last updated
2016-10-18
 
docid
supersite.719.2

Liddell

James Cook University

Acoustic Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2016
Liddell
James Cook University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  1  
Published
2016-10-18
 
Last updated
2016-10-18
 
docid
supersite.720.2

Liddell

James Cook University

Acoustic Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2017
Liddell
James Cook University
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk). This data package contains acoustic sensor data recorded in the vicinity of the Core 1 hectare at the TERN Far North Queensland SuperSite at Robson Creek, Danbulla National Park. Data is in WAV format recorded at 44,100 Hz in stereo. Recordings are available for listening and download at https://bioacoustics.tern.org.au/
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • TERN
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • soundscape
  • 0501
  0  
Published
2017-10-22
 
Last updated
2017-10-22
 
docid
supersite.896.4

Liddell

James Cook University

Ant Survey, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2014
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected 27 - 30 Oct 2014 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Cape Tribulation
  • Rainforest
  • Core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate
  • fauna
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.818.2

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Ant Survey, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2015
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected 14 - 17 Apr 2015 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Cape Tribulation
  • Rainforest
  • Core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.820.2

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Ant Survey, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2016
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected in 2016 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Cape Tribulation
  • Rainforest
  • Core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.821.2

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Ant Survey, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2014
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected 16 - 19 Oct 2014 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  • Rainforest
  • Core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.824.1

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Ant Survey, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2015
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected 9 - 12 Apr 2015 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  • Rainforest
  • Core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.825.2

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Ant Survey, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2016
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected in 2016 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  • Rainforest
  • Core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.826.2

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Australian Wet Tropics Rainforest Invertebrate Collection, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, 2006-2010
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change
Contextual data for the FNQ Rainforest Supersite. The collection (https://research.jcu.edu.au/researchdata/default/detail/0384c3b2298987a7afe6d68735f13c13/) consists of a database and physical collection of sampled invertebrates from four distinct sampling methodologies conducted across latitudinal and altitudinal gradients with rainforests of the Wet Tropics bioregion between 2006 and 2010. Locations of insect sampling coincide with long-term vertebrate and climate monitoring sites done by the Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate ChangeTraps were monitored on a monthly basis from 2006 to 2010. Flying insects were sampled with non-baited Malaise and Flight Intercept traps. Ground dwelling insect species were sampled with both passive (non-baited) and active (baited with kangaroo dung, to attract dung beetles) Pitfall traps. Most of the insects collected remain preserved in specimen jars. Where resources were available, specimens were sorted and records of abundance are linked to an invertebrate taxonomy table which contains information about species taxonomic classification (Carabid Ground Beetles, Dung Beetles, and Schizophoran Flies) and species life-history traits (Schizophoran Flies only). This research has been funded in full or part by the following funding agencies: Skyrail Rainforest Foundation; Earthwatch Institute; Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF); National Environmental Research Program (NERP); Rainforest CRC; Australian Research Council.
  • vertebrate
  • Australian Wet Tropics
  • insect sampling
  • species distribution
  • abundance
  • invertebrate specimens
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2012-08-29
 
Last updated
2015-11-26
 
docid
lloyd.229.19

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change

Australian Wet Tropics Rainforest Microclimate Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, 2006-2010
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change
Contextual data for the FNQ Rainforest Supersite. The collection (https://research.jcu.edu.au/researchdata/default/detail/c57985fa2a3f845b9e896c6e4ef0c6c5/) consists of empirical measurements of microclimate conducted between 2006 and present in rainforest sites coinciding with long-term monitoring locations throughout the Australia Wet Tropics bioregion. Multiple aspects of microclimate were sampled during this time period, these include: ambient air temperature (~1.5 m above ground), ambient air humidity, ‘leaf wetness’ or condensation (a proxy for occult precipitation), soil surface moisture, soil surface temperature, and under-log temperature. Measurements are taken every 30 minutes (or every hour for under-log temperature) and data collected monthly to minimize error associated with potential dislodgement of data-loggers from their intended location. Data is vetted upon entry, but due to the large number of records (6.5 + million and growing) should be inspected before use. This research has been funded in full or part by the following funding agencies: Skyrail Rainforest Foundation; Earthwatch Institute; Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF); National Environmental Research Program (NERP); Rainforest CRC; Australian Research Council.
  • vertebrate
  • Australian Wet Tropics
  • insect sampling
  • species distribution
  • abundance
  • invertebrate specimens
  • CTBCC
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2012-08-29
 
Last updated
2015-11-26
 
docid
lloyd.230.18

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change

BASE Contextual, Soil Physico-Chemical Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2013
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Soil collection and analysis of chemical and physical attributes was carried out to provide contextual data for the Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) soil microbial diversity project (http://www.bioplatforms.com/soil-biodiversity/). Nine discrete soil samples from a 25 m x 25 m quadrat, sampled (0 – 10cm). Eight samples were taken at the corners and mid-points of the 25 m x 25m sides of the quadrat, with sample taken at the centre. The nine subsamples were combined to return a single surface soil sample per quadrat. Samples for chemical and physical analysis were air-dried and transported to CSBP laboratories, Perth, Australia.
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • soil
  • physico-chemical
  • chemistry
  • Daintree
  • core 1 ha
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2016-04-26
 
Last updated
2016-04-26
 
docid
supersite.656.3

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

BASE Contextual, Soil Physico-Chemical Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Drought Plot, 2013
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Soil collection and analysis of chemical and physical attributes was carried out to provide contextual data for the Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) soil microbial diversity project (http://www.bioplatforms.com/soil-biodiversity/). Nine discrete soil samples from a 25 m x 25 m quadrat (0 – 10cm). Eight samples were taken at the corners and mid-points of the 25 m x 25m sides of the quadrat, with a sample taken at the centre. The nine subsamples were combined to return a single soil sample per quadrat. Samples for chemical and physical analysis were air-dried and transported to CSBP laboratories, Perth, Australia.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0503
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • soil
  • physico-chemical
  • chemistry
  • Daintree
  • drought
  1  
Published
2016-04-26
 
Last updated
2016-04-26
 
docid
supersite.658.2

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

BASE Contextual, Soil Physico-Chemical Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Tower Soil Pit Site, 2013
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Soil collection and analysis of chemical and physical attributes was carried out to provide contextual data for the Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) soil microbial diversity project (http://www.bioplatforms.com/soil-biodiversity/). Nine discrete soil samples from a 25 m x 25 m quadrat (0 – 10cm). Eight samples were taken at the corners and mid-points of the 25 m x 25m sides of the quadrat, with a sample taken at the centre. The nine subsamples were combined to return a single soil sample per quadrat. Samples for chemical and physical analysis were air-dried and transported to CSBP laboratories, Perth, Australia.
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • soil
  • physico-chemical
  • chemistry
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • Cape Tribulation
  • Tower Soil Pit Site
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2016-04-27
 
Last updated
2016-04-27
 
docid
supersite.660.2

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

BASE Contextual, Soil Physico-Chemical Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2013
Liddell
James Cook University
Soil collection and analysis of chemical and physical attributes was carried out to provide contextual data for the Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) soil microbial diversity project (http://www.bioplatforms.com/soil-biodiversity/). Nine discrete soil samples from a 25 m x 25 m quadrat, sampled at two depth ranges (0 – 10cm and 20 – 30cm). Eight samples were taken at the corners and mid-points of the 25 m x 25m sides of the quadrat, with sample taken at the centre. The nine subsamples were combined for each depth, to return a single surface and deeper soil sample per quadrat. Samples for chemical and physical analysis were air-dried and transported to CSBP laboratories, Perth, Australia.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0503
  • soil
  • physico-chemical
  • chemistry
  • core 1 ha
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  1  
Published
2015-12-06
 
Last updated
2015-12-06
 
docid
supersite.403.3

Liddell

James Cook University

BASE Contextual, Soil Physico-Chemical Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Mt Edith, 1100m, 2013
Liddell
James Cook University
Soil collection and analysis of chemical and physical attributes was carried out to provide contextual data for the Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) soil microbial diversity project (http://www.bioplatforms.com/soil-biodiversity/). Nine discrete soil samples from a 25 m x 25 m quadrat, sampled at two depth ranges (0 – 10cm and 20 – 30cm). Eight samples were taken at the corners and mid-points of the 25 m x 25m sides of the quadrat, with sample taken at the centre. The nine subsamples were combined for each depth, to return a single surface and deeper soil sample per quadrat. Samples for chemical and physical analysis were air-dried and transported to CSBP laboratories, Perth, Australia.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0503
  • soil
  • physico-chemical
  • chemistry
  • core 1 ha
  • FNQR
  • FNQ Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  • Mt Edith
  • 1100m
  1  
Published
2015-12-06
 
Last updated
2015-12-06
 
docid
supersite.407.4

Liddell

James Cook University

BASE Contextual, Soil Physico-Chemical Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Mt Edith, 900m, 2013
Liddell
James Cook University
Soil collection and analysis of chemical and physical attributes was carried out to provide contextual data for the Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) soil microbial diversity project (http://www.bioplatforms.com/soil-biodiversity/). Nine discrete soil samples from a 25 m x 25 m quadrat, sampled at two depth ranges (0 – 10cm and 20 – 30cm). Eight samples were taken at the corners and mid-points of the 25 m x 25m sides of the quadrat, with sample taken at the centre. The nine subsamples were combined for each depth, to return a single surface and deeper soil sample per quadrat. Samples for chemical and physical analysis were air-dried and transported to CSBP laboratories, Perth, Australia.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0503
  • soil
  • physico-chemical
  • chemistry
  • core 1 ha
  • FNQR
  • FNQ Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  • Mt Edith
  • 900m
  1  
Published
2015-12-06
 
Last updated
2015-12-06
 
docid
supersite.405.4

Liddell

James Cook University

Base Geographical Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2010-2013
Bradford
CSIRO
This is the base geographical data for the Robson creek 25 ha plot. The data sets contain the 100 m grid, 20 m grid, 100 m points, 20 m points, major tracks and creeks. Data format is both Google earth KML and ESRI shapefile
  • Robson
  • Grid
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  4  
Published
2011-02-18
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
McKeown.7.12

Bradford

CSIRO

Bird Capture Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2011
McKeown; Westcott
CSIRO
The aim of the bird surveys at Robson Creek are to provide a description of the bird community, including its richness and composition, and having established a baseline description to monitor the dynamics and phenology of the community over time. The aim is to be able to link this data to environmental drivers of dynamics.
  • Robson
  • Birds
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2012-05-14
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.198.22

McKeown; Westcott

CSIRO

Bird Survey Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2014
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standardised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 3 points along a 400m site for which birds are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at ~50m asl at the James Cook University Daintree Rainforest Observatory (TERN FNQ Supersite, Cape Tribulation node) at which biannual avifauna surveys will be conducted by The College of Marine and Environmental Sciences (CMES) at James Cook University (JCU) has a Memorandum of Understanding between TERN FNQ Rainforest SuperSite.
  • CTBCC
  • Climate change
  • Wet Tropics
  • TERN
  • DRO
  • JCU
  • Williams
  • Cape Tribulation
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Birds
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2014-12-04
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.13.7

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Bird Survey Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2010
Westcott
CSIRO
This project is documenting the distribution of bird species and the structure of bird communities at the TERN 25 Ha Plot at Robson Creek. The advantage of using the Plot as a point of focus is that the mapping and plant community data provide a phenological and ecological context for interpreting drivers of the bird community at that site.
  • Birds
  • Assemblage
  • Diversity
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2015-12-13
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.483.4

Westcott

CSIRO

Bird Survey Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2011
Westcott
CSIRO
This project is documenting the distribution of bird species and the structure of bird communities at the TERN 25 Ha Plot at Robson Creek. The advantage of using the Plot as a point of focus is that the mapping and plant community data provide a phenological and ecological context for interpreting drivers of the bird community at that site.
  • Birds
  • Assemblage
  • Diversity
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2015-12-13
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.485.4

Westcott

CSIRO

Bird Survey Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2012
Westcott
CSIRO
This project is documenting the distribution of bird species and the structure of bird communities at the TERN 25 Ha Plot at Robson Creek. The advantage of using the Plot as a point of focus is that the mapping and plant community data provide a phenological and ecological context for interpreting drivers of the bird community at that site.
  • Birds
  • Assemblage
  • Diversity
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2015-12-13
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.487.4

