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40 data packages found.

Title and Description Creator (People and Organisation)
Acoustic Sensor, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, 2012
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite
  1  
Published
2015-11-16
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.314.5

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Acoustic Sensor, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, 2013
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite
  1  
Published
2015-11-16
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.315.5

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Acoustic Sensor, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, 2014
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite
  1  
Published
2015-11-16
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.316.6

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Acoustic Sensor, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, 2015
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite
  1  
Published
2016-11-13
 
Last updated
2016-11-13
 
docid
supersite.729.2

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Acoustic Sensor, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, 2016
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite
  1  
Published
2016-11-13
 
Last updated
2016-11-13
 
docid
supersite.730.2

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Ant Survey, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected in Dec 2014 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite
  • core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.840.1

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Ant Survey, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected in May 2015 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite
  • core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.841.2

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

BASE Contextual, Soil Physico-Chemical Data, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2013
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
Soil collection and analysis of chemical and physical attributes was carried out to provide contextual data for the Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) soil microbial diversity project (http://www.bioplatforms.com/soil-biodiversity/). Nine discrete soil samples from a 25 m x 25 m quadrat, sampled at two depth ranges (0 – 10cm and 20 – 30cm). Eight samples were taken at the corners and mid-points of the 25 m x 25m sides of the quadrat, with sample taken at the centre. The nine subsamples were combined for each depth, to return a single surface and deeper soil sample per quadrat. Samples for chemical and physical analysis were air-dried and transported to CSBP laboratories, Perth, Australia.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0503
  • soil
  • physico-chemical
  • chemistry
  • Warra
  • Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite
  1  
Published
2015-12-07
 
Last updated
2016-11-13
 
docid
supersite.415.3

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Beetle Survey, Warra, Southern Forests Experimental Forest Landscape, 2010-2011
Wardlaw
University of Tasmania
The dataset was collected as part of a broader study examining the responses of bird, plant and beetle species to the intensity of disturbance in the landscape surrounding plots of either mature tall, wet eucalypt forest or of 25-50 year-old silvicultural regeneration following clearfell harvesting. The study tested the null hypotheses that species persisting in patches of mature forest or recolonising patches of silvicultural regeneration would be insensitive to the intensity of disturbance in the surrounding landscape The study was done in 2010-11 in the Southern Forests Experimental Forest Landscape (SFEFL) – a 32 x 35 area anchored on the Warra Long-Term Ecological Research site and extending eastwards to the estuary of the Huon River. The surveys of the three taxonomic groups were done in fifty-six, 50x50m plots – 28 each in mature eucalypt forest and silvicultural regeneration. Those plots were located to sample the measured range of average disturbance intensity (based on the mix of vegetation classes) at three scales - 0.5, 1 and 2 km – in the circular landscapes surrounding the plots. The beetle dataset was based on window intercept trap sampling to collect beetles at each 50 x 50 m plot-corner done on over a six-week period in March - April 2010.
  • Warra
  • Southern Forests Experimental Forest Landscape
  • beetles
  • forest management
  • disturbance
  • landscape ecology
  • mature forest
  • Eucalyptus obliqua
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • 0705
  • 0502
  1  
Published
2017-10-03
 
Last updated
2017-10-03
 
docid
supersite.886.2

Wardlaw

University of Tasmania

Bird Survey Data, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Silvicultural Systems Trial External Control, 2011
Hingston; Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
The dataset contains records of bird species encountered during point-count surveys done in spring-summer 2011 along “Bird Track” within the Warra Long-Term Ecological Research site (www.warra.com). The 2011 Bird Track is the eighth of annual surveys done along the Bird Track route. The Bird Track survey route is situated in Eucalyptus obliqua primary (unlogged) forest. It serves as the External Control for the Warra Silvicultural Systems Trial which compares clearfell harvesting with its alternatives in tall, wet Eucalyptus obliqua forest using a before-after-control-impact (BACI) design. Lefort and Grove (2009) document the results for birds in that study for the first three years after harvesting. Reference Lefort, P & Grove, S 2009, Early responses of birds to clearfelling and its alternatives in lowland wet eucalypt forest in Tasmania, Australia', Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 258, pp. 460–471.
  • Warra
  • Silvicultural Systems Trial
  • fauna
  • birds
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2016-04-03
 
