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28 data packages found.

Title and Description Creator (People and Organisation)
Acoustic Sensor, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2012
Stol
Adaptive Ecosystems Management CSIRO Land and Water
This data package contains acoustic sensor data recorded at the TERN Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Site 1 and Site 2. Data is in WAV format recorded at 22,050 Hz in stereo.
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-15
 
Last updated
2017-04-01
 
docid
supersite.306.9

Stol

Adaptive Ecosystems Management CSIRO Land and Water

Acoustic Sensor, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2013
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-15
 
Last updated
2017-04-01
 
docid
supersite.307.9
Acoustic Sensor, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2014
Stol
Adaptive Ecosystems Management CSIRO Land and Water
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-15
 
Last updated
2017-04-01
 
docid
supersite.308.8

Stol

Adaptive Ecosystems Management CSIRO Land and Water

Acoustic Sensor, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2015
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-16
 
Last updated
2017-04-01
 
docid
supersite.309.7
Acoustic Sensor, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2016
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2016-10-18
 
Last updated
2017-04-01
 
docid
supersite.726.4
Ant Survey, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
van Gorsel
CSIRO
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected Jan and Apr 2015 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite
  • core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.835.1

van Gorsel

CSIRO

Bird Survey, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Bago State Forest, Plots1-6, 2014
Van Gorsel; Henderson; Brannan
CSIRO O&A
Bird Survey at 6 plots. 4 plots are Eucalyptus Delegatensis dominated, 2 are Eucalyptus Pauciflora dominated. The center of the plots (lan, long) was marked and surveys took birds within a 80m radius into account. The plots were also selected with respect to the last time they were logged (YLL).
  • Bird Survey
  • Tumbarumba
  • Bago State Forest
  • wet sclerophyll
  • Eucalyptus Delegatensis
  • Eucalyptus Pauciflora
  • managed
  • native
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2014-12-09
 
Last updated
2016-10-26
 
docid
supersite.19.9

Van Gorsel; Henderson; Brannan

CSIRO O&A

Bird Survey Data, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2015
Van Gorsel; Henderson; Brannan
CSIRO O&A
Bird Survey at 6 plots. 4 plots are Eucalyptus Delegatensis dominated, 2 are Eucalyptus Pauciflora dominated. The center of the plots (lan, long) was marked and surveys took birds within a 80m radius into account. The plots were also selected with respect to the last time they were logged (YLL).
  • native
  • Bird Survey
  • Tumbarumba
  • Bago State Forest
  • wet sclerophyll
  • Eucalyptus Delegatensis
  • Eucalyptus Pauciflora
  • managed
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • 0705
  3  
Published
2015-05-19
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.73.10

Van Gorsel; Henderson; Brannan

CSIRO O&A

Coarse Woody Debris, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Keith
Australian National University
A plot-based assessment for coarse woody debris was conducted using the line intersect method as described by: Van Wagner CE 1968. The line intersect method in forest fuel sampling. Forest Science 14: 20-26. McKenzie N et al. 2001. Sampling, measurement and analytical protocols for carbon estimation in soil, litter and coarse woody debris. Technical Report No. 14 National Carbon Accounting System. Australian Greenhouse Office.
  • vegetation
  • agb
  • above ground biomass
  • Tumbarumba
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2015-09-16
 
Last updated
2016-09-12
 
docid
supersite.247.14

Keith

Australian National University

Digital Elevation Model, Bare Earth, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2012
van Gorsel; Kljun
CSIRO CMAR; University of Swansea
On 7 and 9 November 2009, a lidar survey was carried out at this Supersite. Airborne full waveform lidar and hyperspectral data in the VNIR bands was collected using the a research aircraft of Flinders University – Airborne Research Australia (ARA).
  • DEM
  • Lidar
  • Tumbarumba
  • 0502
  1  
Published
2013-02-18
 
Last updated
2016-10-12
 
docid
lloyd.374.6

van Gorsel; Kljun

CSIRO CMAR; University of Swansea

General Vegetation Structure Description, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Data describes the dominant overstorey and understorey species and the percentage cover of each, classified to NVIS level 5 (http://www.environment.gov.au/topics/science‐ and‐research/databases‐and‐maps/national‐vegetation‐information‐system)
  • 0602
  • vegetation
  • structure
  • Tumbarumba
  1  
Published
2016-06-21
 