Westcott

CSIRO

Bird Survey Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2013
Ford
CSIRO
This project is documenting the distribution of bird species and the structure of bird communities at the TERN 25 Ha Plot at Robson Creek. The advantage of using the Plot as a point of focus is that the mapping and plant community data provide a phenological and ecological context for interpreting drivers of the bird community at that site. The Robson Creek plot site was chosen because being situated at c. 700m it represents a ‘tension’ zone between different tropical forest communities that are likely to show shifts under climate change. Bird communities below 600-800m can be characterised as current lowland, warm climate communities while those above 600-800m take on species with upland distributions, e.g. golden bowerbireds. grey-headed robins and fernwrens. Robson Creek being situated at the current altitudinal boundaries of the distribution of the upland and lowland specialist species consequently represents an ideal site for monitoring the species and community responses to climate change over time. In this project we are interested in species and community responses to climate change in three contexts. First, at the species level we are interested in how individual species respond in abundance and seasonality. Second, at the community level we are interested in i) describing changes in species distribution, ii) the effects of this on community composition and structure and iii) how this varies through the year.
  • bird survey
  • birds
  • avian
  • fauna
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQR
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2015-08-03
 
Last updated
2016-09-12
 
docid
supersite.190.2

Ford

CSIRO

Bird Survey Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2014
Ford
CSIRO
This project is documenting the distribution of bird species and the structure of bird communities at the TERN 25 Ha Plot at Robson Creek. The advantage of using the Plot as a point of focus is that the mapping and plant community data provide a phenological and ecological context for interpreting drivers of the bird community at that site. The Robson Creek plot site was chosen because being situated at c. 700m it represents a ‘tension’ zone between different tropical forest communities that are likely to show shifts under climate change. Bird communities below 600-800m can be characterised as current lowland, warm climate communities while those above 600-800m take on species with upland distributions, e.g. golden bowerbireds. grey-headed robins and fernwrens. Robson Creek being situated at the current altitudinal boundaries of the distribution of the upland and lowland specialist species consequently represents an ideal site for monitoring the species and community responses to climate change over time. In this project we are interested in species and community responses to climate change in three contexts. First, at the species level we are interested in how individual species respond in abundance and seasonality. Second, at the community level we are interested in i) describing changes in species distribution, ii) the effects of this on community composition and structure and iii) how this varies through the year.
  • bird survey
  • birds
  • fauna
  • avian
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQR
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2015-08-03
 
Last updated
2016-09-12
 
docid
supersite.188.4

Ford

CSIRO

Bird Survey Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2015
Ford
CSIRO
This project is documenting the distribution of bird species and the structure of bird communities at the TERN 25 Ha Plot at Robson Creek. The advantage of using the Plot as a point of focus is that the mapping and plant community data provide a phenological and ecological context for interpreting drivers of the bird community at that site. The Robson Creek plot site was chosen because being situated at c. 700m it represents a ‘tension’ zone between different tropical forest communities that are likely to show shifts under climate change. Bird communities below 600-800m can be characterised as current lowland, warm climate communities while those above 600-800m take on species with upland distributions, e.g. golden bowerbireds. grey-headed robins and fernwrens. Robson Creek being situated at the current altitudinal boundaries of the distribution of the upland and lowland specialist species consequently represents an ideal site for monitoring the species and community responses to climate change over time. In this project we are interested in species and community responses to climate change in three contexts. First, at the species level we are interested in how individual species respond in abundance and seasonality. Second, at the community level we are interested in i) describing changes in species distribution, ii) the effects of this on community composition and structure and iii) how this varies through the year.
  • bird survey
  • birds
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQR
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2015-06-08
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.152.7

Ford

CSIRO

Coarse Woody Debris, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2014
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Following the general ASN Monitoring protocol (Annexure 1, TERN Australian SuperSite Network, NCRIS-2013 Monitoring Protocols, NCRIS-2013 Annexure1 Ver1_1_4.pdf) the length and diameter at both ends of all pieces of fallen wood, including lianas, with diameter larger than 10 cm within the 1 ha plot were measured. Pieces of coarse woody debris (CWD) which may consist of one or more segments were tagged, and segments measured.
  • coarse woody debris
  • cwd
  • vegetation
  • FNQR
  • Daintree
  • Cape Tribulation
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  2  
Published
2016-04-10
 
Last updated
2017-02-19
 
docid
supersite.638.7

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Coarse Woody Debris, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2015
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Following the general ASN Monitoring protocol (Annexure 1, TERN Australian SuperSite Network, NCRIS-2013 Monitoring Protocols, NCRIS-2013 Annexure1 Ver1_1_4.pdf) the length and diameter at both ends of all pieces of fallen wood, including lianas, with diameter larger than 10 cm within the 1 ha plot were measured. Pieces of coarse woody debris (CWD) which may consist of one or more segments were tagged, and segments measured.
  • coarse woody debris
  • cwd
  • vegetation
  • FNQR
  • Daintree
  • Cape Tribulation
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  2  
Published
2016-04-10
 
Last updated
2017-02-19
 
docid
supersite.640.8

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Coarse Woody Debris, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2016
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Coarse Woody Debris data was collected as described in SuperSites Vegetation Monitoring Protocols (http://www.tern-supersites.net.au/images/resource/SuperSites_Vegetation_Monitoring_Protocols_Ver1.22.pdf) http://dx.doi.org/10.4227/05/56134C1310F16. Pieces of Coarse Woody Debris (CWD) which may consist of one or more segments were tagged, and segments measured. The length and diameter at both ends of all pieces of fallen wood, including lianas, with diameter larger than 10 cm within the Core 1 ha vegetation plot were measured.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • coarse woody debris
  • cwd
  • vegetation
  • FNQR
  • Daintree
  • Cape Tribulation
  2  
Published
2017-02-19
 
Last updated
2017-02-19
 
docid
supersite.816.3

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Coarse Woody Debris, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2012
Bradford
CSIRO
The Robson Creek 25 ha rainforest plot is situated on the Atherton Tablelands in Far North Queensland. It is part of the TERN FNQ Rainforest SuperSite. The following data is collected from the core hectare 6 within the 25 ha plot. LAI and photopoints are done at the end of each wet and dry season. The vascularplant survey and six gentry transects were done in 2012. Coarse woody debris is done each year.
  • 0705
  • coarse woody debris
  • biomass
  • Far North Queensland
  • Robson Creek
  • rainforest
  • FNQR
  1  
Published
2015-12-14
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.491.5

Bradford

CSIRO

Coarse Woody Debris, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2013
Bradford
CSIRO
The Robson Creek 25 ha rainforest plot is situated on the Atherton Tablelands in Far North Queensland. It is part of the TERN FNQ Rainforest SuperSite. The following data is collected from the core hectare 6 within the 25 ha plot. LAI and photopoints are done at the end of each wet and dry season. The vascularplant survey and six gentry transects were done in 2012. Coarse woody debris is done each year.
  • 0705
  • coarse woody debris
  • biomass
  • Far North Queensland
  • Robson Creek
  • rainforest
  • FNQR
  1  
Published
2015-12-14
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.493.3

Bradford

CSIRO

Coarse Woody Debris, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2014
Bradford
CSIRO
The Robson Creek 25 ha rainforest plot is situated on the Atherton Tablelands in Far North Queensland. It is part of the TERN FNQ Rainforest SuperSite. The following data is collected from the core hectare 6 within the 25 ha plot. Coarse woody debris is done each year.
  • forest dynamics
  • biomass
  • Far North Queensland
  • Robson Creek
  • rainforest
  • FNQR
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-08-30
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.233.4

Bradford

CSIRO

Distributions and ecology of rain forest vertebrates in the Australian Wet Tropics
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change
Contextual data for the FNQ Rainforest Supersite. The purpose of this data set (https://research.jcu.edu.au/researchdata/default/detail/10da1ccac69a13c5d5628b7510b26cf5/) was to compile distributional, general life-history characteristics and phylogenies for Australian tropical rain forest vertebrates to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity patterns and to assess the impacts of global climate change. We provide three distinct data sets: (1) a table of species-specific distributional and life-history traits for 242 vertebrate species found in the rain forests of the Australian Wet Tropics; (2) species distribution maps (GIS raster files) for 202 of the species displaying both the realized and potential distributions; and (3) phylogenies for these species. These species represent 93 birds, 31 amphibians, 31 mammals (including one monotreme), and 47 reptiles. Where information exists, the distributional and life-history data compiled here present information on: indices of environmental specialization (ENFA), habitat specialization, average body mass and size, sexual dimorphism, reproductive characteristics such as age at first reproduction, clutch/litter size, number of reproductive bouts per year and breeding seasonality, longevity, time of day when most active, and dispersal ability; distributional characteristics such as range size (potential and realized for both total and core ranges) and observed ranges in temperature, precipitation, and elevation; and niche attributes such as environmental marginality and specialization. The distribution maps provided represent a combination of presence-only ecological niche modeling (using MaxEnt) to estimate the potential distribution of a species followed by biogeographic clipping by expert opinion based on extensive field data and a subregional classification relevant to the topography and biogeographic history of the region to produce best-possible estimates of the realized distribution. Our assemblage contains many species with a shared evolutionary history, and thus many analyses of these data will need to account for phylogeny. Although a comprehensive phylogeny with branch length information does not exist for this diverse group of species, we present a best-estimate composite phylogeny constructed primarily from recently published molecular phylogenies of included groups.
  • distribution
  • rain forest vertebrates
  • life history
  • Australia Wet Tropics
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2012-08-29
 
Last updated
2015-11-26
 
docid
lloyd.235.15

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change

Fruit Phenology, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 25 ha Plot, 2011
Bradford
CSIRO
Fruit phenology survey on the Robson Creek 25 ha plot commenced in July 2011 and was carried out by Matt Bradford (CSIRO, Atherton). Three transects were established. Transect 1 from 100 m, 100 m to 400 m, 100 m. Transect 2 from 100 m, 200 m to 400 m, 200 m. Transect 3 from 100 m, 300 m to 400 m, 300 m. Transects were 300 m in length and 5 m in width (2.5 m either side of the centre line). All ripe fruit on and above the ground within the confines of the transect was counted or estimated. Surveys were conducted in the last last week of each month. If a tagged individual was fruiting, the tag number was recorded. If an untagged individual was fruiting, the distance along the transect and the species was recorded. Data collection is ongoing.
  • phenology
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-12-14
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.507.3

Bradford

CSIRO

Fruit Phenology, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 25 ha Plot, 2012
Bradford
CSIRO
Fruit phenology survey on the Robson Creek 25 ha plot commenced in July 2011 and was carried out by Matt Bradford (CSIRO, Atherton). Three transects were established. Transect 1 from 100 m, 100 m to 400 m, 100 m. Transect 2 from 100 m, 200 m to 400 m, 200 m. Transect 3 from 100 m, 300 m to 400 m, 300 m. Transects were 300 m in length and 5 m in width (2.5 m either side of the centre line). All ripe fruit on and above the ground within the confines of the transect was counted or estimated. Surveys were conducted in the last last week of each month. If a tagged individual was fruiting, the tag number was recorded. If an untagged individual was fruiting, the distance along the transect and the species was recorded. Data collection is ongoing.
  • phenology
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-12-14
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.509.4

Bradford

CSIRO

Fruit Phenology, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 25 ha Plot, 2013
Bradford
CSIRO
Fruit phenology survey on the Robson Creek 25 ha plot commenced in July 2011 and was carried out by Matt Bradford (CSIRO, Atherton). Three transects were established. Transect 1 from 100 m, 100 m to 400 m, 100 m. Transect 2 from 100 m, 200 m to 400 m, 200 m. Transect 3 from 100 m, 300 m to 400 m, 300 m. Transects were 300 m in length and 5 m in width (2.5 m either side of the centre line). All ripe fruit on and above the ground within the confines of the transect was counted or estimated. Surveys were conducted in the last last week of each month. If a tagged individual was fruiting, the tag number was recorded. If an untagged individual was fruiting, the distance along the transect and the species was recorded. Data collection is ongoing.
  • phenology
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-12-14
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.511.3

