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53 data packages found.

Title and Description Creator (People and Organisation)
Acoustic Sensor, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Credo, 2012
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • Credo
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-16
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.321.4

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Acoustic Sensor, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Credo, 2013
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • Credo
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-16
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.322.4

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Acoustic Sensor, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Credo, 2014
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • Credo
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-16
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.323.4

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Acoustic Sensor, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Credo, 2015
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • Credo
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2016-10-18
 
Last updated
2016-10-18
 
docid
supersite.717.2

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Acoustic Sensor, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Credo, 2016
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • Credo
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2016-10-18
 
Last updated
2016-10-18
 
docid
supersite.718.2

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Acoustic Sensor, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Credo-1, 2012
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Acoustic sensors provide an effective means for monitoring biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. The Australian SuperSite Network (SuperSites) provides the research community with national scale acoustic sensor data collected at each SuperSite. Acoustic sensors are configured to record for 12 hours per day (6 hours around dawn and 6 hours around dusk).
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • Credo
  • acoustic recording
  • bioacoustic
  • bird
  • fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-11-16
 
Last updated
2015-12-01
 
docid
supersite.317.2

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Analysis of the stable isotope ratio of carbon 13 for leaf traits of Maireana sedifolia, Ptilotus obovatus and Eremophila scoparia, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Core 1 ha Plot, 2013
Prober; Macfarlane
CSIRO Ecosystem Science
An analysis of stable isotopes for leaf traits was undertaken in the Salmon Gum plot at the Credo Great Western Woodland supersite. Leaves from three individuals from three species were collected and analysed for carbon isotopic composition using a Picarro G2121-i Analyser. The samples were collected once on the 17th of December, 2013.
  • isotopes
  • leaf traits
  • carbon
  • Credo
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • GWWL
  • 0606
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2014-10-23
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.5.9

Prober; Macfarlane

CSIRO Ecosystem Science

Ant abundance and functional classification in Eucalyptus salubris woodlands across a time since fire chronosequence, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2012
Gosper; Pettit; Andersen; Yates; Prober; Shattuck; Andersen; Andersen; Gosper; Pettit; Andersen; Yates; Prober
CSIRO and Department of Parks and Wildlife; CSIRO; Department of Parks and Wildlife
Recurrent fire is a dominant disturbance in Mediterranean-climate landscapes. As vegetation recovers after fire its composition and structure systematically changes, affecting the availability of resources for fauna and mediating physical conditions. According to the habitat accommodation model, these changes drive a succession of animal species, which enter and leave according to their habitat requirements. The Great Western Woodlands region (http://www.tern-supersites.net.au/supersites/gwwl) supports the world’s largest remaining area of Mediterranean-climate woodland, which in mosaic with mallee, shrublands and salt lakes cover an area of 160 000 km2. Eucalyptus woodlands in this region are typically fire-sensitive, and fire return intervals recorded over recent decades have been much shorter than the long-term average. This has led to considerable conservation concern regarding the loss of mature woodlands, and has highlighted a need to better understand how animal communities change with time since fire. Using a time since fire chronosequence exceeding 300 years in non-resprouting Eucalyptus salubris woodlands, we sampled ant species abundance and richness in spring 2012 and classified species into functional groups. Further details on the study objectives, data and findings can be found in Gosper et al. (2015). Gosper CR, Pettit MJ, Andersen AN, Yates CJ, Prober SP (2015) Multi-century dynamics of ant communities following fire in Mediterranean-climate woodlands: are changes congruent with vegetation succession? Forest Ecology and Management 342, 30-38. doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2015.01.006
  • ant functional groups
  • Eucalypt woodland
  • fire interval
  • fire management
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • succession
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0608
  2  
Published
2015-10-27
 
Last updated
2015-10-28
 
docid
supersite.281.5

Gosper; Pettit; Andersen; Yates; Prober; Shattuck; Andersen; Andersen; Gosper; Pettit; Andersen; Yates; Prober

CSIRO and Department of Parks and Wildlife; CSIRO; Department of Parks and Wildlife