Last updated
2016-04-03
 
docid
supersite.607.2

Hingston; Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Bird Survey Data, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Silvicultural Systems Trial External Control, 2012
Wardlaw; Hingston
Forestry Tasmania
The dataset contains records of bird species encountered during point-count surveys done in spring-summer 2012 along “Bird Track” within the Warra Long-Term Ecological Research site (www.warra.com). The 2012 Bird Track is the ninth of annual surveys done along the Bird Track route. The Bird Track survey route is situated in Eucalyptus obliqua primary (unlogged) forest. It serves as the External Control for the Warra Silvicultural Systems Trial which compares clearfell harvesting with its alternatives in tall, wet Eucalyptus obliqua forest using a before-after-control-impact (BACI) design. Lefort and Grove (2009) document the results for birds in that study for the first three years after harvesting. Reference Lefort, P & Grove, S 2009, Early responses of birds to clearfelling and its alternatives in lowland wet eucalypt forest in Tasmania, Australia', Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 258, pp. 460–471.
  • Warra
  • Silvicultural Systems Trial
  • fauna
  • birds
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2016-04-03
 
Last updated
2016-04-03
 
docid
supersite.609.3

Wardlaw; Hingston

Forestry Tasmania

Bird Survey Data, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Silvicultural Systems Trial External Control, 2013
Wardlaw; Hingston
Forestry Tasmania
The dataset contains records of bird species encountered during point-count surveys done in spring-summer 2013 along “Bird Track” within the Warra Long-Term Ecological Research site (www.warra.com). The 2013 Bird Track is the ninth of annual surveys done along the Bird Track route. The Bird Track survey route is situated in Eucalyptus obliqua primary (unlogged) forest. It serves as the External Control for the Warra Silvicultural Systems Trial which compares clearfell harvesting with its alternatives in tall, wet Eucalyptus obliqua forest using a before-after-control-impact (BACI) design. Lefort and Grove (2009) document the results for birds in that study for the first three years after harvesting. Reference Lefort, P & Grove, S 2009, Early responses of birds to clearfelling and its alternatives in lowland wet eucalypt forest in Tasmania, Australia', Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 258, pp. 460–471.
  • Warra
  • Silvicultural Systems Trial
  • fauna
  • birds
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2016-04-03
 
Last updated
2016-04-03
 
docid
supersite.612.3

Wardlaw; Hingston

Forestry Tasmania

Bird Survey Data, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Silvicultural Systems Trial External Control, 2014
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
The dataset contains records of bird species encountered during point-count surveys done in spring-summer 2014 along “Bird Track” within the Warra Long-Term Ecological Research site (www.warra.com). The 2014 Bird Track survey adds to bird surveys done annually along that survey route since 2004. The Bird Track survey route is situated in Eucalyptus obliqua primary (unlogged) forest. It serves as the External Control for the Warra Silvicultural Systems Trial which compares clearfell harvesting with its alternatives in tall, wet Eucalyptus obliqua forest using a before-after-control-impact (BACI) design. Lefort and Grove (2009) document the results for birds in that study for the first three years after harvesting. Reference Lefort, P & Grove, S 2009, Early responses of birds to clearfelling and its alternatives in lowland wet eucalypt forest in Tasmania, Australia', Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 258, pp. 460–471.
  • fauna
  • Warra
  • Silvicultural Systems Trial
  • birds
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2015-05-14
 
Last updated
2016-04-03
 
docid
supersite.66.6

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Bird Survey Data, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Silvicultural Systems Trial External Control, 2015
Wardlaw; Hingston
Forestry Tasmania
The dataset contains records of bird species encountered during point-count surveys done in spring-summer 2015 along “Bird Track” within the Warra Long-Term Ecological Research site (www.warra.com). The 2015 Bird Track is the ninth of annual surveys done along the Bird Track route. The Bird Track survey route is situated in Eucalyptus obliqua primary (unlogged) forest. It serves as the External Control for the Warra Silvicultural Systems Trial which compares clearfell harvesting with its alternatives in tall, wet Eucalyptus obliqua forest using a before-after-control-impact (BACI) design. Lefort and Grove (2009) document the results for birds in that study for the first three years after harvesting. Reference Lefort, P & Grove, S 2009, Early responses of birds to clearfelling and its alternatives in lowland wet eucalypt forest in Tasmania, Australia', Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 258, pp. 460–471.
  • Warra
  • Silvicultural Systems Trial
  • fauna
  • birds
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2016-04-03
 