Bradford

CSIRO

Fruit Phenology, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 25 ha Plot, 2014
Bradford
CSIRO
Fruit phenology survey on the Robson Creek 25 ha plot commenced in July 2011 and was carried out by Matt Bradford (CSIRO, Atherton). Three transects were established. Transect 1 from 100 m, 100 m to 400 m, 100 m. Transect 2 from 100 m, 200 m to 400 m, 200 m. Transect 3 from 100 m, 300 m to 400 m, 300 m. Transects were 300 m in length and 5 m in width (2.5 m either side of the centre line). All ripe fruit on and above the ground within the confines of the transect was counted or estimated. Surveys were conducted in the last last week of each month. If a tagged individual was fruiting, the tag number was recorded. If an untagged individual was fruiting, the distance along the transect and the species was recorded. Data collection is ongoing.
  • phenology
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-12-14
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.513.3

Bradford

CSIRO

Fruit Phenology, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 25 ha Plot, 2015
Bradford
CSIRO
Fruit phenology survey on the Robson Creek 25 ha plot commenced in July 2011 and was carried out by Matt Bradford (CSIRO, Atherton). Three transects were established. Transect 1 from 100 m, 100 m to 400 m, 100 m. Transect 2 from 100 m, 200 m to 400 m, 200 m. Transect 3 from 100 m, 300 m to 400 m, 300 m. Transects were 300 m in length and 5 m in width (2.5 m either side of the centre line). All ripe fruit on and above the ground within the confines of the transect was counted or estimated. Surveys were conducted in the last last week of each month. If a tagged individual was fruiting, the tag number was recorded. If an untagged individual was fruiting, the distance along the transect and the species was recorded. Data collection is ongoing.
  • phenology
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-12-14
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.515.3

Bradford

CSIRO

General Vegetation Description, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2014
Liddell; Laurance
James Cook University Cairns Campus
A once-off general structural description was conducted according to the National Vegetation Information System (NVIS) level 5 (Australian Vegetation Attribute Manual, 2003), (http://www.environment.gov.au/topics/science-and-research/databases-and-maps/national-vegetation-information-system) . For trees (10-30m) the dominant genera were Endiandra and Normanbya. For shrubs (2-10m) the dominant genera was Licula and for saplings (1-2m), the dominant genera was Toechima. The most common species for the site were Endiandra microneura, Cardwellia sublimus and Normanbya normanbyi.
  • panoramic photopoint images
  • photopoint
  • images
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest
  • Daintree
  • Cape Tribulation
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-09-01
 
Last updated
2016-10-17
 
docid
supersite.242.7

Liddell; Laurance

James Cook University Cairns Campus

General Vegetation Description, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2014
Bradford
CSIRO
The Robson Creek 25 ha rainforest plot is situated on the Atherton Tablelands in Far North Queensland. It is part of the TERN FNQ Rainforest SuperSite. The following data is collected from the core hectare 6 within the 25 ha plot. LAI and photopoints are done at the end of each wet and dry season. The vascularplant survey and six gentry transects were done in 2012. Coarse woody debris is done each year. Data for stems > 10 cm DBH can be found in the dataset - Vascular Plant Data > 10 cm DBH, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 25 ha plot, 2009-2012.
  • forest dynamics
  • biomass
  • Far North Queensland
  • Robson Creek
  • rainforest
  • FNQR
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-08-30
 
Last updated
2016-09-12
 
docid
supersite.235.4

Bradford

CSIRO

Gentry Survey, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2012
Bradford
CSIRO
The Robson Creek 25 ha rainforest plot is situated on the Atherton Tablelands in Far North Queensland. It is part of the TERN FNQ Rainforest SuperSite. The following data is collected from the core hectare 6 within the 25 ha plot. LAI and photopoints are done at the end of each wet and dry season. The vascularplant survey and six gentry transects were done in 2012. Coarse woody debris is done each year.
  • 0705
  • forest dynamics
  • gentry survey
  • biomass
  • Far North Queensland
  • Robson Creek
  • rainforest
  • FNQR
  3  
Published
2015-12-14
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.495.3

Bradford

CSIRO

Invertebrate Fauna Survey, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 25 Ha Plot, 2013
Kitching
Griffith University
Tree species related heterogeneity of insects was examined at the Robson Creek 25 ha site. 50 individual understorey trees were identified and flying insects associated with their canopies were sampled. Miniature interception traps were deployed over a one week period in April 2013. Five individuals of each of 10 species of trees were targeted. Targeted trees were chosen as generic pairs with one member of the genus being among the more abundant species on the 25 ha plot, the other being 'rare' on the plot. Each pair of species belonged to a different botanical family. Species targeted were: Elaeocarpaceae, Sapindaceae, Myrtaceae, Araliaceae and Lauraceae.
  • insects
  • interception traps
  • tropical rainforest
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2013-06-21
 
Last updated
2015-01-13
 
docid
lloyd.529.3

Kitching

Griffith University

Leaf Area Index Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2014
Liddell; Laurance
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Using the methodology outlined in the TERN NCRIS2013 Annexure (http://dx.doi.org/10.4227/05/56134C1310F16), average LAI for the FNQ Cape Tribulation site was determined to be 3.2 and ranged between 1.4 and 4.4
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • 0705
  • LAI
  • leaf area index
  • FNQR
  • Daintree
  • Cape Tribulation
  2  
Published
2015-08-31
 
Last updated
2017-03-13
 
docid
supersite.238.13

Liddell; Laurance

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Leaf Area Index Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1ha, 2015
Liddell; Laurance
James Cook University Cairns Campus
The Leaf Area Index of the FNQ Rainforest SuperSite - Cape Tribulation Core 1 Ha was calculated using the Digital Hemispheric Photography methodology outlined in the TERN NCRIS2013 Annexure (http://dx.doi.org/10.4227/05/56134C1310F16).
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • 0705
  • LAI
  • leaf area index
  • FNQR
  • Daintree
  • Cape Tribulation
  2  
Published
2016-04-10
 
Last updated
2016-05-09
 
docid
supersite.643.4

Liddell; Laurance

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Leaf Area Index Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2016
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
The Leaf Area Index of the FNQ Rainforest SuperSite - Cape Tribulation Core 1 ha was calculated using the Digital Hemispheric Photography methodology outlined in the TERN NCRIS2013 Annexure (http://dx.doi.org/10.4227/05/56134C1310F16).
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • 0705
  • LAI
  • leaf area index
  • FNQR
  • Daintree
  • Cape Tribulation
  1  
Published
2017-02-15
 
Last updated
2017-02-15
 
docid
supersite.811.3

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Leaf Area Index Data, FNQ Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2014
Bradford
CSIRO
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange (Bréda, 2003). Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns (Walker et al. 1981). These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and as a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as DCP (digital cover photography) and DHP (digital hemispheric photography). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital hemispheric Photography was carried out at the Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek Core 1 ha vegetation plot.
  • LAI
  • leaf area index
  • FNQR
  • Robson Creek
  • digital cover photography
  • 0502
  1  
Published
2015-06-02
 
Last updated
2017-02-10
 
docid
supersite.150.8

Bradford

CSIRO

Leaf Area Index Images, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2014
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP)was carried out at the Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 Ha on 18 Sept 2014. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/fnqr_daintree/capetrib
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • FNQR
  • foliage protection cover
  • crown cover
  • cover porosity
  • Leaf Area Index
  • Digital Hemispheric Photography
  • Cape Tribulation
  1  
Published
2016-11-27
 
Last updated
2017-02-13
 
docid
supersite.736.5
Leaf Area Index Images, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2015
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP) was carried out at the Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 Ha on 24 Nov 2015. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/fnqr_daintree/capetrib
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • FNQR
  • foliage protection cover
  • crown cover
  • cover porosity
  • Leaf Area Index
  • Digital Hemispheric Photography
  • Cape Tribulation
  1  
Published
2016-11-27
 
Last updated
2017-02-13
 
docid
supersite.737.4
Leaf Area Index Images, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2016
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP) was carried out at the Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 Ha on 1 Dec 2016. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/fnqr_daintree/capetrib
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • FNQR
  • foliage protection cover
  • crown cover
  • cover porosity
  • Leaf Area Index
  • Digital Hemispheric Photography
  • Cape Tribulation
  1  
Published
2017-02-15
 
Last updated
2017-02-15
 
docid
supersite.810.2
Leaf Area Index Images, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2016
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP) was carried out at the Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 Ha on 1 Jun 2016. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/fnqr_robson/default
  • FNQR
  • foliage protection cover
  • crown cover
  • cover porosity
  • Leaf Area Index
  • Digital Hemispheric Photography
  • Robson Creek
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2016-11-27
 
Last updated
2017-02-13
 
docid
supersite.738.3
Leaf Level Physiology, Chemistry and Structural Traits, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2012
Atkin
The Australian National University
Objectives: (1). Quantify rates of leaf respiration (both in darkness and in the light) and associated leaf traits in a wide range of tropical tree species (2) Establish the extent to which rates of leaf respiration and associated traits change in response to changes in light availability within the canopy. (3). Quantify the temperature dependence of leaf respiration of tropical tree species, using leaves sampled from the top and lower positions of the canopy. Experimental design and methods: In September 2010, we surveyed rates of light-saturated photosynthesis (measured at ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations), leaf respiratory CO2 release (both in darkness and in the light) and related leaf traits (area:mass ratios, and concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus and soluble/insoluble carbohydrates) in 16 tropical species growing at the Cape Tribulation Canopy Crane site. Leaves were sampled at two positions in the canopy (sun-exposed/top-canopy and shade-leaves/lower canopy). Light response curves of leaf CO2 exchange were used to calculate rates of leaf respiration in the light (using the ‘Kok’ method). We will also quantified short-term temperature dependences of leaf respiration in the upper and lower canopy leaves.
  • photosynthesis
  • leaf respiration
  • leaf nitrogen
  • leaf phosphorus
  • carbohydrates
  • sugar
  • starch
  • temperature
  • light
  • shade
  • irradiance
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2012-12-19
 
Last updated
2016-07-31
 
docid
lloyd.258.24

Atkin

The Australian National University

Leaf Level Physiology, Chemistry and Structural Traits, Far North Queensland SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2012
Weerasinghe; Atkin; Furstenau Togashi; Liddell; Prentice
The Australian National University; Macquarie University; James Cook University Cairns Campus
Objectives: Set-up of AI curves, N, P and LMA values for dominant species. Establish the extent to which rates of respiration in the light change in response to associated traits and to climatic moisture in Robson Creek. Experimental design and methods: In August 2012, we surveyed AI curves and related leaf traits (area:mass ratios, and concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus) in 14 tropical species growing at the Robson Creek TERN site. Leaves were sampled from different trees ranging from 1 to 4 replicates per species from 9 species and 1-2 replicates per species from 5 species. Light response curves of leaf CO2 exchange were used to calculate rates of leaf respiration in the light (using the ‘Kok’ method).
  • photosynthesis
  • leaf respiration
  • leaf nitrogen
  • leaf phosphorus
  • AI curves
  • Rlight
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0607
  2  
Published
2013-05-31
 
Last updated
2016-11-24
 
docid
lloyd.490.12

Weerasinghe; Atkin; Furstenau Togashi; Liddell; Prentice

The Australian National University; Macquarie University; James Cook University Cairns Campus

Leaf Traits, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2010
Atkin
Australian National University
Key leaf traits describing leaf structure, chemistry and metabolism.
  • leaf traits
  • photosynthesis
  • respiration
  • nitrogen
  • phosphorus
  • leaf mass per unit area
  • FNQR
  • Daintree
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest
  • 0607
  • 0602
  • 0606
  1  
Published
2017-05-31
 
Last updated
2017-05-31
 
docid
supersite.859.6

Atkin

Australian National University

Leaf Traits, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2014
Atkin
Australian National University
Key leaf traits describing leaf structure, chemistry and metabolism.
  • leaf traits
  • photosynthesis
  • respiration
  • nitrogen
  • phosphorus
  • leaf mass per unit area
  • FNQR
  • Daintree
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest
  • 0606
  • 0607
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2017-05-31
 
