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30 data packages found.

Title and Description Creator (People and Organisation)
Acoustic Sensor, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, 2012
Beringer
University of Western Australia
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • Victoria Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Whroo
  • acoustic recording
  1  
Published
2015-11-17
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.339.2

Beringer

University of Western Australia

Acoustic Sensor, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, 2013
Beringer
University of Western Australia
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Victoria Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Whroo
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-17
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.340.3

Beringer

University of Western Australia

Acoustic Sensor, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, 2014
Beringer
University of Western Australia
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Victoria Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Whroo
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-17
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.341.3

Beringer

University of Western Australia

Acoustic Sensor, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, 2015
Beringer
University of Western Australia
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Victoria Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Whroo
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2016-10-17
 
Last updated
2016-10-17
 
docid
supersite.711.2

Beringer

University of Western Australia

Acoustic Sensor, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, 2016
Beringer
University of Western Australia
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Victoria Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Whroo
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2016-10-17
 
Last updated
2016-10-17
 
docid
supersite.712.2

Beringer

University of Western Australia

Acoustic Sensor, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Wombat, 2013
Arndt
University of Melbourne
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • Victoria Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Wombat Forest
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  1  
Published
2015-11-17
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.342.4

Arndt

University of Melbourne

Acoustic Sensor, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Wombat, 2015
Arndt
University of Melbourne
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • Victoria Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Wombat Forest
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  1  
Published
2016-10-17
 
Last updated
2016-10-17
 
docid
supersite.713.2

Arndt

University of Melbourne

Ant Survey, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, Core 1 ha, 2014
Beringer
University of Western Australia
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected 18 - 21 Nov 2014 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Whroo
  • core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.836.1

Beringer

University of Western Australia

Ant Survey, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, Core 1 ha, 2015
Beringer
University of Western Australia
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected in May 2015 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Whroo
  • core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.837.2

Beringer

University of Western Australia

Ant Survey, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Wombat, Core 1 ha, 2014
Arndt
The University of Melbourne
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected 12 - 15 Dec 2014 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Wombat State Forest
  • core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.838.1

Arndt

The University of Melbourne

Ant Survey, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Wombat, Core 1 ha, 2015
Arndt
The University of Melbourne
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected in May 2015 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Wombat State Forest
  • core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.839.2

Arndt

The University of Melbourne

BASE Contextual, Soil Physico-Chemical Data, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Riggs Creek, 2013
Beringer
University of Western Australia
Soil collection and analysis of chemical and physical attributes was carried out to provide contextual data for the Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) soil microbial diversity project (http://www.bioplatforms.com/soil-biodiversity/). Nine discrete soil samples from a 25 m x 25 m quadrat, sampled at two depth ranges (0 – 10cm and 20 – 30cm). Eight samples were taken at the corners and mid-points of the 25 m x 25m sides of the quadrat, with sample taken at the centre. The nine subsamples were combined for each depth, to return a single surface and deeper soil sample per quadrat. Samples for chemical and physical analysis were air-dried and transported to CSBP laboratories, Perth, Australia.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0503
  • soil
  • physico-chemical
  • chemistry
  • Riggs Creek
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  1  
Published
2015-12-07
 
Last updated
2015-12-07
 
docid
supersite.420.2

Beringer

University of Western Australia

BASE Contextual, Soil Physico-Chemical Data, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, Core 1 ha, 2013
Beringer
University of Western Australia
Soil collection and analysis of chemical and physical attributes was carried out to provide contextual data for the Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) soil microbial diversity project (http://www.bioplatforms.com/soil-biodiversity/). Nine discrete soil samples from a 25 m x 25 m quadrat, sampled at two depth ranges (0 – 10cm and 20 – 30cm). Eight samples were taken at the corners and mid-points of the 25 m x 25m sides of the quadrat, with sample taken at the centre. The nine subsamples were combined for each depth, to return a single surface and deeper soil sample per quadrat. Samples for chemical and physical analysis were air-dried and transported to CSBP laboratories, Perth, Australia.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0503
  • soil
  • physico-chemical
  • chemistry
  • Whroo
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • core 1 ha
  1  
Published
2015-12-07
 
