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26 data packages found.

Title and Description Creator (People and Organisation)
Acoustic Sensor, Alice Mulga SuperSite, 2013
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Alice Mulga Supersite
  • Mulga site
  • Ti Tree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-19
 
Last updated
2015-11-27
 
docid
supersite.354.3

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Acoustic Sensor, Alice Mulga SuperSite, 2014
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Alice Mulga Supersite
  • Mulga site
  • Ti Tree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-19
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.351.3

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Acoustic Sensor, Alice Mulga SuperSite, 2015
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Alice Mulga Supersite
  • Mulga site
  • Ti Tree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2016-10-17
 
Last updated
2016-10-17
 
docid
supersite.705.3

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Acoustic Sensor, Alice Mulga SuperSite, 2016
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Alice Mulga Supersite
  • Mulga site
  • Ti Tree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2016-10-17
 
Last updated
2016-10-17
 
docid
supersite.706.3

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Acoustic Sensor, Alice Mulga SuperSite, Mulga Site, 2017
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk). This data package contains acoustic sensor data recorded at the TERN Alice Mulga SuperSite at the Mulga site in the vicinity of the core 1 ha. Data is in WAV format recorded at 44,100 Hz in stereo. Recordings are available for listening and download at https://bioacoustics.tern.org.au/
  • TERN
  • Alice Mulga SuperSite
  • Mulga site
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • soundscape
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0608
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-10-22
 
Last updated
2017-10-22
 
docid
supersite.894.2

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Acoustic Sensor, Alice Mulga SuperSite, Ti Tree East, 2012
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • Alice Mulga Supersite
  • Ti Tree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  1  
Published
2015-11-19
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.353.4

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Acoustic Sensor, Alice Mulga SuperSite, Ti Tree East, 2013
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • Alice Mulga Supersite
  • Ti Tree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  1  
Published
2016-10-17
 
Last updated
2016-10-17
 
docid
supersite.707.2

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Acoustic Sensor, Alice Mulga SuperSite, Ti Tree East, 2014
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • Alice Mulga Supersite
  • Ti Tree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  1  
Published
2016-10-17
 
Last updated
2016-10-17
 
docid
supersite.708.2

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Acoustic Sensor, Alice Mulga SuperSite, Ti Tree East, 2015
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • Alice Mulga Supersite
  • Ti Tree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  1  
Published
2016-10-17
 
Last updated
2016-10-17
 
docid
supersite.709.4

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Acoustic Sensor, Alice Mulga SuperSite, Ti Tree East, 2016
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  • Alice Mulga Supersite
  • Ti Tree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  1  
Published
2016-10-17
 
Last updated
2016-10-17
 
docid
supersite.710.2

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Acoustic Sensor, Alice Mulga SuperSite, Ti Tree East, 2017
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk). This data package contains acoustic sensor data recorded at the TERN Alice Mulga SuperSite at the Ti Tree East site. Data is in WAV format recorded at 44,100 Hz in stereo. Recordings are available for listening and download at https://bioacoustics.tern.org.au/
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • TERN
  • Alice Mulga SuperSite
  • Ti Tree
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • soundscape
  • 0608
  0  
Published
2017-10-22
 
Last updated
2017-10-22
 
docid
supersite.895.3

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Ant Survey, Alice Mulga SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected 27 Nov - 1 Dec 2014 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Alice Mulga SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.819.2

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Ant Survey, Alice Mulga SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected in 2015 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Alice Mulga SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • ants
  • invertebrate fauna
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.822.2

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

BASE Contextual, Soil Physico-Chemical Data, Alice Mulga SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2013
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Soil collection and analysis of chemical and physical attributes was carried out to provide contextual data for the Biomes of Australian Soil Environments (BASE) soil microbial diversity project (http://www.bioplatforms.com/soil-biodiversity/).
  • Alice Mulga SuperSite
  • soil
  • chemistry
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-11-19
 
Last updated
2016-11-28
 
docid
supersite.348.3

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Bird Survey Data, Alice Mulga SuperSite, 2015
Eamus; Cleverly
University of Technology Sydney
To adequately sample the avian diversity and abundance at the TERN SuperSite Alice Mulga SuperSite, focusing upon the two OzFlux sites in the SuperSite: ASM (Alice Springs Mulga) and TTE (Ti Tree East), using structured repeatable methodologies. The national standard BirdLife Atlas Census Method would provide the baseline data for the survey. Results would be augmented by the use of several other ancillary methodologies to account for the low abundance, wide distribution and dynamic nomadism of the arid zone avifauna and also to detect nocturnal species which would usually not be encountered during daylight surveys. Results of this survey will form a dataset with which future survey results can be analysed against.
  • bird survey
  • Alice Mulga
  • avian
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-07-28
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.173.4

Eamus; Cleverly

University of Technology Sydney

Digital Elevation Model, Alice Mulga SuperSite, 2014
Eamus; Cleverly
University of Technology Sydney
Airborne full waveform lidar and hyperspectral data in the VNIR bands was collected using the research aircraft of Flinders University – Airborne Research Australia (ARA).
  • Lidar
  • DEM
  • Alice Mulga
  • 0502
  2  
Published
2015-05-26
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.136.7

Eamus; Cleverly

University of Technology Sydney

General Vegetation Structure Description, Alice Mulga SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2012
Eamus; Cleverly
University of Technology Sydney
Colloquial vegetation description derived from AusPlots survey. Average heights determined from point intercept survey data available from the aekos data portal (http://www.aekos.org.au/home)
  • vegetation
  • structure
  • Alice Mulga
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2015-10-06
 