Last updated
2017-05-31
 
docid
supersite.861.3

Atkin

Australian National University

Monthly Distributions of Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius) in Australia, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, CTBCC, 1950-2011
Vanderwal
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change
Contextual data for the FNQ Rainforest Supersite. his is the monthly distributions of Cassowary (Casuarius casuarius) in Australia (https://research.jcu.edu.au/researchdata/default/detail/bba7da507894f7e50300113230f2873c/). The monthly times time steps were created using the methods defined in Reside et al (2010). Over 14 million occurrence records of 950+ Australian bird species were collated across the period 1950 to 2011 from personal, public and institutional databases. Only species with >20 unique spatiotemporal records were used for modelling. Daily precipitation and temperature minima and maxima from 1950 until 2011 at a 0.05° grid scale were accessed from the Australian Water Availability Project (AWAP -- http://www.bom.gov.au/jsp/awap/) (Jones et al 2007, Grant et al 2008). From this, we calculated annual mean temperature, temperature seasonality, max and min monthly temperature, annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality, and precipitation of the wettest and driest quarters at time lags of three, six, nine and twelve months previous to each month that a bird was recorded within the period 1950 to 2011. However, initial models and work reported in Reside et al (2010), we only used the 12 month time lag. Species distribution models were run using the presence-only modelling program Maxent (Phillips et al 2006). Maxent uses species presence records to statistically relate species occurrence to environmental variables on the principle of maximum entropy. The model weather data consisted of each unique combination of month, year, latitude and longitude of each bird sighting, and the corresponding weather for each relevant time period. All default settings were used except for background point allocation. We used a target group background (Phillips & Dudik 2008) to remove any spatial or temporal sampling bias in the modelling exercise.
  • vertebrate
  • Australian Wet Tropics
  • insect sampling
  • species distribution
  • abundance
  • invertebrate specimens
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2012-08-29
 
Last updated
2016-10-30
 
docid
lloyd.234.13

Vanderwal

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change

Monthly Distributions of Gouldian Finch (Erythrura gouldiae) in Northern Australia, CTBCC, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, 1950-2011
Vanderwal
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change
Contextual data for the FNQ Rainforest Supersite. This is the monthly distributions of Gouldian Finch (Erythrura gouldiae) in Australia (https://research.jcu.edu.au/researchdata/default/detail/8a37d7d34217a877947f6b88252d0582/). The monthly times time steps were created using the methods defined in Reside et al (2010). Over 14 million occurrence records of 950+ Australian bird species were collated across the period 1950 to 2011 from personal, public and institutional databases. Only species with >20 unique spatiotemporal records were used for modelling. Daily precipitation and temperature minima and maxima from 1950 until 2011 at a 0.05° grid scale were accessed from the Australian Water Availability Project (AWAP -- http://www.bom.gov.au/jsp/awap/) (Jones et al 2007, Grant et al 2008). From this, we calculated annual mean temperature, temperature seasonality, max and min monthly temperature, annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality, and precipitation of the wettest and driest quarters at time lags of three, six, nine and twelve months previous to each month that a bird was recorded within the period 1950 to 2011. However, initial models and work reported in Reside et al (2010), we only used the 12 month time lag. Species distribution models were run using the presence-only modelling program Maxent (Phillips et al 2006). Maxent uses species presence records to statistically relate species occurrence to environmental variables on the principle of maximum entropy. The model weather data consisted of each unique combination of month, year, latitude and longitude of each bird sighting, and the corresponding weather for each relevant time period. All default settings were used except for background point allocation. We used a target group background (Phillips & Dudik 2008) to remove any spatial or temporal sampling bias in the modelling exercise.
  • species distribution
  • erythrura gouldiae
  • gouldian finch
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0501
  0  
Published
2012-08-29
 
Last updated
2015-10-15
 
docid
lloyd.231.17

Vanderwal

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change

Moth Inventory at Canopy and Ground Level, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2009
Kitching
Griffith University
Moth are a hyper diverse and ecologically important group and are good candidates as indicators for rapid categorisation and monitoring of habitat quality and change. Moths have been used as indicators in a variety of diferent terrestrial ecosystems, such as rainforests, temperate forests and agri-ecosystems. We sampled the moth assemblages at canopy and ground level at five sites within a 25 ha plot, at Robson Creek, Atherton. Two Pennsylvania light traps were run simultaneously on each trapping night, with one trap at ground level and one in the canopy. Vertical stratification of moth species, between the ground and canopy levels, can result in distinct ground and canopy fauna. Putting light traps at both the ground and canopy ensured the widest sampling of moth diversity (Beck et al., 2002). The preliminary results here are significant differences in the moth assemblages at the canopy and ground levels. Further analysis investigating the taxonomic composition of canopy and ground assemblages is underway.
  • Lepidoptera
  • vertical stratification
  • tropical rainforest
  • canopy
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2012-02-20
 
Last updated
2017-02-15
 
docid
lloyd.52.35

Kitching

Griffith University

Moth Inventory at Canopy and Ground Level, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2010
Kitching
Griffith University
Moth are a hyper diverse and ecologically important group and are good candidates as indicators for rapid categorisation and monitoring of habitat quality and change. Moths have been used as indicators in a variety of diferent terrestrial ecosystems, such as rainforests, temperate forests and agri-ecosystems. We sampled the moth assemblages at canopy and ground level at five sites within a 25 ha plot, at Robson Creek, Atherton. Two Pennsylvania light traps were run simultaneously on each trapping night, with one trap at ground level and one in the canopy. Vertical stratification of moth species, between the ground and canopy levels, can result in distinct ground and canopy fauna. Putting light traps at both the ground and canopy ensured the widest sampling of moth diversity (Beck et al., 2002). The preliminary results here are significant differences in the moth assemblages at the canopy and ground levels. Further analysis investigating the taxonomic composition of canopy and ground assemblages is underway.
  • Lepidoptera
  • vertical stratification
  • tropical rainforest
  • canopy
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2012-02-21
 
Last updated
2017-02-15
 
docid
lloyd.73.22

Kitching

Griffith University

Moth Inventory at Canopy and Ground Level, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2011
Kitching
Griffith University
Moth are a hyper diverse and ecologically important group and are good candidates as indicators for rapid categorisation and monitoring of habitat quality and change. Moths have been used as indicators in a variety of diferent terrestrial ecosystems, such as rainforests, temperate forests and agri-ecosystems. We sampled the moth assemblages at canopy and ground level at five sites within a 25 ha plot, at Robson Creek, Atherton. Two Pennsylvania light traps were run simultaneously on each trapping night, with one trap at ground level and one in the canopy. Vertical stratification of moth species, between the ground and canopy levels, can result in distinct ground and canopy fauna. Putting light traps at both the ground and canopy ensured the widest sampling of moth diversity (Beck et al., 2002). The preliminary results here are significant differences in the moth assemblages at the canopy and ground levels. Further analysis investigating the taxonomic composition of canopy and ground assemblages is underway.
  • Lepidoptera
  • vertical stratification
  • tropical rainforest
  • canopy
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2012-02-21
 
Last updated
2017-02-15
 
docid
lloyd.75.22

Kitching

Griffith University

Panorama Photopoint Images, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2015
Liddell; Laurance
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Using the methodology outlined in the TERN NCRIS2013 Annexure, panoramic photopoint images were taken within the Daintree Rainforest Observatory Supersite
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • 0705
  • photopoint images
  • 5 point photopoint
  • FNQR
  • Daintree
  • Cape Tribulation
  1  
Published
2015-09-01
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.240.9

Liddell; Laurance

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Phenocamera Images, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Discovery Centre. Cow Bay, 2013
Liddell; Brown
James Cook University Cairns Campus; Australian National University, Research School of Biology
A network enabled phenology monitoring camera (“Phenocam”) was installed in 2013 at the Daintree Discovery Centre site to provide phenological and monitoring data for this location. See http://phenocam.anu.edu.au/TERN_Discovery_01.html
  • phenocamera
  • phenocam
  • phenology
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Daintree Discovery Centre
  0  
Published
2014-05-27
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
lloyd.649.11

Liddell; Brown

James Cook University Cairns Campus; Australian National University, Research School of Biology

Photopoint Images, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2014
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Photopoint images were collected 16 Sept 2014 at each corner and centre of the Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree, Cape Tribulation Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree, Cape Tribulation Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/fnqr_daintree/capetrib
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Cape Tribulation
  • Rainforest
  • Core 1 ha
  • Photography
  • Daintree
  2  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-13
 
docid
supersite.802.3

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Photopoint Images, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2012
Bradford
CSIRO
Photopoint images were collected 1 Nov 2012 at each corner and centre of the Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/fnqr_robson/default
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  • Rainforest
  • Core 1 ha
  • Photography
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.799.2

Bradford

CSIRO

Photopoint Images, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2014
Bradford
CSIRO
Photopoint images were collected 1 Sept 2014 at each corner and centre of the Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/fnqr_robson/default
  • forest dynamics
  • biomass
  • Far North Queensland
  • Robson Creek
  • rainforest
  • FNQR
  • 0705
  6  
Published
2015-05-20
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.75.9

Bradford

CSIRO

Photopoint Images, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2015
Bradford
CSIRO
Photopoint images were collected 1 Nov 2015 at each corner and centre of the Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/fnqr_robson/default
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  • Rainforest
  • Core 1 ha
  • Photography
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.800.2

Bradford

CSIRO

Photopoint Images, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2016
Bradford
CSIRO
Photopoint images were collected 1 May and 6 Dec 2016 at each corner and centre of the Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/fnqr_robson/default
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  • Rainforest
  • Core 1 ha
  • Photography
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.801.2

Bradford

CSIRO

Rainforest Vertebrate Fauna (Locations & Abundances) of the Australian Wet Tropics, CTBCC, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, 1994-2020
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change
Contextual data for the FNQ Rainforest Supersite. Distributional data for the rain forest vertebrates of the AWT was collected during field intensive surveys and collated from the literature and institutional databases (as per Williams 2006). Major sources of species occurrences included: field intensive surveys by various researchers in the School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, from which the data is now maintained and continued monitoring standard survey sites is done by the Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University; Birds Australia Atlas of Australian Birds; QPWS Wildnet fauna database; and individual biologists (see special reference section of Williams et al. 1996). All occurrences were vetted for positional and taxonomic accuracy prior to use in modelling. (https://research.jcu.edu.au/researchdata/default/detail/2191af28cae2be65371fef4531cf2d7f/) This research has been funded in full or part by the funding agencies: - Skyrail Rainforest Foundation - Birds Australia - Earthwatch Institute - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF) - National Environmental Research Program (NERP) - Rainforest CRC - Australian Research Council - James Cook University Research Advancement Program (RAP) - Wet Tropics Management Authority (WTMA) - National Geographic - National Science Foundation - Queensland Smart State Program
  • vertebrate
  • Australian Wet Tropics
  • insect sampling
  • species distribution
  • abundance
  • invertebrate specimens
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2012-08-29
 
Last updated
2015-11-26
 
docid
lloyd.228.16

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change

Seedling Survey, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2010
Green
La Trobe University
The aim of the Seedling Survey was to document the diversity and patterns of relative species abundances from a sample of seedlings. For this survey, a seedling was defined as any stem ≥ 15 cm in height, and ≤ 1 cm diameter at breast height (130 cm), and thus included not only tree seedlings, but also herbs, shrubs and vines. A total of 169 seedling transects (hereafter Lines) was established using the 20 m grid established by CSIRO. Each line is nominally 20 m long (the distance between white plastic posts), and to 1 m wide to the east of the line between the posts. The 169 Lines are arranged in a 13 x 13 m grid. All Lines are oriented south-north, with the start of each Line at the southern end. For a complete listing of Line coordinates, see Robson_20M_Transect_Coords.csv.
  • Seedling Survey
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0705
  3  
Published
2015-12-10
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.463.4

Green

La Trobe University

Seedling Survey, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2011
Green
La Trobe University
The aim of the Seedling Survey was to document the diversity and patterns of relative species abundances from a sample of seedlings. For this survey, a seedling was defined as any stem ≥ 15 cm in height, and ≤ 1 cm diameter at breast height (130 cm), and thus included not only tree seedlings, but also herbs, shrubs and vines. A total of 169 seedling transects (hereafter Lines) was established using the 20 m grid established by CSIRO. Each line is nominally 20 m long (the distance between white plastic posts), and to 1 m wide to the east of the line between the posts. The 169 Lines are arranged in a 13 x 13 m grid. All Lines are oriented south-north, with the start of each Line at the southern end. For a complete listing of Line coordinates, see Robson_20M_Transect_Coords.csv.
  • Seedling Survey
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0705
  3  
Published
2015-12-10
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.467.3