Last updated
2015-12-09
 
docid
supersite.422.4

Beringer

University of Western Australia

BASE Contextual, Soil Physico-Chemical Data, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Wombat, Core 1 ha, 2013
Arndt
The University of Melbourne
Soil collection and analysis of chemical and physical attributes was carried out to provide contextual data for the Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) soil microbial diversity project (http://www.bioplatforms.com/soil-biodiversity/). Nine discrete soil samples from a 25 m x 25 m quadrat, sampled at two depth ranges (0 – 10cm and 20 – 30cm). Eight samples were taken at the corners and mid-points of the 25 m x 25m sides of the quadrat, with sample taken at the centre. The nine subsamples were combined for each depth, to return a single surface and deeper soil sample per quadrat. Samples for chemical and physical analysis were air-dried and transported to CSBP laboratories, Perth, Australia.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0503
  • soil
  • physico-chemical
  • chemistry
  • Wombat forest
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  1  
Published
2015-12-07
 
Last updated
2015-12-07
 
docid
supersite.417.4

Arndt

The University of Melbourne

Bird Survey Data, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, 2015
Beringer; McHugh
University of Western Australia; Monash University
Bird surveys were carried out at the Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite Whroo node, in autumn and spring 2015 within 4-5 hours of sunrise. Four 2 ha 20 minute survey plots were carried out within 1 km of the eddy covariance flux tower, with all bird species (common name) seen or heard recorded. Incidental records outside survey time and area were also recorded.
  • 0602
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0608
  • bird survey
  • birds
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt
  • Whroo
  • VICD
  3  
Published
2016-04-06
 
Last updated
2016-04-21
 
docid
supersite.603.7

Beringer; McHugh

University of Western Australia; Monash University

Bird Survey Data, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Wombat, 2015
Arndt
The University of Melbourne
Bird surveys were carried out at the Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite Wombat node, in autumn and spring 2015 within 4-5 hours of sunrise. Four 2 ha 20 minute survey plots were carried out within 1 km of the eddy covariance flux tower, with all bird species (common name) seen or heard recorded. Incidental records outside survey time and area were also recorded.
  • bird survey
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Wombat
  • VICD
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  3  
Published
2016-04-06
 
Last updated
2016-04-21
 
docid
supersite.630.4

Arndt

The University of Melbourne

Leaf Area Index Data, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, 2014
Beringer; McHugh
University of Western Australia; Monash University
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange (Bréda, 2003). Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns (Walker et al. 1981). These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and as a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as DCP (digital cover photography) and DHP (digital hemispheric photography). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) is recommended for medium stature (10-40 m) vegetation with simple structure. DCP was originally developed for sparse to moderately dense broadleaf forest and has also been tested in sparse savanna woodland. DCP is recommended for these vegetation types and has also been suggested for more dense forests (Pekin and MacFarlane 2009). Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP) is recommended for short vegetation (4-8 m) e.g. low banksia woodland, complex (multi strata) and tall vegetation (> 40+ m) using images taken 20 m apart (MacFarlane et al. 2007).
  • LAI
  • leaf area index
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt
  • Whroo
  • VICD
  • 0502
  1  
Published
2015-11-06
 
Last updated
2016-09-25
 
docid
supersite.295.5

Beringer; McHugh

University of Western Australia; Monash University

Leaf Area Index Data, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, 2015
Beringer; McHugh
University of Western Australia; Monash University
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange (Bréda, 2003). Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns (Walker et al. 1981). These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and as a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as DCP (digital cover photography) and DHP (digital hemispheric photography). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) is recommended for medium stature (10-40 m) vegetation with simple structure. DCP was originally developed for sparse to moderately dense broadleaf forest and has also been tested in sparse savanna woodland. DCP is recommended for these vegetation types and has also been suggested for more dense forests (Pekin and MacFarlane 2009). Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP) is recommended for short vegetation (4-8 m) e.g. low banksia woodland, complex (multi strata) and tall vegetation (> 40+ m) using images taken 20 m apart (MacFarlane et al. 2007).
  • LAI
  • leaf area index
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt
  • Whroo
  • VICD
  • 0502
  3  
Published
2015-11-06
 