Last updated
2016-09-12
 
docid
supersite.255.6

Eamus; Cleverly

University of Technology Sydney

Leaf Area Index Data, Alice Mulga SuperSite, 2014
Eamus; Cleverly
University of Technology, Sydney
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and (Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Alice Mulga SuperSite core 1 ha.
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • Alice Mulga SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • Leaf Area Index
  • LAI
  • Digital Canopy Photography
  1  
Published
2015-11-26
 
Last updated
2015-11-27
 
docid
supersite.375.4

Eamus; Cleverly

University of Technology, Sydney

Leaf Area Index Data, Alice Mulga SuperSite, 2015
Eamus; Cleverly
University of Technology, Sydney
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and (Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Alice Mulga SuperSite core 1 ha.
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • Alice Mulga SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • Leaf Area Index
  • LAI
  • Digital Canopy Photography
  1  
Published
2015-11-26
 
Last updated
2015-11-27
 
docid
supersite.377.4

Eamus; Cleverly

University of Technology, Sydney

Leaf Area Index Images, Alice Mulga SuperSite, 2014
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and (Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Alice Mulga SuperSite Core 1 ha on 8 Aug 2014 and 27 Nov 2014. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/alic/default
  • Alice Mulga SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • Leaf Area Index
  • Digital Canopy Photography
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2016-11-23
 
Last updated
2016-11-23
 
docid
supersite.733.2

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Leaf Area Index Images, Alice Mulga SuperSite, 2015
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and (Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Alice Mulga SuperSite Core 1 ha on 26 Mar 2015, 14 Jun 2015 and 14 Aug 2015. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/alic/default
  • Alice Mulga SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • Leaf Area Index
  • Digital Canopy Photography
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2016-11-23
 
Last updated
2016-11-23
 
docid
supersite.734.2

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Leaf Area Index Images, Alice Mulga SuperSite, 2016
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and (Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Alice Mulga SuperSite Core 1 ha on 8 Mar 2016 and 10 July 2016. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/alic/default
  • Alice Mulga SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • Leaf Area Index
  • Digital Canopy Photography
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2016-11-23
 
Last updated
2016-11-23
 
docid
supersite.735.2

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Photopoint Images, Alice Mulga SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Eamus
University of Technology Sydney
Photopoint images were collected 15 Aug 2015 at each corner and centre of the Alice Mulga SuperSite Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. Alice Mulga SuperSite Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/alic/default
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Alice Mulga SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • Photography
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.805.2

Eamus

University of Technology Sydney

Site and Soil Characterisation, Alice Mulga SuperSite, 2013
Eamus; Cleverly
University of Technology Sydney
Site and soil characterisation at the Alice Mulga flux tower site.
  • soil
  • soil characterisation
  • Alice Mulga
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2015-06-02
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.144.6

Eamus; Cleverly

University of Technology Sydney

Vascular Plant Data, Direct Measure of Stems, Alice Mulga SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Cleverly
University of Technology, Sydney
This dataset contains diameter at breast height (1.3 m) and tree height measured in the core plot (Focal Hectare) at the Alice Springs SuperSite (AS3). The core plot is located within the footprint of the Alice Springs Mulga OzFlux tower. The objective of this study is to estimate the live, aboveground biomass in the Mulga woodland. Live biomass is estimated from allometric scaling of tree height (H) and diameter at breast height (DBH) or basal area (BA). Measurements were collected using a DBH tape, callipers and a laser rangefinder. Measurements were made during a brief break between summer rainstorms, thereby limiting the number of trees that could be measured. Thus, 10x10 m sub-plots were chosen at random, from which the timing and conditions permitted complete measurement of six sub-plots. All trees that were measured have been located by GPS, tagged, and labelled for return measurements. Altogether, DBH (200 stems that were larger than 1 cm diameter) was measured in 86 trees. Another 13 trees were measured that were either dead or did not have any stems that were larger than 1 cm diameter at BH. Amongst the 86 trees in the DBH study, 445 dead stems that were larger than 1 cm diameter were counted. Of the 200 stems, the size distribution was: 1–5 cm diameter: 154 stems 5–10 cm diameter: 27 stems >10 cm diameter: 19 stems
  • Alice Springs SuperSite
  • diameter at breast height
  • tree height
  • basal diameter
  • Mulga
  • Acacia aptaneura
  • Acacia aneura
  • Psydrax latifolia
  • Eremophila latrobei ssp glabra
  • above ground biomass
  • focal hectare
  • 0602
  10  
Published
2014-02-17
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.594.21

Cleverly

University of Technology, Sydney

Vegetation Data, Standing Above Ground Biomass, Alice Mulga SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Eamus; Cleverly
University of Technology, Sydney
Standing above ground biomass (AGB) for the Alice Mulga SuperSite Core 1 hectare plot was calculated based on measurements taken in 2014. Measurements included the D20 Diameter of base 20 cm above ground level) and height. Allometry for estimates of AGB (kg) were based on: Paul et al. (2015) Testing the generality of total above-ground biomass allometry across plant functional types at the continental scale. Glob Chang Biol. doi: 10.1111/gcb.13201. [Epub ahead of print]. and Navar et al. 2013. Regional aboveground biomass equations for North American arid and semi-arid forests. Journal of Arid Environments 97, 127-135.
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • Alice Mulga SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • standing above ground biomass
  1  
Published
2015-11-25
 
Last updated
2016-01-28
 
docid
supersite.359.6

Eamus; Cleverly

University of Technology, Sydney