Green

La Trobe University

Sensor Data, Depth to Water Table, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Bore 1, 2014
Liddell; Nelson
James Cook University
Bore 1 was drilled commencing 19th May 2008. Drilling was carried out using the rotary mud technique, the bore were installed as far into the forest as possible as the drill platform allowed. Drilling reached the watertable at ~10 m depth and bedrock at ~12 m depth. The drill hole was 200 mm diameter to 12m depth and then155 mm diameter to the bottom (14.2m). The casing used was UPVC PN12, 125 mm ID, from 0.30 m above ground to 14.2 m depth. Above ground the casing was enclosed in a steel tube (0.30m) with a lockable cap. The casing was slotted (1.2 mm) from 4.5 m to 14.2 m depth. There was no cap at the base (in rock). Filling: cement grout 0-2 m depth, drill cuttings 2-4 m depth, bentonite 4-4.5 m, gravel 4.5-12 m (rock), packer at 12m (top of rock), open hole 12-14.2 m. A water level logger was installed that logged data every 30 minutes during 2014.
  • bore
  • groundwater
  • water table depth
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • DRO
  • Cape Tribulation
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-12-08
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.449.4

Liddell; Nelson

James Cook University

Sensor Data, Depth to Water Table, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Bore 1, 2015
Liddell; Nelson
James Cook University
Bore 1 was drilled commencing 19th May 2008. Drilling was carried out using the rotary mud technique, the bore were installed as far into the forest as possible as the drill platform allowed. Drilling reached the watertable at ~10 m depth and bedrock at ~12 m depth. The drill hole was 200 mm diameter to 12m depth and then155 mm diameter to the bottom (14.2m). The casing used was UPVC PN12, 125 mm ID, from 0.30 m above ground to 14.2 m depth. Above ground the casing was enclosed in a steel tube (0.30m) with a lockable cap. The casing was slotted (1.2 mm) from 4.5 m to 14.2 m depth. There was no cap at the base (in rock). Filling: cement grout 0-2 m depth, drill cuttings 2-4 m depth, bentonite 4-4.5 m, gravel 4.5-12 m (rock), packer at 12m (top of rock), open hole 12-14.2 m. A water level logger was installed that logged data every 30 minutes during 2015.
  • bore
  • groundwater
  • water table depth
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • DRO
  • Cape Tribulation
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-12-08
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.451.3

Liddell; Nelson

James Cook University

Site and Soil Characterisation and Chemistry, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Core 1 ha, 2014
Liddell
James Cook University
Using the Australian Soil Classification, the soil at Cape Tribulation was classified as an: Acidic, Dystrophic, Brown Dermosol with many (20-50%) cobbles and stones throughout the profile. The soil is developed in colluvium from the metamorphic and granitic mountains to the west. The colluvium appears to have originated in a catastrophic collapse, as it consists of randomly mixed particles ranging in size from micrometres to metres.
  • soil classification
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • DRO
  • CapeTribulation
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-05-05
 
Last updated
2016-04-26
 
docid
supersite.63.8

Liddell

James Cook University

Soil Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Discovery Centre, Cow Bay, 2013
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Three types of soil monitoring probes were installed to measure water tension, volumetric water content, and average soil temperature. Columns in the pit are located at corners of a 1 x 1 m square: I - west corner, II - south corner, III - east corner. Four depths were reached: -2.0 m, -1.5 m, -0.75 m and -0.1 m.
  • soil pit
  • soil monitoring probes
  • Daintree Discovery Centre
  • DDC
  • fnqr
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2014-06-29
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.669.8

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Soil Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Discovery Centre, Cow Bay, 2014
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Three types of soil monitoring probes were installed to measure water tension, volumetric water content, and average soil temperature. Columns in the pit are located at corners of a 1 x 1 m square: I - west corner, II - south corner, III - east corner. Four depths were reached: -2.0 m, -1.5 m, -0.75 m and -0.1 m.
  • soil pit
  • soil monitoring probes
  • Daintree Discovery Centre
  • DDC
  • fnqr
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2014-06-29
 
Last updated
2016-10-12
 
docid
lloyd.667.6

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Soil Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2014
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Three types of soil monitoring probes were installed to measure water tension, volumetric water content, and average soil temperature. Columns in the pit are located at corners of a 1 x 1 m square: I - west corner, II - south corner, III - east corner. Four depths were reached: -2.0 m, -1.5 m, -0.75 m and -0.1 m.
  • soil pit
  • soil monitoring probes
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2014-06-29
 
Last updated
2016-10-12
 
docid
lloyd.665.5

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Soil Data, Water Content and Temperature, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2011
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Three types of soil monitoring probes were installed to measure water tension, volumetric water content, and average soil temperature. Columns in the pit are located at corners of a 1 x 1 m square: I - west corner, II - south corner, III - east corner. Four depths were reached: -2.0 m, -1.5 m, -0.75 m and -0.1 m.
  • soil pit
  • soil monitoring probes
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2012-12-18
 
Last updated
2017-03-24
 
docid
lloyd.304.25

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Soil Moisture Content, Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2010
McJannet
CSIRO Land and Water
A cosmic ray soil moisture sensor was installed at Robson Creek node of the FNQ Rainforest Supersite on 28 Oct 2010 by the Australian Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Monitoring Network (CosmOz; http://www.ermt.csiro.au/html/cosmoz.html). CosmOz represents just one of a growing number of networks around the World. Other networks are found in USA, Germany, and the UK with other projects adopting the technology in South America, Africa and Europe. These sensors use cosmic rays originating from outer space to measure average soil moisture over an area of about 40 hectares to a depth up to 90 cm. The system measures fast neutrons that are produced from interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and top few meters of soil. The intensity of these neutrons are moderated largely by water molecules in the soil. The number of neutrons counted over a period of time is inversely proportional to the amount of water in the soil. To estimate volumetric water content, each system is calibrated against soil samples that are collected from dry and wet moisture regimes using a standard protocol. Data is collected every 60 min and uploaded to data portal infrastructure which is maintained by the University of Arizona. This infrastructure and associated web interface were established as part of the US based Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observation System (COSMOS, http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/). Collaboration between Australian and US researchers has facilitated a data hosting agreement which has now resulted in a growing international data portal for delivering and processing data from cosmic-ray probes. The Robson Ck data can be downloaded from http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/Probes/StationDat/073/index.php
  • FNQ Rainforest Supersite
  • Robson Creek
  • Cosmic Ray
  • Soil Moisture
  • CosmOz
  • COSMOS
  • 0503
  0  
Published
2013-06-25
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.530.9

McJannet

CSIRO Land and Water

Soil Moisture Content, Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2011
McJannet
CSIRO Land and Water
A cosmic ray soil moisture sensor was installed at Robson Creek node of the FNQ Rainforest Supersite on 28 Oct 2010 by the Australian Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Monitoring Network (CosmOz; http://www.ermt.csiro.au/html/cosmoz.html). CosmOz represents just one of a growing number of networks around the World. Other networks are found in USA, Germany, and the UK with other projects adopting the technology in South America, Africa and Europe. These sensors use cosmic rays originating from outer space to measure average soil moisture over an area of about 40 hectares to a depth up to 90 cm. The system measures fast neutrons that are produced from interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and top few meters of soil. The intensity of these neutrons are moderated largely by water molecules in the soil. The number of neutrons counted over a period of time is inversely proportional to the amount of water in the soil. To estimate volumetric water content, each system is calibrated against soil samples that are collected from dry and wet moisture regimes using a standard protocol. Data is collected every 60 min and uploaded to data portal infrastructure which is maintained by the University of Arizona. This infrastructure and associated web interface were established as part of the US based Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observation System (COSMOS, http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/). Collaboration between Australian and US researchers has facilitated a data hosting agreement which has now resulted in a growing international data portal for delivering and processing data from cosmic-ray probes. The Robson Ck data can be downloaded from http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/Probes/StationDat/073/index.php
  • FNQ Rainforest Supersite
  • Robson Creek
  • Cosmic Ray
  • Soil Moisture
  • CosmOz
  • COSMOS
  • 0503
  0  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.532.3

McJannet

CSIRO Land and Water

Soil Moisture Content, Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2012
McJannet
CSIRO Land and Water
A cosmic ray soil moisture sensor was installed at Robson Creek node of the FNQ Rainforest Supersite on 28 Oct 2010 by the Australian Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Monitoring Network (CosmOz; http://www.ermt.csiro.au/html/cosmoz.html). CosmOz represents just one of a growing number of networks around the World. Other networks are found in USA, Germany, and the UK with other projects adopting the technology in South America, Africa and Europe. These sensors use cosmic rays originating from outer space to measure average soil moisture over an area of about 40 hectares to a depth up to 90 cm. The system measures fast neutrons that are produced from interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and top few meters of soil. The intensity of these neutrons are moderated largely by water molecules in the soil. The number of neutrons counted over a period of time is inversely proportional to the amount of water in the soil. To estimate volumetric water content, each system is calibrated against soil samples that are collected from dry and wet moisture regimes using a standard protocol. Data is collected every 60 min and uploaded to data portal infrastructure which is maintained by the University of Arizona. This infrastructure and associated web interface were established as part of the US based Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observation System (COSMOS, http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/). Collaboration between Australian and US researchers has facilitated a data hosting agreement which has now resulted in a growing international data portal for delivering and processing data from cosmic-ray probes. The Robson Ck data can be downloaded from http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/Probes/StationDat/073/index.php
  • FNQ Rainforest Supersite
  • Robson Creek
  • Cosmic Ray
  • Soil Moisture
  • CosmOz
  • COSMOS
  • 0503
  0  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.533.3

McJannet

CSIRO Land and Water

Soil Moisture Content, Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2013
McJannet
CSIRO Land and Water
A cosmic ray soil moisture sensor was installed at Robson Creek node of the FNQ Rainforest Supersite on 28 Oct 2010 by the Australian Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Monitoring Network (CosmOz; http://www.ermt.csiro.au/html/cosmoz.html). CosmOz represents just one of a growing number of networks around the World. Other networks are found in USA, Germany, and the UK with other projects adopting the technology in South America, Africa and Europe. These sensors use cosmic rays originating from outer space to measure average soil moisture over an area of about 40 hectares to a depth up to 90 cm. The system measures fast neutrons that are produced from interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and top few meters of soil. The intensity of these neutrons are moderated largely by water molecules in the soil. The number of neutrons counted over a period of time is inversely proportional to the amount of water in the soil. To estimate volumetric water content, each system is calibrated against soil samples that are collected from dry and wet moisture regimes using a standard protocol. Data is collected every 60 min and uploaded to data portal infrastructure which is maintained by the University of Arizona. This infrastructure and associated web interface were established as part of the US based Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observation System (COSMOS, http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/). Collaboration between Australian and US researchers has facilitated a data hosting agreement which has now resulted in a growing international data portal for delivering and processing data from cosmic-ray probes. The Robson Ck data can be downloaded from http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/Probes/StationDat/073/index.php
  • FNQ Rainforest Supersite
  • Robson Creek
  • Cosmic Ray
  • Soil Moisture
  • CosmOz
  • COSMOS
  • 0503
  0  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.534.3

McJannet

CSIRO Land and Water

Soil Moisture Content, Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2014
McJannet
CSIRO Land and Water
A cosmic ray soil moisture sensor was installed at Robson Creek node of the FNQ Rainforest Supersite on 28 Oct 2010 by the Australian Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Monitoring Network (CosmOz; http://www.ermt.csiro.au/html/cosmoz.html). CosmOz represents just one of a growing number of networks around the World. Other networks are found in USA, Germany, and the UK with other projects adopting the technology in South America, Africa and Europe. These sensors use cosmic rays originating from outer space to measure average soil moisture over an area of about 40 hectares to a depth up to 90 cm. The system measures fast neutrons that are produced from interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and top few meters of soil. The intensity of these neutrons are moderated largely by water molecules in the soil. The number of neutrons counted over a period of time is inversely proportional to the amount of water in the soil. To estimate volumetric water content, each system is calibrated against soil samples that are collected from dry and wet moisture regimes using a standard protocol. Data is collected every 60 min and uploaded to data portal infrastructure which is maintained by the University of Arizona. This infrastructure and associated web interface were established as part of the US based Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observation System (COSMOS, http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/). Collaboration between Australian and US researchers has facilitated a data hosting agreement which has now resulted in a growing international data portal for delivering and processing data from cosmic-ray probes. The Robson Ck data can be downloaded from http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/Probes/StationDat/073/index.php
  • FNQ Rainforest Supersite
  • Robson Creek
  • Cosmic Ray
  • Soil Moisture
  • CosmOz
  • COSMOS
  • 0503
  0  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.535.3