Last updated
2016-09-12
 
docid
supersite.218.12
Leaf Area Index Data, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2014
van Gorsel
CSIRO O&A
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange (Bréda, 2003). Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns (Walker et al. 1981). These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and as a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as DCP (digital cover photography) and DHP (digital hemispheric photography). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) is recommended for medium stature (10-40 m) vegetation with simple structure. DCP was originally developed for sparse to moderately dense broadleaf forest and has also been tested in sparse savanna woodland. DCP is recommended for these vegetation types and has also been suggested for more dense forests (Pekin and MacFarlane 2009). Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP) is recommended for short vegetation (4-8 m) e.g. low banksia woodland, complex (multi strata) and tall vegetation (> 40+ m) using images taken 20 m apart (MacFarlane et al. 2007).
  • 0502
  • LAI
  • leaf area index
  • Tumbarumba
  • TUMB
  2  
Published
2015-11-06
 
Last updated
2016-09-12
 
docid
supersite.297.5

van Gorsel

CSIRO O&A

Leaf Area Index Images, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Stol
CSIRO Land and Water
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha plot on 30 Oct 2014. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/tumb/default
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • Leaf Area Index Images
  • Digital Camera Photography
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2017-01-12
 
Last updated
2017-01-12
 
docid
supersite.765.2

Stol

CSIRO Land and Water

Leaf Area Index Images, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Stol
CSIRO Land and Water
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha plot on 01 Sept 2015. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/tumb/default
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • Leaf Area Index Images
  • Digital Camera Photography
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2017-01-12
 
Last updated
2017-01-12
 
docid
supersite.766.2

Stol

CSIRO Land and Water

Maximum Vegetation Height, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2012
van Gorsel; Kljun
CSIRO CMAR; University of Swansea
On 7 and 9 November 2009, a lidar survey was carried out at this Supersite. Airborne full waveform lidar and hyperspectral data in the VNIR bands was collected using the a research aircraft of Flinders University – Airborne Research Australia (ARA).
  • DEM
  • Lidar
  • Tumbarumba
  • 0502
  1  
Published
2013-02-18
 
Last updated
2016-10-12
 
docid
lloyd.376.8

van Gorsel; Kljun

CSIRO CMAR; University of Swansea

Photopoint Images, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Van Gorsel
CSIRO
Photopoint images were collected 30 Oct 2014 at each corner and centre of the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt, Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/tumb/default
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • Photography
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.789.2

Van Gorsel

CSIRO

Seedling Survey, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Seedlings were surveyed and tagged in the Tumbarumba Core 1 ha in six transects of 20 m x 1 m.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0705
  • seedling survey
  • seedlings
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite
  • core 1 ha
  1  
Published
2015-12-21
 
Last updated
2016-06-23
 
docid
supersite.217.7
Soil Moisture, Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Sensor, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2011
Zegelin
CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research
A cosmic ray soil moisture sensor was installed at the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt Supersite on 03 Apr 2011 by the Australian Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Monitoring Network (CosmOz; http://www.ermt.csiro.au/html/cosmoz.html). CosmOz represents just one of a growing number of networks around the World. Other networks are found in USA, Germany, and the UK with other projects adopting the technology in South America, Africa and Europe. These sensors use cosmic rays originating from outer space to measure average soil moisture over an area of about 40 hectares to a depth up to 90 cm. The system measures fast neutrons that are produced from interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and top few meters of soil. The intensity of these neutrons are moderated largely by water molecules in the soil. The number of neutrons counted over a period of time is inversely proportional to the amount of water in the soil. To estimate volumetric water content, each system is calibrated against soil samples that are collected from dry and wet moisture regimes using a standard protocol. Data is collected every 60 min and uploaded to data portal infrastructure which is maintained by the University of Arizona. This infrastructure and associated web interface were established as part of the US based Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observation System (COSMOS, http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/). Collaboration between Australian and US researchers has facilitated a data hosting agreement which has now resulted in a growing international data portal for delivering and processing data from cosmic-ray probes. Tumbarumba Supersite land cover: Wet sclerophyll eucalyptus forest, Land use: native/plantation forestry, Soil type: Acidic, eutrophic red dermosol, 3 - 4 m deep Tumbarumba data can be downloaded from http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/Probes/StationDat/077/index.php
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt Supersite
  • Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture
  • CosmOz
  • COSMOS
  • 0503
  0  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.527.3