Last updated
2016-09-25
 
docid
supersite.292.6

Beringer; McHugh

University of Western Australia; Monash University

Leaf Area Index Data, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, 2016
Beringer; McHugh
University of Western Australia; Monash University
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange (Bréda, 2003). Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns (Walker et al. 1981). These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and as a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as DCP (digital cover photography) and DHP (digital hemispheric photography). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) is recommended for medium stature (10-40 m) vegetation with simple structure. DCP was originally developed for sparse to moderately dense broadleaf forest and has also been tested in sparse savanna woodland. DCP is recommended for these vegetation types and has also been suggested for more dense forests (Pekin and MacFarlane 2009). Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP) is recommended for short vegetation (4-8 m) e.g. low banksia woodland, complex (multi strata) and tall vegetation (> 40+ m) using images taken 20 m apart (MacFarlane et al. 2007).
  • LAI
  • leaf area index
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt
  • Whroo
  • VICD
  • 0502
  1  
Published
2016-09-25
 
Last updated
2016-09-25
 
docid
supersite.703.2

Beringer; McHugh

University of Western Australia; Monash University

Leaf Area Index Images, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, Core 1 ha, 2014
Beringer
University of Western Australia
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP) was carried out at the Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, Core 1 ha plot on 23 July 2014. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/vicd_whroo/default
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Whroo
  • Core 1 ha
  • Leaf Area Index
  • Digital Hemispheric Photography
  1  
Published
2017-01-12
 
Last updated
2017-01-12
 
docid
supersite.763.2

Beringer

University of Western Australia

Leaf Area Index Images, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, Core 1 ha, 2015
Beringer
University of Western Australia
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP) was carried out at the Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, Core 1 ha plot on 18 Mar 2015, 25 June 2015 and 07 Dec 2015. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/vicd_whroo/default
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Whroo
  • Core 1 ha
  • Leaf Area Index
  • Digital Hemispheric Photography
  1  
Published
2017-01-12
 
Last updated
2017-01-12
 
docid
supersite.764.2

Beringer

University of Western Australia

Leaf Area Index Images, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Wombat, Core 1 ha, 2015
Arndt
The University of Melbourne
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Wombat, Core 1 ha plot on 23 July 2015. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/vicd_wombat/default
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Wombat
  • Core 1 ha
  • Leaf Area Index
  • Digital Camera Photography
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2017-01-12
 
Last updated
2017-01-12
 
docid
supersite.762.3

Arndt

The University of Melbourne

Photopoint Images, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, Core 1 ha, 2015
Beringer
University of Western Australia
Photopoint images were collected 15 July 2015 at each corner and centre of the Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/vicd_whroo/default
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Whroo
  • Core 1 ha
  • Photography
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.788.3

Beringer

University of Western Australia

Photopoint Images, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Wombat, Core 1 ha, 2015
Arndt
The University of Melbourne
Photopoint images were collected 6 Aug 2015 at each corner and centre of the Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Wombat, Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Wombat Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/vicd_wombat/default
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Wombat State Forest
  • Core 1 ha
  • Photography
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.787.2

Arndt

The University of Melbourne

Site and Soil Characterisation, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, 2015
Beringer; McHugh
University of Western Australia; Monash University
This data package contains the site and soil characterisation for the Whroo node of the Victorian Dry Eucalypt Supersite. The soil pit was dug with an excavator to a depth of 1.6m (bedrock level) and samples were taken from the face of the pit at depths commensurate with identifiable layers. This analysis was undertaken in March 2015, and both field and subsequent lab work (pre-preparation) was undertaken by a contracted professional soil scientist. With the exception of bulk density and gravimetric soil moisture, physical and chemical analyses were undertaken externally by a professional laboratory (Environmental Analysis Laboratory, Southen Cross University).
  • 0503
  • soil characterisation
  • soil
  • Whroo
  1  
Published
2015-08-03
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.193.4