McJannet

CSIRO Land and Water

Soil Moisture Content, Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2015
McJannet
CSIRO Land and Water
A cosmic ray soil moisture sensor was installed at Robson Creek node of the FNQ Rainforest Supersite on 28 Oct 2010 by the Australian Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Monitoring Network (CosmOz; http://www.ermt.csiro.au/html/cosmoz.html). CosmOz represents just one of a growing number of networks around the World. Other networks are found in USA, Germany, and the UK with other projects adopting the technology in South America, Africa and Europe. These sensors use cosmic rays originating from outer space to measure average soil moisture over an area of about 40 hectares to a depth up to 90 cm. The system measures fast neutrons that are produced from interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and top few meters of soil. The intensity of these neutrons are moderated largely by water molecules in the soil. The number of neutrons counted over a period of time is inversely proportional to the amount of water in the soil. To estimate volumetric water content, each system is calibrated against soil samples that are collected from dry and wet moisture regimes using a standard protocol. Data is collected every 60 min and uploaded to data portal infrastructure which is maintained by the University of Arizona. This infrastructure and associated web interface were established as part of the US based Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observation System (COSMOS, http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/). Collaboration between Australian and US researchers has facilitated a data hosting agreement which has now resulted in a growing international data portal for delivering and processing data from cosmic-ray probes. The Robson Ck data can be downloaded from http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/Probes/StationDat/073/index.php
  • FNQ Rainforest Supersite
  • Robson Creek
  • Cosmic Ray
  • Soil Moisture
  • CosmOz
  • COSMOS
  • 0503
  0  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.536.3

McJannet

CSIRO Land and Water

Soil Pit Data, Soil Characterisation, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2006
Liddell
James Cook University
Using the Australian Soil Classification, the soil at the Cape Tribulation soil pit was classified out as an: Acidic, Dystrophic, Brown Dermosol with many (20-50%) cobbles and stones throughout the profile. The soil is developed in colluvium from the metamorphic and granitic mountains to the west. The colluvium appears to have originated in a catastrophic collapse, as it consists of randomly mixed particles ranging in size from micrometres to metres. In the soil pit the volumetric proportion of rock was 32% near the surface and around 44% below 0.2 m depth.
  • FNQR
  • soil pit
  • soil classification
  • soil monitoring probes
  • soil characterisation
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • DRO
  • Cape Tribulation
  • Far North Queensland
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-05-06
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.64.5

Liddell

James Cook University

Soil Pit Data, Soil Characterisation, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2012
Nelson; Liddell
Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Science (TESS) & School of Earth & Environmental Sciences; James Cook University Cairns Campus
Using the Australian Soil Classification, the soil at the Robson Creek site (pit for proposed pad) classified out as an: Acidic, Dystrophic, Brown Dermosol; medium, non-gravelly, clayey/clayey, moderate; which can be abbreviated to: Acidic, Dystrophic, Brown Dermosol or Dystrophic, Brown Dermosol or Brown Dermosol or Dermosol The Robson Creek soil is developed in alluvium (probably mixed granitic and metamorphic, although this was not assessed) and below the solum (A-B horizons) it has thick sandy or gravelly (2-10 mm sub-rounded) horizons. Soil analyses were done by the Qld Department of Natural Resources and Water Lab, Indooroopilly.
  • soil pit
  • soil classification
  • soil monitoring probes
  • soil characterisation
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2013-02-27
 
Last updated
2015-10-29
 
docid
lloyd.398.14

Nelson; Liddell

Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Science (TESS) & School of Earth & Environmental Sciences; James Cook University Cairns Campus

Soil Pit Data, Soil Characterisation, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2014
Liddell; Nelson
James Cook University Cairns Campus; Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Science (TESS) & School of Earth & Environmental Sciences
Using the Australian Soil Classification, the soil at the Robson Creek site classified out as an: Acidic, Dystrophic, Brown Dermosol; medium, non-gravelly, clayey/clayey, moderate; which can be abbreviated to: Acidic, Dystrophic, Brown Dermosol or Dystrophic, Brown Dermosol or Brown Dermosol or Dermosol The Robson Creek soil is developed in alluvium (probably mixed granitic and metamorphic, although this wasn’t assessed) and below the solum (A-B horizons) it has thick sandy or gravelly (2-10 mm sub-rounded) horizons."
  • soil classification
  • soil characterisation
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • fnqr
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2014-06-23
 
Last updated
2016-10-12
 
docid
lloyd.653.12

Liddell; Nelson

James Cook University Cairns Campus; Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Science (TESS) & School of Earth & Environmental Sciences

Soil Pit Data, Water Content and Temperature, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2012
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Three types of soil monitoring probes were installed to measure water tension, volumetric water content, and average soil temperature. Columns in the pit are located at corners of a 1 x 1 m square: I - west corner, II - south corner, III - east corner. Four depths were reached: -2.0 m, -1.5 m, -0.75 m and -0.1 m.
  • soil pit
  • soil monitoring probes
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2012-12-18
 
Last updated
2015-06-30
 
docid
lloyd.305.21

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Soil Pit Data, Water Content and Temperature, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2013
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Three types of soil monitoring probes were installed to measure water tension, volumetric water content, and average soil temperature. Columns in the pit are located at corners of a 1 x 1 m square: I - west corner, II - south corner, III - east corner. Four depths were reached: -2.0 m, -1.5 m, -0.75 m and -0.1 m.
  • 0503
  • soil pit
  • soil
  • soil monitoring probes
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  1  
Published
2013-05-24
 
Last updated
2015-10-29
 
docid
lloyd.466.13

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Soil Pit Sensor Data, Volumetric Water Content and Temperature, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2007
Liddell; Nelson
James Cook University
A soil pit was dug to 1.5 m depth in July 2007 and monitoring probes were installed at 0.1, 0.75 and 1.5 m depths in three columns. At each depth there were 3 time domain reflectometry probes (Campbell Scientific CS616) to measure volumetric water content, 3 gypsum blocks (Measurement Engineering Australia GBHeavy, except at 0.1 m depth were there were only 2) to measure water potential over the range -30 to -600 kPa. In addition one TCAV thermocouple probe to record soil temperature was located in the centre of the soil pit at 0.10m. In each column the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 20cm, each column was separated from the next by 100cm. At each depth the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 1 m.
  • soil pit
  • soil monitoring probes
  • volumetric water content
  • soil temperature
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • DRO
  • Cape Tribulation
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-12-08
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.430.8

Liddell; Nelson

James Cook University

Soil Pit Sensor Data, Volumetric Water Content and Temperature, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2008
Liddell; Nelson
James Cook University
A soil pit was dug to 1.5 m depth in July 2007 and monitoring probes were installed at 0.1, 0.75 and 1.5 m depths in three columns. At each depth there were 3 time domain reflectometry probes (Campbell Scientific CS616) to measure volumetric water content, 3 gypsum blocks (Measurement Engineering Australia GBHeavy, except at 0.1 m depth were there were only 2) to measure water potential over the range -30 to -600 kPa. In addition one TCAV thermocouple probe to record soil temperature was located in the centre of the soil pit at 0.10m. In each column the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 20cm, each column was separated from the next by 100cm. At each depth the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 1 m.
  • soil pit
  • soil monitoring probes
  • volumetric water content
  • soil temperature
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • DRO
  • Cape Tribulation
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-12-08
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.432.6

Liddell; Nelson

James Cook University

Soil Pit Sensor Data, Volumetric Water Content and Temperature, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2009
Liddell; Nelson
James Cook University
A soil pit was dug to 1.5 m depth in July 2007 and monitoring probes were installed at 0.1, 0.75 and 1.5 m depths in three columns. At each depth there were 3 time domain reflectometry probes (Campbell Scientific CS616) to measure volumetric water content, 3 gypsum blocks (Measurement Engineering Australia GBHeavy, except at 0.1 m depth were there were only 2) to measure water potential over the range -30 to -600 kPa. In addition one TCAV thermocouple probe to record soil temperature was located in the centre of the soil pit at 0.10m. In each column the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 20cm, each column was separated from the next by 100cm. At each depth the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 1 m.
  • soil pit
  • soil monitoring probes
  • volumetric water content
  • soil temperature
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • DRO
  • Cape Tribulation
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-12-08
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.434.6

Liddell; Nelson

James Cook University

Soil Pit Sensor Data, Volumetric Water Content and Temperature, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2010
Liddell; Nelson
James Cook University
A soil pit was dug to 1.5 m depth in July 2007 and monitoring probes were installed at 0.1, 0.75 and 1.5 m depths in three columns. At each depth there were 3 time domain reflectometry probes (Campbell Scientific CS616) to measure volumetric water content, 3 gypsum blocks (Measurement Engineering Australia GBHeavy, except at 0.1 m depth were there were only 2) to measure water potential over the range -30 to -600 kPa. In addition one TCAV thermocouple probe to record soil temperature was located in the centre of the soil pit at 0.10m. In each column the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 20cm, each column was separated from the next by 100cm. At each depth the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 1 m.
  • soil pit
  • soil monitoring probes
  • volumetric water content
  • soil temperature
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • DRO
  • Cape Tribulation
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-12-08
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.436.6

Liddell; Nelson

James Cook University

Soil Pit Sensor Data, Volumetric Water Content and Temperature, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2011
Liddell; Nelson
James Cook University
A soil pit was dug to 1.5 m depth in July 2007 and monitoring probes were installed at 0.1, 0.75 and 1.5 m depths in three columns. At each depth there were 3 time domain reflectometry probes (Campbell Scientific CS616) to measure volumetric water content, 3 gypsum blocks (Measurement Engineering Australia GBHeavy, except at 0.1 m depth were there were only 2) to measure water potential over the range -30 to -600 kPa. In addition one TCAV thermocouple probe to record soil temperature was located in the centre of the soil pit at 0.10m. In each column the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 20cm, each column was separated from the next by 100cm. At each depth the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 1 m.
  • soil pit
  • soil monitoring probes
  • volumetric water content
  • soil temperature
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • DRO
  • Cape Tribulation
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-12-08
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.438.6

Liddell; Nelson

James Cook University

Soil Pit Sensor Data, Volumetric Water Content and Temperature, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2012
Liddell; Nelson
James Cook University
A soil pit was dug to 1.5 m depth in July 2007 and monitoring probes were installed at 0.1, 0.75 and 1.5 m depths in three columns. At each depth there were 3 time domain reflectometry probes (Campbell Scientific CS616) to measure volumetric water content, 3 gypsum blocks (Measurement Engineering Australia GBHeavy, except at 0.1 m depth were there were only 2) to measure water potential over the range -30 to -600 kPa. In addition one TCAV thermocouple probe to record soil temperature was located in the centre of the soil pit at 0.10m. In each column the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 20cm, each column was separated from the next by 100cm. At each depth the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 1 m.
  • soil pit
  • soil monitoring probes
  • volumetric water content
  • soil temperature
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • DRO
  • Cape Tribulation
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-12-08
 
Last updated
2016-04-14
 
docid
supersite.440.7

Liddell; Nelson

James Cook University

Soil Pit Sensor Data, Volumetric Water Content and Temperature, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2013
Liddell; Nelson
James Cook University
A soil pit was dug to 1.5 m depth in July 2007 and monitoring probes were installed at 0.1, 0.75 and 1.5 m depths in three columns. At each depth there were 3 time domain reflectometry probes (Campbell Scientific CS616) to measure volumetric water content, 3 gypsum blocks (Measurement Engineering Australia GBHeavy, except at 0.1 m depth were there were only 2) to measure water potential over the range -30 to -600 kPa. In addition one TCAV thermocouple probe to record soil temperature was located in the centre of the soil pit at 0.10m. In each column the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 20cm, each column was separated from the next by 100cm. At each depth the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 1 m.
  • soil pit
  • soil monitoring probes
  • volumetric water content
  • soil temperature
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • DRO
  • Cape Tribulation
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-12-08
 