Last updated
2016-04-03
 
docid
supersite.614.2

Wardlaw; Hingston

Forestry Tasmania

Bird Survey Data, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Silvicultural Systems Trial External Control Track, 1998-2010
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
Five-minute counts of birds (seen or hear) observed during >5 separate visits made each year to each of 20 points located at 50-metre intervals along “Bird Track”. The dataset contains records made initially in 1998 and then annual visits made during the period 2004– 2010. Bird Track sample points serves as an external control for the Silvicultural Systems Trial situated 2 km to the east (see map). The track is situated in primary E. obliqua forest comprising a mix of mature and regrowth trees originating from non-stand-replacing wildfires in 1898 / 1934. The understory is a mosaic of rainforest and wet sclerophyll forest species. A full description of the survey method is given in Lefort and Grove (2009) .
  • 0602
  • birds
  • bird survey
  • Warra
  3  
Published
2013-06-03
 
Last updated
2016-04-03
 
docid
lloyd.502.11

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Coarse Woody Debris Greater Than 40 cm Diameter, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
The dataset comprises measurements carried out in 2015 of all pieces of coarse woody debris greater than 40 cm diameter at the small end within the Core 1 ha plot at the Warra Supersite. The measurements include: taxon of parent tree; dimensions (large and small end diameters, length); decay stage; location of log within the 1 ha plot; calculations of log volume, total biomass and mass of carbon.
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • 0705
  • Warra
  • forest
  • vegetation
  • biomass
  • carbon
  1  
Published
2016-04-03
 
Last updated
2016-04-07
 
docid
supersite.616.4

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Coarse Woody Debris Less Than 40 cm Diameter, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
The dataset comprises a line-intersect survey carried out in 2015 of coarse woody debris less than 40 cm diameter (at the point of intersection with transect) within the Core 1 ha plot at the Warra Supersite. The measurements include: taxon of parent tree; distance along transect where the transect intersects with the CWD piece, diameter; decay stage; type of piece; calculations of log volume.
  • Warra
  • forest
  • vegetation
  • biomass
  • carbon
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2016-04-03
 
Last updated
2016-04-07
 
docid
supersite.620.4

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Eucalyptus obliqua biomass determination, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, 2003
Ximenes
NSW DPI
Destructive sampling of 47 Eucalyptus obliqua trees was carried out to determine a range of biomass measures that can be used to inform allometric equations. Method Step Description The same sequence of activities was followed for each tree harvested in this study: a) Selection of trees: the trees were selected by personnel from State Forests of NSW and Forestry Tasmania to reflect as closely as possible the range and quality of trees that are harvested during a commercial harvesting operation in that area. b) Measurement of tree DBH. c) Felling of the tree using a chainsaw. d) Measurement of the length of the tree and stump height. e) Transport of the logs and crown from the forest to the log dump by an excavator. f) Weight of the crown: the crown was lifted by the excavator and placed on a platform placed on top of the weight bars to allow measurement of material shorter than the span between the weigh bars. g) Weight of full-length log (still with the bark on): the logs were placed on top of hardwood beams placed on the weigh bars to optimise load sharing. Some logs exceeded the capacity of the weigh bars; in those cases, they were either split or shortened and each component measured separately. h) Debarking of the log (by the excavator). i) Weight of the main log (debarked), as in “g”. j) Sampling of the log: disks were cut at both ends of the log for laboratory analyses, after the outermost sections were discarded. The disks were put in sealed plastic bags. k) Grading and cutting of the log into log products. The log product categories used were: sawlog, veneer logs and pulp. l) Measurement of length and diameters at both ends of each log product. m) Weight of each log product as in “g”. n) Sampling of crown: random samples were cut with the chainsaw and placed in sealed plastic bags. A visual assessment was undertaken to estimate any losses (crown material and bark) that may have occurred during to transport of each crown and log from the forest to the log dump.
  • Warra
  • Eucalyptus obliqua
  • biomass
  • Mesmate stringybark
  • 0705
  2  
Published
2014-04-07
 