Zegelin

CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research

Soil Moisture, Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Sensor, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2012
Zegelin
CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research
A cosmic ray soil moisture sensor was installed at the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt Supersite on 03 Apr 2011 by the Australian Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Monitoring Network (CosmOz; http://www.ermt.csiro.au/html/cosmoz.html). CosmOz represents just one of a growing number of networks around the World. Other networks are found in USA, Germany, and the UK with other projects adopting the technology in South America, Africa and Europe. These sensors use cosmic rays originating from outer space to measure average soil moisture over an area of about 40 hectares to a depth up to 90 cm. The system measures fast neutrons that are produced from interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and top few meters of soil. The intensity of these neutrons are moderated largely by water molecules in the soil. The number of neutrons counted over a period of time is inversely proportional to the amount of water in the soil. To estimate volumetric water content, each system is calibrated against soil samples that are collected from dry and wet moisture regimes using a standard protocol. Data is collected every 60 min and uploaded to data portal infrastructure which is maintained by the University of Arizona. This infrastructure and associated web interface were established as part of the US based Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observation System (COSMOS, http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/). Collaboration between Australian and US researchers has facilitated a data hosting agreement which has now resulted in a growing international data portal for delivering and processing data from cosmic-ray probes. Tumbarumba Supersite land cover: Wet sclerophyll eucalyptus forest, Land use: native/plantation forestry, Soil type: Acidic, eutrophic red dermosol, 3 - 4 m deep Tumbarumba data can be downloaded from http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/Probes/StationDat/077/index.php
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt Supersite
  • Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture
  • CosmOz
  • COSMOS
  • 0503
  0  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.528.3

Zegelin

CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research

Soil Moisture, Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Sensor, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2013
Zegelin
CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research
A cosmic ray soil moisture sensor was installed at the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt Supersite on 03 Apr 2011 by the Australian Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Monitoring Network (CosmOz; http://www.ermt.csiro.au/html/cosmoz.html). CosmOz represents just one of a growing number of networks around the World. Other networks are found in USA, Germany, and the UK with other projects adopting the technology in South America, Africa and Europe. These sensors use cosmic rays originating from outer space to measure average soil moisture over an area of about 40 hectares to a depth up to 90 cm. The system measures fast neutrons that are produced from interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and top few meters of soil. The intensity of these neutrons are moderated largely by water molecules in the soil. The number of neutrons counted over a period of time is inversely proportional to the amount of water in the soil. To estimate volumetric water content, each system is calibrated against soil samples that are collected from dry and wet moisture regimes using a standard protocol. Data is collected every 60 min and uploaded to data portal infrastructure which is maintained by the University of Arizona. This infrastructure and associated web interface were established as part of the US based Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observation System (COSMOS, http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/). Collaboration between Australian and US researchers has facilitated a data hosting agreement which has now resulted in a growing international data portal for delivering and processing data from cosmic-ray probes. Tumbarumba Supersite land cover: Wet sclerophyll eucalyptus forest, Land use: native/plantation forestry, Soil type: Acidic, eutrophic red dermosol, 3 - 4 m deep Tumbarumba data can be downloaded from http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/Probes/StationDat/077/index.php
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt Supersite
  • Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture
  • CosmOz
  • COSMOS
  • 0503
  0  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.529.3

Zegelin

CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research

Soil Moisture, Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Sensor, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2014
Zegelin
CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research
A cosmic ray soil moisture sensor was installed at the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt Supersite on 03 Apr 2011 by the Australian Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Monitoring Network (CosmOz; http://www.ermt.csiro.au/html/cosmoz.html). CosmOz represents just one of a growing number of networks around the World. Other networks are found in USA, Germany, and the UK with other projects adopting the technology in South America, Africa and Europe. These sensors use cosmic rays originating from outer space to measure average soil moisture over an area of about 40 hectares to a depth up to 90 cm. The system measures fast neutrons that are produced from interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and top few meters of soil. The intensity of these neutrons are moderated largely by water molecules in the soil. The number of neutrons counted over a period of time is inversely proportional to the amount of water in the soil. To estimate volumetric water content, each system is calibrated against soil samples that are collected from dry and wet moisture regimes using a standard protocol. Data is collected every 60 min and uploaded to data portal infrastructure which is maintained by the University of Arizona. This infrastructure and associated web interface were established as part of the US based Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observation System (COSMOS, http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/). Collaboration between Australian and US researchers has facilitated a data hosting agreement which has now resulted in a growing international data portal for delivering and processing data from cosmic-ray probes. Tumbarumba Supersite land cover: Wet sclerophyll eucalyptus forest, Land use: native/plantation forestry, Soil type: Acidic, eutrophic red dermosol, 3 - 4 m deep Tumbarumba data can be downloaded from http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/Probes/StationDat/077/index.php
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt Supersite
  • Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture
  • CosmOz
  • COSMOS
  • 0503
  0  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.530.3