Beringer; McHugh

University of Western Australia; Monash University

Soil Physico-Chemical Data, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, Core 1 ha, 2015
Beringer; McHugh
University of Western Australia; Monash University
This data package contains the results of physico-chemical soil analyses for the Whroo node of the Victorian Dry Eucalypt Supersite. Two separate analyses were undertaken: one for the soil pit co-located with the tower, and another for a set of soil cores taken at designated points within the core reference grid. The pit was dug with an excavator to a depth of 1.6m (bedrock level) and samples were taken from the face of the pit at depths commensurate with identifiable layers. This analysis was undertaken in March 2015, and both field and subsequent lab work (pre-preparation) was undertaken by a contracted professional soil scientist. With the exception of bulk density and gravimetric soil moisture, physical and chemical analyses were undertaken externally by a professional laboratory (Environmental Analysis Laboratory, Southen Cross University). The second analysis was undertaken in 2013, and samples were bulked from a nine-sample strategy (for each of two depths[0-10, 10-30cm]; see Supersite Protocol documents for details), then prepared and externally analysed.
  • soil physico-chem
  • Whroo
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-08-03
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.182.12

Beringer; McHugh

University of Western Australia; Monash University

Vegetation Above Ground Biomass, Direct Measure of Stems, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, 2012
Beringer
University of Western Australia
A vegetation survey was carried out at the Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo node, at the Whroo Conservation Park, from 03 -05 April 2012. Tree diameter at breast height (1.3 m) and circumference were measured with measuring tape and height estimated using a clinometer sighted at 10 m from the base of the trees. Outliers were evident in the initial height estimations. These trees were remeasured. Tree and leaf biomass was estimated using allometric equation for the dominant tree species Eucalyptus microcarpa (Grey box). Aboveground tree biomass estimated from above measurements using locations and species-specific allometric equations as detailed in the following publication: Paul, K.I., Roxburgh, S.H., England, J.R., Ritson, P., Hobbs, T., Brooksbank, K., John Raison, R., Larmour, J.S., Murphy, S., Norris, J., Neumann, C., Lewis, T., Jonson, J., Carter, J.L., McArthur, G., Barton, C., Rose, B., 2013. Development and testing of allometric equations for estimating above-ground biomass of mixed-species environmental plantings. For. Ecol. Manag. 310, 483–494. doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2013.08.054
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Whroo
  • dbh
  • biomass
  • height
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0607
  • 0705
  2  
Published
2017-02-15
 
Last updated
2017-03-13
 
docid
supersite.599.8

Beringer

University of Western Australia

Vegetation Data, Direct Measure of Stems, Standing Above Ground Biomass, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Wombat, 2011
Beringer
Monash University
Tree inventory.
  • wombat forest
  • tree inventory
  1  
Published
2013-01-23
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.344.13

Beringer

Monash University

Vegetation Species List, Victorian Dry Eucalypt, Whroo, Core 1ha, 2015
Beringer
University of Western Australia
A complete vascular plant species list was compiled for the Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite at Whroo in April 2013. Each plant was identified to family, genus and species levels.
  • species
  • Whroo
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2015-05-25
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.124.6

Beringer

University of Western Australia

Vegetation Structural Description, Victorian Dry Eucalypt SuperSite, Whroo, 2014
Beringer
University of Western Australia
Data describes the dominant overstorey and understorey species and the percentage cover of each, classified to NVIS level 5 (http://www.environment.gov.au/topics/science‐and‐research/databases‐and‐maps/national‐vegetation‐information‐system)
  • vegetation
  • general structural description
  • NVIS level 5 description
  • dominant species
  • cover
  • dominant growth form
  • Whroo
  • Victorian Dry Eucalypt
  • Vicd
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0607
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-04-19
 
Last updated
2017-02-13
 
docid
supersite.28.13

Beringer

University of Western Australia