Last updated
2016-10-26
 
docid
lloyd.628.9

Ximenes

NSW DPI

Five-minute Point-Count Bird Survey, Warra, Southern Forests Experimental Forest Landscape, 2010-2011
Wardlaw
University of Tasmania
The dataset was collected as part of a broader study examining the responses of bird, plant and beetle species to the intensity of disturbance in the landscape surrounding plots of either mature tall, wet eucalypt forest or of 25-50 year-old silvicultural regeneration following clearfell harvesting. The study tested the null hypotheses that species persisting in patches of mature forest or recolonising patches of silvicultural regeneration would be insensitive to the intensity of disturbance in the surrounding landscape The study was done in 2010-11 in the Southern Forests Experimental Forest Landscape (SFEFL) – a 32 x 35 area anchored on the Warra Long-Term Ecological Research site and extending eastwards to the estuary of the Huon River. The surveys of the three taxonomic groups were done in fifty-six, 50x50m plots – 28 each in mature eucalypt forest and silvicultural regeneration. Those plots were located to sample the measured range of average disturbance intensity (based on the mix of vegetation classes) at three scales - 0.5, 1 and 2 km – in the circular landscapes surrounding the plots. The bird dataset was based on 5-minute point-count surveys of each 50 x 50 m plot-corner done on sixteen separated visits between February 2010 and March 2011.
  • Warra
  • Southern Forests Experimental Forest Landscape
  • birds
  • forest management
  • disturbance
  • landscape ecology
  • mature forest
  • Eucalyptus obliqua
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0705
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2017-10-03
 
Last updated
2017-10-03
 
docid
supersite.883.1

Wardlaw

University of Tasmania

Gentry Survey of Vegetation Cover, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
The dataset comprises measurements of cover and abundance of lower-stratum vegetation in the Core 1-ha plot at the Warra Supersite. The measurements were made using the Gentry Transects sampling method and are part of the standard set of vegetation measurements documented in the Supersites Vegetation Monitoring Protocols (Australian Supersites Network, 2015). The data came from a measurement campaign done in March 2014. Reference: Australian Supersites Network (2015) Supersite Vegetation Monitoring Protocols. Version 1.1.6. The Australian Supersites Network, Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network, Australia.
  • Warra
  • Warra Tall Eucalypt
  • vegetation
  • forest composition
  • vegetation structure
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • 0705
  3  
Published
2015-06-02
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.146.6

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Hydrology of Small Catchments at Warra and Hydrological Effects of Forest Operations, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, 1998-2009
Roberts
Forestry Tasmania
A major hydrology and water quality program has been established at the Warra Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site. Weirs have been constructed on three streams, Warra Creek, Swanson Creek and King Creek, with a further 13 streams within the Warra Site sampled fortnightly. The three objectives of the study are to: characterise the variability of water quality in a pristine stream, determine the impact of logging on stream hydrology and obtain an overview of the water quality within the Warra LTER area. Warra Creek, with a catchment of 442 ha, is to be retained as a pristine (control) catchment. Both Swanson Creek (84 ha) and King Creek (48 ha) catchments have been partially logged and further logging is planned. Initial data on water quality and quantity have now been analysed. The three steams with weirs carry water that is coloured with organic matter. Although base flow turbidity for Warra Creek is low (<1 ntu), average turbidity is high at 11.5 ntu. Storm events in the area are generally associated with cold changes, resulting in drops in stream water temperature. Storm profiles are characterised by a rapid increase in stream flow followed by a gradual return to base levels. Turbidity is highest during initial storm flow, with a seasonal difference occurring in flow and turbidity. Streams in the Warra LTER site vary in their catchment geology and water chemistry. Work is under way to characterise the water colour and to determine the chemistry of the water. For full details see http://www.warra.com/index.php/2012-05-15-18-01-11/2012-05-15-18-09-47/item/49-hydrology-of-pristine-catchments-in-warra
  • Warra
  • hydrology
  • water quality
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2012-10-31
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.262.9