Zegelin

CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research

Soil Moisture, Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Sensor, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2015
Zegelin
CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research
A cosmic ray soil moisture sensor was installed at the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt Supersite on 03 Apr 2011 by the Australian Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Monitoring Network (CosmOz; http://www.ermt.csiro.au/html/cosmoz.html). CosmOz represents just one of a growing number of networks around the World. Other networks are found in USA, Germany, and the UK with other projects adopting the technology in South America, Africa and Europe. These sensors use cosmic rays originating from outer space to measure average soil moisture over an area of about 40 hectares to a depth up to 90 cm. The system measures fast neutrons that are produced from interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and top few meters of soil. The intensity of these neutrons are moderated largely by water molecules in the soil. The number of neutrons counted over a period of time is inversely proportional to the amount of water in the soil. To estimate volumetric water content, each system is calibrated against soil samples that are collected from dry and wet moisture regimes using a standard protocol. Data is collected every 60 min and uploaded to data portal infrastructure which is maintained by the University of Arizona. This infrastructure and associated web interface were established as part of the US based Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observation System (COSMOS, http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/). Collaboration between Australian and US researchers has facilitated a data hosting agreement which has now resulted in a growing international data portal for delivering and processing data from cosmic-ray probes. Tumbarumba Supersite land cover: Wet sclerophyll eucalyptus forest, Land use: native/plantation forestry, Soil type: Acidic, eutrophic red dermosol, 3 - 4 m deep Tumbarumba data can be downloaded from http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/Probes/StationDat/077/index.php
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt Supersite
  • Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture
  • CosmOz
  • COSMOS
  • 0503
  0  
Published
2015-12-15
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.531.3

Zegelin

CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research

Soil Sampling for Calibration of Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Sensor, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2012
Zegelin
CSIRO, Marine and Atmospheric Research
Soil sampling was carried out 26 Apr 2012 to calibrate the Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observation sensor. A cosmic ray soil moisture sensor was installed at the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt Supersite on 03 Apr 2011 by the Australian Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Monitoring Network (CosmOz; http://www.ermt.csiro.au/html/cosmoz.html). CosmOz sensors use cosmic rays originating from outer space to measure average soil moisture over an area of about 40 hectares to a depths of between 10cm in wet soils to 70cm in dry soils. The system measures fast neutrons that are produced from interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere and top few meters of soil. The intensity of these neutrons are moderated largely by water molecules in the soil. The number of neutrons counted over a period of time is inversely proportional to the amount of water in the soil. To estimate volumetric water content, each system is calibrated against soil samples that are collected from dry and wet moisture regimes using a standard protocol. Tumbarumba Supersite land cover: Wet sclerophyll eucalyptus forest, Land use: native/plantation forestry, Soil type: Acidic, eutrophic red dermosol, 3 - 4 m deep Tumbarumba soil calibration data can be downloaded from http://cosmos.hwr.arizona.edu/Probes/StationDat/077/calib.php
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt Supersite
  • Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture calibration
  • bulk density
  • CosmOz
  • COSMOS
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2013-07-30
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.536.7

Zegelin

CSIRO, Marine and Atmospheric Research

Vascular Plant Data, Direct Measure of Stems, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Diameter at breast height and height of all trees in the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha was determined along 10 transects of 100 m length and 10 m width.
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite
  • core 1 ha
  • standing above ground biomass
  • biomass
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0705
  1  
Published
2015-12-21
 
Last updated
2016-06-23
 
docid
supersite.566.4
Vegetation Data, Standing Above Ground Biomass, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Standing above ground biomass of vegetation in the Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha was determined using a site-specific allometric equation and diameter at breast height (DBH) and height data for stems greater than 10 cm DBH.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0705
  • vegetation
  • agb
  • above ground biomass
  • Tumbarumba
  • biomass
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite
  • core 1 ha
  1  
Published
2015-12-21
 
Last updated
2016-06-23
 
docid
supersite.216.9
Vegetation Decomposition, Tea Bag Index, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, 2017
Stol
CSIRO
Plant material decomposition in soil was investigated using two types of tea bags (Green and Rooibos) buried to 8 cm for 80-90 days. Weight loss was determined and contextual data collected. This experiment aligns with, and contributed to a citizen science program (www.teatime4science.org) looking at decomposition rates around the world.
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite
  • Tea Bag Index
  • Plant decomposition
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0501
  2  
Published
2017-09-20
 
Last updated
2017-09-20
 
docid
supersite.876.1

Stol

CSIRO

Vegetation Gentry Survey, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Gentry transects and quadrats were established to monitor the vegetation abundance, cover and structure of the mid-stratum and subordinate stratum of the Tumbarumba SuperSite Core 1 ha.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0705
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite
  • core 1 ha
  • gentry
  • mid-stratum
  • subordinate
  3  
Published
2015-12-21
 
Last updated
2016-06-24
 
docid
supersite.215.9
Vegetation Species List, Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
A complete vascular plant species list was compiled for the Tumbarumba Core 1 ha.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0705
  • vegetation
  • species
  • Tumbarumba Wet Eucalypt SuperSite
  • biodiversity
  • core 1 ha
  1  
Published
2015-12-21
 
Last updated
2016-06-23
 
docid
supersite.220.7