Ant Survey, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected in Nov 2014 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • Salmongum plot
  • ants
  • Credo
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.827.1

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Ant Survey, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Ants are Australia’s dominant faunal group in terms of biomass and energy flow. They occupy all trophic levels, act as ecosystem engineers, feature in many mutualistic interactions with plants, and are a key food resource for many vertebrates. Ants are also Australia’s best studied insect group in terms of biogeography and community dynamics. They are the most widely used invertebrate bio-indicators in environmental assessment and monitoring. Ants were collected in March 2015 and stored in ethanol for taxonomic assessment.
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • Core 1 ha
  • Salmongum plot
  • ants
  • Credo
  • invertebrate fauna
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  0  
Published
2017-03-12
 
Last updated
2017-03-12
 
docid
supersite.828.2

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Bird Survey Data, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Credo Station, 2012
BirdLife Australia
This file includes the 2012 bird datasets for Credo station collected by BirdLife Australia, including four plots in the Credo flux tower footprint (labelled OzFlux site).
  • birds
  • BirdLife Australia
  • eucalypt woodland
  • semi-arid
  • climate change
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2013-05-13
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
lloyd.440.24

BirdLife Australia

Bird Survey Data, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Credo Station, 2013
BirdLife Australia
This file includes the bird datasets for Credo station collected by BirdLife Australia, from January to April 2013.
  • birds
  • BirdLife Australia
  • eucalypt woodland
  • semi-arid
  • climate change
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2013-12-11
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
lloyd.562.5

BirdLife Australia

Bird Survey Data, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Credo Station, 201306-201402
BirdLife Australia
This file includes the bird datasets for Credo station collected by BirdLife Australia, from June 2013 to February 2014.
  • birds
  • BirdLife Australia
  • eucalypt woodland
  • semi-arid
  • climate change
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2014-05-26
 
Last updated
2015-10-29
 
docid
lloyd.639.6

BirdLife Australia

Bird Survey Data, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Credo Station, 2014
BirdLife Australia
This file includes the bird datasets for Credo station collected by BirdLife Australia, during April 2014, and from May 2014 to November 2014. .
  • birds
  • BirdLife Australia
  • eucalypt woodland
  • semi-arid
  • climate change
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • 0608
  2  
Published
2014-12-01
 
Last updated
2015-05-17
 
docid
supersite.8.6

BirdLife Australia

Bird Survey Data, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Credo Station, 2015
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Science
This file includes the bird datasets for Credo station collected on 7th June, 2015
  • birds
  • bird survey
  • BirdLife Australia
  • eucalypt woodland
  • semi-arid
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • Credo
  • 0608
  1  
Published
2015-08-23
 
Last updated
2016-09-12
 
docid
supersite.229.5

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Science

Bowen Ratio Energy Balance Data, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 20120518-20120817
Prober; Macfarlane
CSIRO Ecosystem Science
Bowen ratio energy balance Flux tower site and measuring station records global solar radiation at 3m, mean wind speed and gust speed at 3m, air temperature and relative humidity at 1m and 3m from three sensors at each height.
  • measuring station
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • bowen ratio
  • energy balance
  • gwwl
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2012-11-22
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.267.14