Roberts

Forestry Tasmania

Leaf Area Index Data, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, 2015
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange (Bréda, 2003). Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns (Walker et al. 1981). These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and as a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as DCP (digital cover photography) and DHP (digital hemispheric photography). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP) is recommended for short vegetation (4-8 m) e.g. low banksia woodland, complex (multi strata) and tall vegetation (> 40+ m) using images taken 20 m apart (MacFarlane et al. 2007). DHP was used to calculate the LAI at the Core 1 ha at the Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite.
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • 0705
  • Warra
  • Leaf Area Index
  • vegetation
  • LAI
  1  
Published
2016-05-15
 
Last updated
2016-11-13
 
docid
supersite.685.5

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Long-Term Monitoring of Beetle Succession in Decaying Eucalyptus obliqua Logs, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, 1999-2014
Grove
Forestry Tasmania
Concern over the conservation implications of declining availability of large logs in Tasmania's wet eucalypt production forests managed on relatively short rotations led to the establishment of a long-term experiment aimed at comparing succession in saproxylic beetles in large-diameter (mature) and small-diameter (regrowth) logs. The first sampling cycle spanned the first five years following the felling of six mature-aged (>150 years) and six mature regrowth-aged (c75 years) Eucalyptus obliqua trees growing in a multi-aged forest study area at Warra in southern Tasmania. These were felled over three seasons from May (autumn) 1999 to February (summer) 2000. For full details of this project see: http://cdn.forestrytasmania.com.au/uploads/File/pdf/technical_reports/DFRD_TR08_2005.pdf
  • Eucalyptus obliqua
  • saproxylic beetle
  • Warra
  • Tasmania
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2012-10-31
 
Last updated
2016-10-16
 
docid
lloyd.261.20

Grove

Forestry Tasmania

Mount Weld Altitudinal Transect Ecotonal and Baseline Altitudinal Monitoring Plots, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite
Grove
Forestry Tasmania
This joint project has been established between Forestry Tasmania, the Nature Conservation Branch of the Department of Primary Industries and Water (DPIW) and the Zoology Department of the University of Tasmania. The aim of this project is to record baseline inventory and distributional biodiversity data against which future changes in the altitudinal distribution of flora and fauna can be measured (Brown et al. 2001) in relation to climate change, succession due to fire or its absence, and other chance events. Warra is a core site within the International Biodiversity Observation Year (IBOY) global long term monitoring network. The altitudinal transect surveys have been supported by IBOY as an associated Satellite Project. For full details see http://www.warra.com/index.php/2012-05-15-18-01-11/2012-05-15-18-09-47/item/144-baseline-altitudinal-monitoring-plots
  • Mt Weld
  • Warra
  • baseline altitudinal monitoring plots
  • BAMP
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2012-10-31
 
Last updated
2015-08-02
 
docid
lloyd.259.11

Grove

Forestry Tasmania

Photopoint Images, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
Photopoint images were collected 7 Apr 2015 at each corner and centre of the Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/vicd_wrra/default
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite
  • core 1 ha
  • photography
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.786.2

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Photopoints, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
Photopoint samples are done annually to provide a visual reference to monitor change within the Core 1 ha plot of each SuperSite. This dataset comprises RAW image files of four photographs taken in autumn 2015 from each of five photopoints within the Core 1 ha plot at Warra.
  • Warra
  • forest
  • forest composition
  • vegetation structure
  • visible imagery
  • 0602
  • 0603
  • 0607
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-06-01
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.141.4

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Point Intercept Survey of Foliar Canopy Cover, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2013
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
The dataset comprises measurements of projected foliar cover in the Core 1 ha plot at the Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite. The measurements were made using the point-intercept sampling method and are part of the standard set of vegetation measurements documented in the SuperSites Vegetation Monitoring Protocols (Australian SuperSites Network, 2015). The data came from two measurement campaigns. The first done in June 2012 was in the original Core 1ha plot at Warra. The second done in October 2013 was in a 0.6 ha (60 x 100 m) extension to the western boundary of the original 1 ha plot. The 0.6 ha extension was installed to allow the creation of a “new” 1 ha Core plot in undisturbed forest within the footprint of the Warra Flux Tower. The new 1 ha Core Plot comprises the 0.6 ha extension and the western-most 0.4 ha (40 x 100 m) of the original plot. Reference: Australian SuperSites Network (2015) SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring Protocols. Version 1.1.6. The Australian SuperSites Network, Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network, Australia.
  • Warra
  • vegetation
  • forest composition
  • vegetation structure
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • 0705
  2  
Published
2015-05-25
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.131.10