Last updated
2016-04-14
 
docid
supersite.442.8

Liddell; Nelson

James Cook University

Soil Pit Sensor Data, Volumetric Water Content and Temperature, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2014
Liddell; Nelson
James Cook University
A soil pit was dug to 1.5 m depth in July 2007 and monitoring probes were installed at 0.1, 0.75 and 1.5 m depths in three columns. At each depth there were 3 time domain reflectometry probes (Campbell Scientific CS616) to measure volumetric water content, 3 gypsum blocks (Measurement Engineering Australia GBHeavy, except at 0.1 m depth were there were only 2) to measure water potential over the range -30 to -600 kPa. In addition one TCAV thermocouple probe to record soil temperature was located in the centre of the soil pit at 0.10m. In each column the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 20cm, each column was separated from the next by 100cm. At each depth the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 1 m.
  • soil pit
  • soil monitoring probes
  • volumetric water content
  • soil temperature
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • DRO
  • Cape Tribulation
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-12-08
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.427.10

Liddell; Nelson

James Cook University

Soil Pit Sensor Data, Volumetric Water Content and Temperature, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2015
Liddell; Nelson
James Cook University
A soil pit was dug to 1.5 m depth in July 2007 and monitoring probes were installed at 0.1, 0.75 and 1.5 m depths in three columns. At each depth there were 3 time domain reflectometry probes (Campbell Scientific CS616) to measure volumetric water content, 3 gypsum blocks (Measurement Engineering Australia GBHeavy, except at 0.1 m depth were there were only 2) to measure water potential over the range -30 to -600 kPa. In addition one TCAV thermocouple probe to record soil temperature was located in the centre of the soil pit at 0.10m. In each column the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 20cm, each column was separated from the next by 100cm. At each depth the time domain reflectometry and gypsum blocks were separated laterally by 1 m.
  • soil pit
  • soil monitoring probes
  • volumetric water content
  • soil temperature
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • DRO
  • Cape Tribulation
  • FNQR
  • Far North Queensland
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-12-08
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.445.8

Liddell; Nelson

James Cook University

Soil Sampling for Calibration of Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Sensor, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2011
McJannet
CSIRO Land and Water
Soil sampling was carried out 22 February and 20 September 2011 to calibrate the Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture sensor. A cosmic ray soil moisture sensor was installed at Robson Creek node of the FNQ Rainforest Supersite on 28 Oct 2010 by the Australian Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Monitoring Network (CosmOz; http://www.ermt.csiro.au/html/cosmoz.html). CosmOz represents just one of a growing number of soil moisture monitoring networks around the World. Other networks are found in USA, Germany, and the UK with other projects adopting the technology in South America, Africa and Europe. CosmOz sensors use cosmic rays originating from outer space to measure average soil moisture over an area of about 40 hectares to a depths of between 10cm in wet soils to 70cm in dry soils. The system measures fast neutrons that are produced from interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and top few meters of soil. The intensity of these neutrons are moderated largely by water molecules in the soil. The number of neutrons counted over a period of time is inversely proportional to the amount of water in the soil. To estimate volumetric water content, each system is calibrated against soil samples that are collected from dry and wet moisture regimes using a standard protocol. The Robson Ck soil calibration data can be downloaded from http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/Probes/StationDat/073/calib.php
  • Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture
  • FNQ Rainforest Supersite
  • Robson Creek
  • Soil moisture calibration
  • bulk density
  • CosmOz
  • COSMOS
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2013-07-30
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.538.8

McJannet

CSIRO Land and Water

Stream Physico-Chemical Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2013
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
A logging water quality sonde was installed in 2013 at the Robson Creek to provide the baseline water quality in Robson Creek for the TERN Supersite node. Objectives: collection of water quality. Key aspects: logging multi-parameter sonde
  • sonde
  • water quality
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2014-06-30
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.672.3

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Stream Physico-Chemical Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 201304-201305
Bird; Liddell
James Cook University; James Cook University Cairns Campus
Objectives: To characterise the water chemistry at Robson Creek. Aspects: Long term monitoring using a logging sonde Design: Sonde mounted onto pillar of council bridge on permanent mount Methods: YSI Exo-2 Sonde
  • water quality
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  2  
Published
2013-05-27
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.474.11

Bird; Liddell

James Cook University; James Cook University Cairns Campus

Stream Physico-Chemical Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2014
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
A logging water quality sonde was installed in 2013 at the Robson Creek to provide the baseline water quality in Robson Creek for the TERN Supersite node. Objectives: collection of water quality. Key aspects: logging multi-parameter sonde
  • sonde
  • water quality
  • Robson Creek
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2014-06-30
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.673.4

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Vascular Plant Data, Direct Measure of Stems, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Discovery Centre, Cow Bay, Core 1 ha, 2012
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
All standing vegetation with a diameter at breast height >10 cm was identified and measured for height, DBH, health and growth status, individually tagged and located within the 1 hectare core vegetation plot at the Cow Bay node of the FNQ Rainforest Supersite, located at the Daintree Discovery Centre. Survey work was undertaken 7 Jun 2012.
  • Daintree Discovery Centre
  • Diameter Breast Height
  • dbh
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  2  
Published
2017-03-14
 
Last updated
2017-03-14
 
docid
supersite.845.4

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Vascular Plant Data, Direct Measure of Stems, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 1 ha Crane Plot, 2001
Liddell
James Cook University
The Cape Tribulation Crane 1 ha rainforest plot at the Daintree Rainforest Observatory is situated on the lowlands in Far North Queensland, just south of Cape Tribulation. It is associated with the TERN FNQ Rainforest SuperSite. A vascular plant census were carried out in mid 2001. All data for stems ≥ 10cm DBH can be found in the DBH stem dataset. The data is being used as baseline data set to assist in tracking changes in biomass in the rainforest.
  • forest dynamics
  • above ground biomass
  • Far North Queensland
  • Cape Tribulation
  • rainforest
  • 0705
  2  
Published
2012-01-11
 
Last updated
2016-04-14
 
docid
lloyd.17.43

Liddell

James Cook University

Vascular Plant Data, Direct Measure of Stems, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 1 ha Crane Plot, 2010
Liddell
James Cook University
The Cape Tribulation Crane 1 ha rainforest plot at the Daintree Rainforest Observatory is situated on the lowlands in Far North Queensland, just south of Cape Tribulation. It is associated with the TERN FNQ Rainforest SuperSite. A vascular plant census were carried out in mid 2010. All data for stems ≥ 10cm DBH can be found in the DBH stem dataset. The data is being used as baseline data set to assist in tracking changes in biomass in the rainforest.
  • forest dynamics
  • above ground biomass
  • Far North Queensland
  • Cape Tribulation
  • rainforest
  • 0705
  2  
Published
2012-03-07
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
lloyd.115.39

Liddell

James Cook University

Vascular Plant Data, Direct Measure of Stems, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 25 ha Plot, 2009-2015
Bradford
CSIRO
The Robson Creek 25 ha rainforest plot is situated on the Atherton Tablelands in Far North Queensland. It is part of the TERN FNQ rainforest supersite. This dataset is for stems ≥10cm diameter at breast height only for the entire 25 ha. Data is: Species name, DBH, POM, height, and geographic coordinates. Vegetation data for the supersite single core hectare 6 is located in the database – Vascular Plant Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest Supersite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha.
  • growth rate
  • forest dynamics
  • mortality
  • recruitment
  • biomass
  • Far North Queensland
  • supersite
  • Robson Creek
  • rainforest
  • FNQ
  • 0705
  2  
Published
2011-10-20
 
Last updated
2017-03-21
 
docid
bradford.5.25

Bradford

CSIRO

Vascular Plant Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 1 ha Crane Plot, 2005
Liddell
James Cook University
The Cape Tribulation Crane 1 ha rainforest plot at the Daintree Rainforest Observatory is situated on the lowlands in Far North Queensland, just south of Cape Tribulation. It is associated with the TERN FNQ Rainforest SuperSite. A vascular plant census were carried out in mid 2005. All data for stems ≥ 10cm DBH can be found in the DBH stem dataset. The data is being used as baseline data set to assist in tracking changes in biomass in the rainforest.
  • forest dynamics
  • above ground biomass
  • Far North Queensland
  • Cape Tribulation
  • rainforest
  • 0705
  2  
Published
2012-01-09
 
Last updated
2016-10-24
 
docid
lloyd.5.45

Liddell

James Cook University

Vascular Plant Species Inventory, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, Core 1 ha, 2012
Bradford
CSIRO
The Robson Creek 25 ha rainforest plot is situated on the Atherton Tablelands in Far North Queensland. It is part of the TERN FNQ Rainforest SuperSite. The following data is collected from the core hectare 6 within the 25 ha plot. LAI and photopoints are done at the end of each wet and dry season. The vascular plant survey and six gentry transects were done in 2012. Coarse woody debris is done each year.
  • 0705
  • forest dynamics
  • species inventory
  • biomass
  • Far North Queensland
  • Robson Creek
  • rainforest
  • FNQR
  1  
Published
2015-12-14
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.499.3

Bradford

CSIRO

Vegetation Decomposition, Tea Bag Index, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2017
Liddell
James Cook University
Plant material decomposition in soil was investigated using two types of tea bags (Green and Rooibos) buried to 8 cm for 80-90 days. Weight loss was determined and contextual data collected. This experiment aligns with, and contributed to a citizen science program (www.teatime4science.org) looking at decomposition rates around the world.
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Cape Tribulation
  • Rainforest
  • Tea Bag Index
  • Plant decomposition
  • 0501
  2  
Published
2017-09-21
 
Last updated
2017-09-21
 
docid
supersite.877.2

Liddell

James Cook University

Vegetation Decomposition, Tea Bag Index, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2017
Karan
James Cook University
Plant material decomposition in soil was investigated using two types of tea bags (Green and Rooibos) buried to 8 cm for 80-90 days. Weight loss was determined and contextual data collected. This experiment aligns with, and contributed to a citizen science program (www.teatime4science.org) looking at decomposition rates around the world.
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite
  • Robson Creek
  • Rainforest
  • Tea Bag Index
  • Plant decomposition
  • 0501
  2  
Published
2017-09-21
 
Last updated
2017-09-21
 
docid
supersite.879.2

Karan

James Cook University

Vegetation Direct Measure of Stems and Above Ground Biomass, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation Core 1 ha, 2014
Laurance; Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Following protocols outlined in TERN NCRIS 2013 Annexure 1, the ID, height and diameter at breast height of all standing stems (>10cm) was measured. Above ground biomass was then determined using allometric equations from Chave et al. 2005. Total AGBM for the site was estimated to be 215.68t/ha-1. The data file was replaced 31 March 2016 to correct the Y coordinates for trees in subplot 10
  • biomass
  • above ground biomass
  • Daintree
  • AGB
  • FNQR
  • Cape Tribulation
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-08-31
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.236.12

Laurance; Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, CTBCC, 2015
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as monitoring transects at Lamb Uplands (including Robson Creek node) and James Cook University Daintree Rainforest Observatory (Cape Tribulation node), for which data was collected using standarised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect at the James Cook University Daintree Rainforest Observatory (Cape Tribulation node) is represented by 3 points along a 400m site for which birds are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at ~50m asl at the James Cook University Daintree Rainforest Observatory (TERN FNQ Supersite, Cape Tribulation node) at which biannual avifauna surveys will be conducted by The College of Marine and Environmental Sciences (CMES) at James Cook University (JCU) has a Memorandum of Understanding between TERN FNQ Rainforest SuperSite.
  • FNQR
  • Cape Tribulation
  • Daintree
  • rainforest
  • biodiversity
  • fauna
  • monitoring
  • CTBCC
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2015-05-21
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.115.6

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, 2012
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standardised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 6 points along a 1 km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 700 m, 900 m and 1100 m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands.
  • CTBCC
  • Climate Change
  • Wet Tropics
  • Biodiversity
  • NERP
  • Mt Edith
  • Lamb Range
  • FNQ
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • Birds
  • Wildlife
  • Amphibian
  • Mammal
  • Reptile
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2013-05-23
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
lloyd.453.20

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, 2013
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standardised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 6 points along a 1 km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 700 m, 900 m and 1100 m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands.
  • CTBCC
  • Climate Change
  • Wet Tropics
  • Biodiversity
  • NERP
  • Mt Edith
  • Lamb Range
  • FNQ
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • Birds
  • Wildlife
  • Amphibian
  • Mammal
  • Reptile
  • Williams
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2013-11-28
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
lloyd.559.12