Prober; Macfarlane

CSIRO Ecosystem Science

Changes in Plant Diversity Indices, Composition and Cover in Eucalyptus salubris Woodlands Across Time Since Fire Chronosequence, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2012
Gosper; Prober; Yates
Science Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife and CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; Science Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife
Disturbances are important ecosystem processes affecting patterns of species diversity (including species richness, diversity and evenness) and community composition. Determining appropriate disturbance regimes for particular ecosystems is thus an important issue for natural resource management. There have been few studies of the response of plant species composition and diversity to fire in ‘fire-sensitive’ Mediterranean-climate woodlands, where the dominant overstorey trees are typically killed by fire, resulting in dense post-fire recruitment. The Great Western Woodlands (GWW) region of south-western Australia supports the world’s largest remaining area of Mediterranean-climate woodland, which in mosaic with mallee, shrublands and salt lakes cover an area of 160 000 km2. Eucalyptus woodlands in this region are typically fire-sensitive, and fire return intervals recorded over recent decades have been much shorter than the long-term average. This has lead to considerable conservation concern regarding the loss of mature woodlands, and has highlighted a need to better understand how plant species composition and diversity changes with time since fire. We measured changes in diversity indices and floristic composition in Eucalyptus salubris woodlands with increasing time since fire at 72 50 x 50 m plots using a space-for-time approach. To estimate stand ages for this study we used satellite imagery, growth ring counts and relationships between growth ring counts and plant size, resulting in an estimated time since fire range sampled of 3 to 370 years.
  • ecological fire management
  • fire interval
  • Mediterranean-type ecosystem
  • obligate seeder
  • space-for-time
  • succession
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • gwwl
  • 0503
  5  
Published
2012-11-22
 
Last updated
2015-10-29
 
docid
lloyd.276.21

Gosper; Prober; Yates

Science Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife and CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; Science Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife

Digital Elevation Model, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
Prober; Macfarlane
CSIRO Ecosystem Science; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
The DEM provided consists of two files. The TIFF file illustrates the topography of the area surrounding the tower and core monitoring plots of the Great Western Woodlands Supersite. It corresponds to an area approximately 43 x 43 km surrounding the tower (shown as a red star). The ZIP file contains the 3 second DEM from the USGS for the area in BIL format with associated header and other files.
  • biodiversity
  • eucalypt woodland
  • semi-arid
  • fire
  • climate change
  • invasive species
  • groundwater
  • mining
  • pastoralism
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • 0502
  2  
Published
2012-04-04
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.134.21

Prober; Macfarlane

CSIRO Ecosystem Science; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Drill core soil data, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Credo Station, 2013
Prober; Macfarlane
CSIRO Ecosystem Science
Chemical and physical soil analysis results for drill cores to bedrock in 6 plots at the Great Western Woodland supersite (CREDO; salmon_core_1ha, gimlet, blackbutt, redwood, mulga, saltbush) analysed in Jan 2014.
  • soil chemistry
  • soil texture
  • Credo
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • GWWL
  • 0503
  1  
Published
2014-10-23
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.4.5

Prober; Macfarlane

CSIRO Ecosystem Science

General Vegetation Structure Description, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2013
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Science
Colloquial vegetation description derived from AusPlots survey. Average heights determined from point intercept survey data available from the aekos data portal (http://www.aekos.org.au/home)
  • vegetation
  • vegetation structure description
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2015-10-24
 
Last updated
2016-09-12
 
docid
supersite.257.4

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Science

Groundwater data from two plots, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2014
Prober; Macfarlane
CSIRO Ecosystem Science
Groundwater data from two plots at the GWW Supersite (Salmongum and Blackbutt), sampled since April 2014.
  • groundwater
  • pH
  • EC
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • 0406
  1  
Published
2016-03-29
 
Last updated
2016-03-29
 
docid
supersite.591.5

Prober; Macfarlane

CSIRO Ecosystem Science

Images, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2013
Macfarlane
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Images taken on field trips to Credo/GWW Supersite. These images illustrate the recent drilling campaign, and also some fallen tree stems that have obvious vertical root structures (i.e. either tap roots or sinker roots).
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • Credo
  • images
  2  
Published
2013-06-03
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.516.6

Macfarlane

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Leaf Area Index and Cover, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Salmongum 1 ha plot, 2015
Prober; Macfarlane
CSIRO Ecosystem Science
Leaf area index and cover of the salmongum 1ha plot at the GWW Supersite, collected during September 2015.
  • LAI
  • leaf area index
  • GWWL
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • 0502
  1  
Published
2015-11-10
 
Last updated
2016-09-12
 
docid
supersite.304.5

Prober; Macfarlane

CSIRO Ecosystem Science

Leaf Area Index and Cover of Four 1 ha Plots, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2013
Prober; Macfarlane
CSIRO Ecosystem Science
Leaf area index and cover of four 1 ha plots at the GWW Supersite, collected during October 2013
  • leaf area index
  • LAI
  • digital cover photography
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • GWW
  • 0502
  4  
Published
2013-11-06
 