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Point Intercept Transect Survey of Cover, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Flux Tower Site, 2013
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
Data from the point-intercept transect survey of cover in Warra 1 ha plot, conducted in May 2013.
  • point intersect
  • transect
  • Warra
  3  
Published
2013-06-04
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.521.4

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Relative Percent Cover of Vascular Plants, Warra, Southern Forests Experimental Forest Landscape, 2010-2011
Wardlaw
University of Tasmania
The dataset was collected as part of a broader study examining the responses of bird, plant and beetle species to the intensity of disturbance in the landscape surrounding plots of either mature tall, wet eucalypt forest or of 25-50 year-old silvicultural regeneration following clearfell harvesting. The study tested the null hypotheses that species persisting in patches of mature forest or recolonising patches of silvicultural regeneration would be insensitive to the intensity of disturbance in the surrounding landscape The study was done in 2010-11 in the Southern Forests Experimental Forest Landscape (SFEFL) – a 32 x 35 area anchored on the Warra Long-Term Ecological Research site and extending eastwards to the estuary of the Huon River. The surveys of the three taxonomic groups were done in fifty-six, 50x50m plots – 28 each in mature eucalypt forest and silvicultural regeneration. Those plots were located to sample the measured range of average disturbance intensity (based on the mix of vegetation classes) at three scales - 0.5, 1 and 2 km – in the circular landscapes surrounding the plots. The vascular plant dataset was based on cover abundance surveys of 4-6 10x10 m sub-plots in each 50 x 50 m plot- done between 2010-11.
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • 0705
  • Warra
  • Southern Forests Experimental Forest Landscape
  • vascular plants
  • forest management
  • disturbance
  • landscape ecology
  • mature forest
  • Eucalyptus obliqua
  • 0502
  1  
Published
2017-10-03
 
Last updated
2017-10-04
 
docid
supersite.884.3

Wardlaw

University of Tasmania

Scenario Based Evaluation of Landscape Futures: Tools for Development, Presentation and Assessment, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite
Forestry Tasmania
This is a part of a broader project on the social acceptability of forest management options. Land use planning is complicated as it has to accommodate different often competing social values: economic, natural and amenity. This is especially true in forested landscapes where effects of management practices can extend to beyond a human lifetime. In forest management, pressure against change, sometimes catalyzed by intense silvicultural practices, has led to public revolt and protest. Participatory planning is the key to involving the public in landscape design, yet it is difficult to convey the impact of future silvicultural operations or to determine what forest management practices the public find acceptable without adequate tools. This thesis describes the development of toolsets to assess the acceptability of forest management options and to determine how people use landscape information in making their judgments. Three toolsets were developed; the first allows the participatory development of forested landscapes; the second presents these landscapes using visual, graphical and descriptive information, allowing the public to compare, contrast and judge the social acceptability of these landscapes; and the third assesses the use of the presented information in the decision process. The incorporation of visualisation into landscape planning tools is not a new area of research, but current tools primarily focus on representing change in more familiar landscapes, such as urban areas and those changes occur generally over much short periods of time. Representing change in forested areas at a landscape scale over long time periods has two specific challenges; how to evaluate the change in landscape, and how to accurately represent the effects of the change at a landscape scale. This research addresses these challenges by (a) developing landscape performance indicators to quantify the performance of the developed scenarios in three key areas, and (b) representing the effects of the operational harvest systems via descriptive, graphical and interactive informational elements. Analysis of the developed scenarios is described and results are presented. The methods used to develop the landscape models and 3D panoramic visualisations are described. The landscape presentation tool is described in terms of the design of the interface, the interactive features enabling the comparison and selection of preferred landscapes and the different information types used to represent the landscapes. Analysis of tool set use and participant behavioral traits is described and results presented. Results showed that (a) the landscape development toolset provided a suitable framework with which to develop a range of different landscape scale forest management scenarios and (b) the landscape presentation toolset allowed members of the public to view, compare and choose their preferred forest management option from a range of different options. People used the presentation tool to view, arrange and compare the presented information in different ways. All information was seen as being useful in understanding the effects of the forest management systems on the landscape, but particular types of information were used more often and found to be more useful when comparing landscapes. For full details see http://www.warra.com/index.php/2012-05-15-18-01-11
  • landscape visualisation
  • scenario method
  • public participation
  • forest management options
  • Warra
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2012-10-31
 