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, 2015
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as monitoring transects at Lamb Uplands (including Robson Creek node), for which data was collected using standarised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect at Lamb Uplands (including Robson Creek node) is represented by 6 points along a 1km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 700, 900 and 1100m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands with 4x 1km transects located at: LU7A (Robson ck) LU7B (Robson ck) LU9A LU11A
  • FNQR
  • Robson Creek
  • rainforest
  • biodiversity
  • fauna
  • monitoring
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  2  
Published
2015-05-21
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.74.8

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, LU11A, 2009
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standardised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 6 points along a 1 km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 1100 m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands.
  • CTBCC
  • Climate Change
  • Wet Tropics
  • Biodiversity
  • NERP
  • Mt Edith
  • Lamb Range
  • Williams
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  2  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2015-12-15
 
docid
supersite.537.2

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, LU11A, 2010
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standardised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 6 points along a 1 km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 1100 m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands.
  • CTBCC
  • Climate Change
  • Wet Tropics
  • Biodiversity
  • NERP
  • Mt Edith
  • Lamb Range
  • Williams
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  2  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2015-12-15
 
docid
supersite.540.2

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, LU11A, 2011
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standardised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 6 points along a 1 km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 1100 m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands.
  • CTBCC
  • Climate Change
  • Wet Tropics
  • Biodiversity
  • NERP
  • Mt Edith
  • Lamb Range
  • Williams
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  2  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2015-12-15
 
docid
supersite.543.2

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, LU11A, 2014
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standardised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 6 points along a 1km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 1100m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands.
  • CTBCC
  • Climate Change
  • Wet Tropics
  • Biodiversity
  • NERP
  • Mt Edith
  • Lamb Range
  • Williams
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2014-12-09
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.18.4

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, LU7A, 2009
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standardised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 6 points along a 1 km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 700 m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands.
  • CTBCC
  • Climate Change
  • Wet Tropics
  • Biodiversity
  • NERP
  • Mt Edith
  • Lamb Range
  • Williams
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  2  
Published
2015-12-10
 
Last updated
2015-12-10
 
docid
supersite.471.3

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, LU7A, 2010
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standardised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 6 points along a 1 km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 700 m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands.
  • Climate Change
  • CTBCC
  • Wet Tropics
  • Biodiversity
  • NERP
  • Mt Edith
  • Lamb Range
  • Williams
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  2  
Published
2015-12-10
 
Last updated
2015-12-10
 
docid
supersite.475.2

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, LU7A, 2011
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standardised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 6 points along a 1 km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 700 m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands.
  • Lamb Range
  • Williams
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  • Mt Edith
  • CTBCC
  • Climate Change
  • Wet Tropics
  • Biodiversity
  • NERP
  2  
Published
2015-12-10
 
Last updated
2015-12-10
 
docid
supersite.478.2

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, LU7A, 2014
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standarised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 6 points along a 1km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 700m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands.
  • CTBCC
  • Climate Change
  • Wet Tropics
  • Biodiversity
  • NERP
  • Mt Edith
  • Lamb Range
  • Williams
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2014-12-04
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.15.3

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, LU7B, 2014
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standardised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 6 points along a 1km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 700m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands.
  • CTBCC
  • Climate Change
  • Wet Tropics
  • Biodiversity
  • NERP
  • Mt Edith
  • Lamb Range
  • Williams
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2014-12-09
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.16.6

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, LU9A, 2009
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standardised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 6 points along a 1 km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 900 m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands.
  • CTBCC
  • Climate Change
  • Wet Tropics
  • Biodiversity
  • NERP
  • Mt Edith
  • Lamb Range
  • Williams
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  2  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2015-12-15
 
docid
supersite.551.2

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, LU9A, 2010
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standardised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 6 points along a 1 km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 900 m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands.
  • CTBCC
  • Climate Change
  • Wet Tropics
  • Biodiversity
  • NERP
  • Mt Edith
  • Lamb Range
  • Williams
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  2  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2015-12-15
 
docid
supersite.554.2

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, LU9A, 2011
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standardised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 6 points along a 1 km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 900 m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands.
  • CTBCC
  • Climate Change
  • Wet Tropics
  • Biodiversity
  • NERP
  • Mt Edith
  • Lamb Range
  • Williams
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  2  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2015-12-15
 
docid
supersite.557.2

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Vertebrate Fauna Biodiversity Monitoring, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, CTBCC, LU9A, 2014
Williams
Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University
Monitoring of distributional and abundance data for Australian tropical rainforest vertebrates is required to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity and assess the impacts of global climate change. The data set here serves as a single monitoring transect for which data was collected using standardised survey techniques to assess distribution and abundance of vertebrates. It is part of a larger monitoring project that bisects latitudinal and elevational gradients across 5 mountain ranges in the Wet Tropics region. A monitory transect is represented by 6 points along a 1km site for which amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals are surveyed. The dataset here represents the monitoring at 900m asl on Mt Edith in the Lamb Range Uplands.
  • CTBCC
  • Climate Change
  • Wet Tropics
  • Biodiversity
  • NERP
  • Mt Edith
  • Lamb Range
  • Williams
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Far North Queensland
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2014-12-09
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
supersite.17.4

Williams

Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, James Cook University

Water Chemistry Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 201310-201311
Liddell; Bird
James Cook University Cairns Campus
Measured water quality variables are reported for surface water from a permanent sampling site on Robson Creek, Far North Queensland. The variables include major cations and anions, trace heavy metals, solids (suspended and total) inorganic and organic nitrogen (speciated) and phosphorus. This data is sampled to monitor the baseline water quality of an upper catchment stream in the Wet Tropics World Heritage Rainforests – in this case an highland location in the Lamb Range, Atherton Tablelands. Data will be used to evaluate changes in water quality as a result of climate change and other disturbance factors in this relatively pristine environment. Monthly sampling over the first year with analyses carried out by a commercial laboratory.
  • surface water
  • tropical
  • rainforest
  • alkalinity
  • major ions
  • water chemistry
  • nutrients
  • nitrogen
  • phosphorus
  • suspended solids
  • hardness
  • dissolved organic carbon
  • 0602
  3  
Published
2014-01-04
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.569.10

Liddell; Bird

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree, Cape Tribulation, 2014
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2005 at the Cape Tribulation Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTER) site to provide the baseline climate data for the Terrestrial Ecosystem Network (TERN) SuperSite node Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weather station
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • Australian Canopy Crane
  • Australian Canopy Crane Research Facility
  • Cape Tribulation
  • Climate
  • Weather
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • FNQR
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2014-06-29
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
lloyd.662.11

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Discovery Centre, Cow Bay, 2008
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2008 at the Daintree Discovery Centre site to provide the baseline climate data for the research activities at this location (tower, vegetation plot). Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weatherstation
  • Daintree Discovery Centre
  • weather
  • climate
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-10-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.172.23

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Discovery Centre, Cow Bay, 2009
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2008 at the Daintree Discovery Centre site to provide the baseline climate data for the research activities at this location (tower, vegetation plot). Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weatherstation
  • Daintree Discovery Centre
  • weather
  • climate
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-10-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.176.23

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Discovery Centre, Cow Bay, 2010
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2008 at the Daintree Discovery Centre site to provide the baseline climate data for the research activities at this location (tower, vegetation plot). Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • automatic weatherstation
  • Daintree Discovery Centre
  • weather
  • climate
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-10-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.177.23

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Discovery Centre, Cow Bay, 2011
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2008 at the Daintree Discovery Centre site to provide the baseline climate data for the research activities at this location (tower, vegetation plot). Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weatherstation
  • Daintree Discovery Centre
  • weather
  • climate
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-10-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.178.22

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Discovery Centre, Cow Bay, 2012
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2008 at the Daintree Discovery Centre site to provide the baseline climate data for the research activities at this location (tower, vegetation plot). Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weatherstation
  • Daintree Discovery Centre
  • weather
  • climate
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-10-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.179.26

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Discovery Centre, Cow Bay, 2013
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2008 at the Daintree Discovery Centre site to provide the baseline climate data for the research activities at this location (tower, vegetation plot). Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weatherstation
  • Daintree Discovery Centre
  • weather
  • climate
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2013-04-12
 
Last updated
2016-04-13
 
docid
lloyd.415.29

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Discovery Centre, Cow Bay, 2014
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2008 at the Daintree Discovery Centre site to provide the baseline climate data for the research activities at this location (tower, vegetation plot). Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weatherstation
  • Daintree Discovery Centre
  • weather
  • climate
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • FNQR
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2014-06-29
 
Last updated
2016-10-12
 
docid
lloyd.660.5

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2006
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2005 at the Cape Tribulation Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTER) site to provide the baseline climate data for the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) SuperSite node. Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • Cape Tribulation
  • automatic weather station
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • Australian Canopy Crane
  • Australian Canopy Crane Research Facility
  • Climate
  • Weather
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-04-10
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.144.38

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2007
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2005 at the Cape Tribulation Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTER) site to provide the baseline climate data for the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) SuperSite node. Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weather station
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • Australian Canopy Crane
  • Australian Canopy Crane Research Facility
  • climate
  • weather
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • Cape Tribulation
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-04-10
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.142.35

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2008
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2005 at the Cape Tribulation Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTER) site to provide the baseline climate data for the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) SuperSite node. Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weather station
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • Australian Canopy Crane
  • Australian Canopy Crane Research Facility
  • Cape Tribulation
  • Weather
  • Climate
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-04-10
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.140.30

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2009
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2005 at the Cape Tribulation Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTER) site to provide the baseline climate data for the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) SuperSite node. Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weather station
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • Australian Canopy Crane
  • Australian Canopy Crane Research Facility
  • Cape Tribulation
  • Climate
  • Weather
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-04-10
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.138.32

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2010
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2005 at the Cape Tribulation Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTER) site to provide the baseline climate data for the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) SuperSite node. Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weather station
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • Australian Canopy Crane
  • Australian Canopy Crane Research Facility
  • Cape Tribulation
  • weather
  • climate
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-01-16
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.28.41

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2011
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2005 at the Cape Tribulation Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTER) site to provide the baseline climate data for the Terrestrial Ecosystem Network (TERN) SuperSite node Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weather station
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • Australian Canopy Crane
  • Australian Canopy Crane Research Facility
  • Cape Tribulation
  • Climate
  • Weather
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-04-10
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.136.36

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2012
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2005 at the Cape Tribulation Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTER) site to provide the baseline climate data for the Terrestrial Ecosystem Network (TERN) SuperSite node Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weather station
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • Australian Canopy Crane
  • Australian Canopy Crane Research Facility
  • Cape Tribulation
  • Climate
  • Weather
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-10-10
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.238.29

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, 2013
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2005 at the Cape Tribulation Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTER) site to provide the baseline climate data for the Terrestrial Ecosystem Network (TERN) SuperSite node Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weather station
  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • Australian Canopy Crane
  • Australian Canopy Crane Research Facility
  • Cape Tribulation
  • Climate
  • Weather
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2013-04-12
 
Last updated
2016-04-18
 
docid
lloyd.416.30

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2010
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2010 at the Robson Creek site to provide the baseline climate data for the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) SuperSite node. Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • climate
  • automatic weatherstation
  • Robson Creek
  • weather
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-10-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.173.21

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2011
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2010 at the Robson Creek site to provide the baseline climate data for the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) SuperSite node. Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • automatic weatherstation
  • Robson Creek
  • weather
  • climate
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2014-01-07
 
Last updated
2016-10-12
 
docid
lloyd.585.13

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2012
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2010 at the Robson Creek site to provide the baseline climate data for the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) SuperSite node. Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weatherstation
  • Robson Creek
  • weather
  • climate
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-10-24
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.255.22

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2013
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2010 at the Robson Creek site to provide the baseline climate data for the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) SuperSite node. Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weatherstation
  • Robson Creek
  • weather
  • climate
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2013-04-16
 
Last updated
2015-10-29
 
docid
lloyd.414.17

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus

Weather Station Data, Far North Queensland Rainforest SuperSite, Robson Creek, 2014
Liddell
James Cook University Cairns Campus
An automatic weatherstation was installed in 2010 at the Robson Creek site to provide the baseline climate data for the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) SuperSite node. Objectives: collection of baseline weather data. Key aspects: automatic weatherstation
  • automatic weatherstation
  • Robson Creek
  • weather
  • climate
  • FNQ Rainforest
  • FNQR
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2014-06-29
 
Last updated
2016-10-12
 
docid
lloyd.658.5

Liddell

James Cook University Cairns Campus