Last updated
2016-09-12
 
docid
lloyd.547.11

Prober; Macfarlane

CSIRO Ecosystem Science

Leaf Area Index Images, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Blackbutt plot, 2013
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Great Western Woodlands, Blackbutt plot on 17 Oct 2013. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/gwwl/default
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • Blackbutt
  • Leaf Area Index Images
  • Credo
  1  
Published
2016-12-05
 
Last updated
2016-12-07
 
docid
supersite.743.3

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Leaf Area Index Images, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2013
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Great Western Woodlands, Core 1 ha, Salmongum plot on 16 Oct 2013. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/gwwl/default
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • core 1 ha
  • Salmongum plot
  • Leaf Area Index Images
  • Credo
  1  
Published
2016-12-05
 
Last updated
2016-12-07
 
docid
supersite.744.3

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Leaf Area Index Images, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Great Western Woodlands, Core 1 ha, Salmongum plot on 17 Sept 2014. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/gwwl/default
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • core 1 ha
  • Salmongum plot
  • Leaf Area Index Images
  • Credo
  1  
Published
2016-12-05
 
Last updated
2016-12-07
 
docid
supersite.745.3

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Leaf Area Index Images, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Great Western Woodlands, Core 1 ha, Salmongum plot on 16 Sept 2015. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/gwwl/default
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • core 1 ha
  • Salmongum plot
  • Leaf Area Index Images
  • Credo
  1  
Published
2016-12-05
 
Last updated
2016-12-07
 
docid
supersite.746.3

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Leaf Area Index Images, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Gimlet Plot, 2013
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Great Western Woodlands, Gimlet plot on 17 Oct 2013. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/gwwl/default
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • Gimlet plot
  • Leaf Area Index Images
  • Credo
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2016-12-05
 
Last updated
2016-12-07
 
docid
supersite.747.3

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Leaf Area Index Images, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Gimlet Plot, 2014
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Great Western Woodlands, Gimlet plot on 16 Sept 2014. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/gwwl/default
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • Gimlet plot
  • Leaf Area Index Images
  • Credo
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2016-12-05
 
Last updated
2016-12-07
 
docid
supersite.748.3

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Leaf Area Index Images, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Redgum Plot, 2013
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Leaf area index (LAI) can be defined as the total one sided area of leaf tissue per unit area of ground and is a key derived parameter that is associated with water and light interception, radiation transfer, water and carbon exchange. Canopy cover can be defined as the fraction of ground shaded by the vertical projection of tree crowns. These measures may be used as proxies for actual canopy leaf area. Leaf area index is the preferred measure of cover for vegetation and is a key variable used in total biomass estimation and in carbon cycling prediction models. Indirect measures of LAI include digital photographic methods using flat or hemispherical images, referred to respectively as Digital Cover Photography (DCP) and Digital Hemispheric Photography (DHP). LAI measurements are carried out at each SuperSite using the most appropriate method for the vegetation type present. Digital Cover Photography (DCP) was carried out at the Great Western Woodlands, Redgum plot on 17 Oct 2013. Leaf Area Index images are available for viewing and download from the TERN SuperSites BioImage Portal http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/lai/gwwl/default
  • 0501
  • 0602
  • 0607
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • Redgum plot
  • Leaf Area Index Images
  • Credo
  1  
Published
2016-12-05
 