Last updated
2015-08-02
 
docid
lloyd.264.8

Forestry Tasmania

Soil Characterisation, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Flux Tower Site, 2012
McIntosh
Forest Practice Authority
Soil characteristation at the Warra flux tower site: - landforms - soil profile - soil parent materials - dominant soil - soil particle size - soil chemical properties - analysis of EDTA extracts - soil bulk density
  • soil characterisation
  • Warra
  • soil
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2012-11-27
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.289.11

McIntosh

Forest Practice Authority

The Warra Silvicultural Systems Trial in Wet Eucalyptus obliqua Forest, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, From 1997
Neyland
Forestry Tasmania
Clearfell, burn and sow (CBS) is the prescribed silvicultural technique for wood production from lowland wet eucalypt forests. Its widespread adoption raises concerns, particularly due to initial aesthetics, a reduction in late successional species and structures, and a decline in the special species timbers resource when rotations of about 90 years are used. The Warra silvicultural systems trial has been established to compare CBS with five alternative treatments that were selected after a review of silvicultural systems applied in wet forests elsewhere. The alternatives include CBS with understorey islands, stripfell/patchfell, 10% dispersed retention, 30% aggregated retention and single tree/small group selection. For full details see http://www.warra.com/index.php/2012-05-15-18-01-11/2012-05-15-18-09-47/item/43-the-warra-silvicultural-systems-trial
  • silviculture
  • wet eucalypt
  • silvicultural systems
  • Warra
  • 0705
  0  
Published
2012-10-31
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
lloyd.260.9

Neyland

Forestry Tasmania

Tree Map, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Flux Tower Site, 2012
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
The data represents the mapped distribution of vascular plant species > 10 cm diameter at breast height within the 1 ha plot established around the flux tower being established in the Warra Supersite. This is intended as a once-only measurement contributing to the structural description of the 1 ha plot. The dataset provides quantitative data describing diameter and location; species; and qualitative data describing vertical position and growth stage.
  • Eucalyptus obliqua
  • natural disturbance
  • stand dynamics
  • carbon fluxes
  • biodiversity
  • climate change
  • Warra
  • 0602
  2  
Published
2012-06-20
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.199.18

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Vascular Plant Data, Direct Measure of Stems, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2012-2016
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
The dataset comprises measurements of all stems (dead or alive) >10cm dbh in the “New” Core 1-ha plot at the Warra Supersite done according to the Supersite vegetation monitoring protocols (Australian Supersites Network, 2015). The dataset includes measurements of location within the core 1-ha plot, plant taxon, diameter, status (dead or alive). Height measurements are derived from a variety of methods including direct measurement and predictions based on height – diameter regressions from a measured sample of trees. The data came from two measurement campaigns. The first done in June 2012 was in the original Core 1ha plot at Warra. The second done in October 2013 was in a 0.6 ha (60 x 100m) extension to the western boundary of the original 1-ha plot. The 0.6 ha extension was installed to allow the creation of a “new” 1 ha Core plot in undisturbed forest within the footprint of the Warra Flux Tower. The “new” 1-ha Core Plot dataset comprises the 0.6 ha extension and the western-most 0.4 ha (40 x 100m) of the original plot. The dataset updates an earlier version (Vascular Plant Data, Direct Measure of Stems, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, 2013-2015) by including the measurements for two Eucalyptus obliqua trees that had not been measured in the initial measurement campaigns. Reference: Australian Supersites Network (2015) Supersite Vegetation Monitoring Protocols. Version 1.1.6. The Australian Supersites Network, Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network, Australia. http://dx.doi.org/10.4227/05/56134C1310F16
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • 0705
  • Warra
  • vegetation
  • forest composition
  1  
Published
2015-05-25
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.129.10