Last updated
2016-12-07
 
docid
supersite.749.3

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Leaf Level Physiology, Chemistry and Structural Traits, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2014
Fürstenau Togashi; Bloomfield; Prentice; Evans; Atkin; Prober; Macfarlane
Macquarie University; Australian National University; CSIRO Ecosystem Science
Set-up of ACi curves, N, P and LMA values for dominant species. Establish the extent to which rates of light saturated photosynthesis, Vcmax and Jmax change in response to associated traits and to climatic moisture in the Great Western Woodlands. Experimental design and methods: In April and October 2013, we surveyed ACi curves and related leaf traits (area:mass ratios, and concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus) in 37 species growing at the Great Western Woodlands TERN - SuperSite. Leaves were sampled from different trees ranging from 1 to 4 replicates per specie. Asat(light saturated photosynthesis), Amax (CO2 saturated photosynthesis), Ci (intercellular partial pressure of CO2) and Rlight(CO2 evolution from mitochondria in the light, other than that associated with the PCO cycle) were used to calculate rates of Vcmax (maximum velocity of the carboxylase) and Jmax (maximum rate of carboxylation allowed by the electron transport). Vcmax and Jmax were corrected for temperature.
  • Photosynthesis
  • leaf respiration
  • leaf nitrogen
  • leaf phosphorus
  • ACi curves
  • Vcmax
  • Jmax
  • CO2 saturation
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2015-11-08
 
Last updated
2015-11-08
 
docid
supersite.302.2

Fürstenau Togashi; Bloomfield; Prentice; Evans; Atkin; Prober; Macfarlane

Macquarie University; Australian National University; CSIRO Ecosystem Science

Leaf Trait and Stable Isotope Data, Eucalyptus salubris, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2012
Prober; McLean
CSIRO
Leaf trait and carbon and oxygen isotope data for 10-30 E. salubris trees in the Credo flux tower footprint. Includes associated soil chemical analysis.
  • Dominant eucalypt
  • leaf traits
  • isotopes
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • gwwl
  • 0602
  5  
Published
2013-06-03
 
Last updated
2014-11-20
 
docid
lloyd.506.14

Prober; McLean

CSIRO

Litterfall from Four 1 ha Plots, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2013-2014
Prober; Macfarlane
CSIRO Ecosystem Science
Litterfall data from fifteen litter traps in each of four 1 ha plots at the GWW Supersite, installed in December 2013.
  • litterfall
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2014-05-26
 
Last updated
2015-10-29
 
docid
lloyd.635.9

Prober; Macfarlane

CSIRO Ecosystem Science

Photopoint Images, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2014
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Photopoint images were collected 10 Dec 2014 at each corner and centre of the Great Western Woodlands SuperSite Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. Great Western Woodlands SuperSite Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/gwwl/default
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • core 1 ha
  • Salmongum plot
  • Photography
  • Credo
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.796.2

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Photopoint Images, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2015
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Photopoint images were collected 16 Sept 2015 at each corner and centre of the Great Western Woodlands SuperSite Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. Great Western Woodlands SuperSite Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/gwwl/default
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • core 1 ha
  • Salmongum plot
  • Photography
  • Credo
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.797.2

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Photopoint Images, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2016
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Photopoint images were collected 16 Mar and 18 Sept 2016 at each corner and centre of the Great Western Woodlands SuperSite Core 1 ha vegetation plot following the SuperSite Vegetation Monitoring protocol (http://www.supersites.net.au/publications-and-resources/resources-for-supersiteusers) using the Five Photopoint method. At each corner photos were taken from circa 1.3 m height horizontally in North, South, West, East direction. At the Centre point photos were taken horizontally pointing towards NE, NW, SE, SW. Great Western Woodlands SuperSite Photopoint images are available for viewing and download from http://bioimages.supersites.net.au/data/photopoint/gwwl/default
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • core 1 ha
  • Salmongum plot
  • Photography
  • Credo
  1  
Published
2017-02-12
 