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Vegetation Data, Standing Above Ground Biomass, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2016
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
The dataset comprises calculations of stem volumes, biomass (total and carbon) of all stems (dead or alive) > 10cm DBH in the Core 1-ha plot at the Warra Supersite done according to the Supersite vegetation monitoring protocols (Australian Supersites Network, 2015). The calculations have been done using an existing dataset of DBH and height measurements of all trees >10 cm DBH (asn_wrra_agb_core_1_ha_2016.csv). Reference: Australian Supersites Network (2015) Supersite Vegetation Monitoring Protocols. Version 1.1.6. The Australian Supersites Network, Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network, Australia.
  • Warra
  • biomass
  • vegetation
  • carbon
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2016-04-07
 
Last updated
2016-04-07
 
docid
supersite.636.4

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Vegetation Decomposition, Tea Bag Index, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, 2017
Wardlaw
University of Tasmania
Plant material decomposition in soil was investigated using two types of tea bags (Green and Rooibos) buried to 8 cm for 80-90 days. Weight loss was determined and contextual data collected. This experiment aligns with, and contributed to a citizen science program (www.teatime4science.org) looking at decomposition rates around the world.
  • Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Tea Bag Index
  • Plant decomposition
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0501
  2  
Published
2017-09-20
 
Last updated
2017-09-20
 
docid
supersite.873.1

Wardlaw

University of Tasmania

Vegetation Species List, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
The dataset comprises a list of all vascular plants occurring on the Core 1 ha plot at the Warra Supersite. Species taxonomy follows The Key to Tasmanian Vascular Plants (http://www.utas.edu.au/dicotkey/dicotkey/key.htm) with the nomenclature verified using the Australian Plant Name Index (https://www.anbg.gov.au/apni/apni.html). Records for each species indicate the samples that have been collected and prepared for lodgement in a herbarium (Tasmanian Herbarium); DNA genetic analysis (AusPlots Rangelands repository, University of Adelaide) and isotope analysis (University of Technology Sydney Terrestrial Ecohydrology Research Group: http://www.uts.edu.au/about/faculty-science/what-we-do/our-research-areas/ecosystem-security-research-team#).
  • Warra
  • forest
  • vegetation species
  • biological classification
  • plants
  • 0602
  • 0603
  • 0604
  • 0607
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-06-01
 
Last updated
2016-10-17
 
docid
supersite.140.8

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Vegetation Structural Description, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
A once-off general structural description according to the National Vegetation Information System (NVIS) level 6 (Australian Vegetation Attribute Manual, 2003; http://www.environment.gov.au/topics/science- and-research/databases-and-maps/national-vegetation-information-system) was carried out in 2015. Dominant growth form, cover, height and species (up to 5 species in order of dominance) for up to 3 sub-stratum per traditional strata (Ground, Mid and Upper).The dominant growth form, cover, height and species per traditional strata (Ground, Mid and Upper) were recorded. Refer to http://www.environment.gov.au/node/18931; Table 4, for listings of cover estimations and growth form.
  • Warra
  • forest
  • vegetation structure
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2016-04-04
 
Last updated
2016-04-04
 
docid
supersite.622.3

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Weather Station Data, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, 2004-2016
Wardlaw
Forestry Tasmania
Daily climate record for Warra Supersite
  • weather
  • climate
  • Warra
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-11-27
 
Last updated
2016-11-13
 
docid
lloyd.287.12

Wardlaw

Forestry Tasmania

Wildfire Chronosequence Benchmark Set of Plots for Tasmanian Wet Eucalypt Forest, Warra Tall Eucalypt SuperSite, 2005-2007
Forestry Tasmania
The Wildfire Chronosequence Project is a joint initiative of the Bushfire CRC, the University of Tasmania (School of Plant Science) and Forestry Tasmania. The project incorporates a set of permanent research plots in forest regrowing following past stand-replacing disturbance events (wildfire or timber harvesting). There are six disturbance treatments in total, each represented by a 50 x 50 m plot (with 100 m external buffer) on a northerly to westerly aspect and another on a southerly to easterly aspect. These encompass regrowth forest following wildfire's in 1898, 1934 and 1966/67, as well as equivalent plots in forest that has not experienced wildfire for over 150 years (old-growth) and forest regenerating following clearfell, burn and sow silviculture in 1966 and 2000. Six of the sites are within the Warra Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site with the remaining six sites within an adjacent area of State Forest designated as the Southern Forests Experimental Forest Landscape.
  • Warra
  • fire-dependent biodiversity
  • wildfire
  • fire ecology
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2012-10-31
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.263.10

Forestry Tasmania