Last updated
2017-02-12
 
docid
supersite.798.2

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Plant Functional Type Classification, Richness and Cover in Eucalyptus salubris Woodlands Across Time Since Fire Chronosequence, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2010-2011
Gosper; Prober; Yates
Science and Conservation Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife and CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; Science and Conservation Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife
Plant Functional Types (PFTs) are groupings of plants based on traits relevant to processes of vegetation change, allowing generalised predictions of vegetation responses to similar disturbances elsewhere. Recurrent fire is a dominant disturbance in Mediterranean-climate landscapes, yet there have been no studies of how a PFT classification can enhance understanding of vegetation change due to time since fire in ‘fire-sensitive’ Mediterranean-climate woodlands, where the dominant overstorey trees are typically killed by fire. The Great Western Woodlands (GWW) region of south-western Australia supports the world’s largest remaining area of Mediterranean-climate woodland, which in mosaic with mallee, shrublands and salt lakes cover an area of 160 000 km2. Eucalyptus woodlands in this region are typically fire-sensitive, and fire return intervals recorded over recent decades have been much shorter than the long-term average. This has led to considerable conservation concern regarding the loss of mature woodlands, and has highlighted a need to better understand how plant communities change with time since fire. We measured changes in PFT richness and cover in Eucalyptus salubris woodlands with increasing time since fire at 72 50 x 50 m plots using a space-for-time approach. To estimate stand ages for this study we used satellite imagery, growth ring counts and relationships between growth ring counts and plant size, resulting in an estimated time since fire range sampled of 3 to 370 years.
  • life-form
  • ecological fire management
  • fire interval
  • Mediterranean-type ecosystem
  • seed dispersal
  • space-for-time
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  3  
Published
2014-05-27
 
Last updated
2014-11-21
 
docid
lloyd.644.4

Gosper; Prober; Yates

Science and Conservation Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife and CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; Science and Conservation Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife

Point Intercept Transect Survey of Cover and Shrub Survey, Great Western Woodlands,Core 1 ha, Gimlet plots, 2013
Prober
CSIRO
Floristics 1000 line intercepts (5 north-south and 5 east-west transects with one point per m) was undertaken using standard AusPlots methodology at the Great Western Woodlands SuperSite Salmon Gums (SG100) plot. Shrubs were measured with mature heights >0.5m in the Core 1 ha (Salmon Gums SG100) and Gimlet (200W).
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • biomass
  • agb
  • core 1 ha
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • GWWL
  • gimlet
  2  
Published
2015-12-09
 
Last updated
2015-12-09
 
docid
supersite.459.2

Prober

CSIRO

Sapwood Depth, Density and Water Content from Eight Trees of Four Eucalypt species, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 201305
Prober; Macfarlane
CSIRO Ecosystem Science
Sapwood depth, density and water content from eight trees of four eucalypt species at the Great Western Woodlands Flux tower site, collected during April 2013.
  • sapwood depth
  • wood density
  • water content
  • eucalyptus
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • GWW
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2013-05-16
 
Last updated
2015-10-29
 
docid
lloyd.442.14

Prober; Macfarlane

CSIRO Ecosystem Science

Soil Pit Data, Soil Characterisation, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2012
Prober
CSIRO
Description and soil chemical analysis of soil pit adjacent to Credo tower, in Salmon gum (Eucalyptus salmonophloia) woodland of the Great Western Woodlands supersite.
  • soil chemistry
  • soil structural description
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • 0503
  3  
Published
2012-06-26
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.223.35

Prober

CSIRO

Vascular Plant Data, Direct Measure of Stems, Above Ground Biomass, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Blackbutt, Redwood Plots, 2013
Prober; Macfarlane
CSIRO Ecosystem Science
Diameter at breast height of trees, basal area, biomass and sapwood area of four 1 ha plots at the GWW Supersite, collected during October 2013
  • dbh
  • basal area
  • biomass
  • sapwood area
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • 0602
  3  
Published
2015-12-14
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
supersite.501.3

Prober; Macfarlane

CSIRO Ecosystem Science

Vascular Plant Data, Direct Measure of Stems, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Core 1 ha, Gimlet plots, 2012
Prober
CSIRO
Tree diameters at breast height and tree height were measured at the Great Western Woodlands SuperSite Salmon Gums, Core 1 ha and the Gimlet 200W plot.
  • dbh
  • core 1 ha
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • GWWL
  • gimlet
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  2  
Published
2015-12-09
 
Last updated
2015-12-09
 
docid
supersite.453.3

Prober

CSIRO

Vegetation Above Ground Biomass, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Core 1 ha, Gimlet plots, 2012
Prober
CSIRO
Standing above ground biomass was determined for the Great Western Woodlands SuperSite Core 1 ha Salmon Gums plot and the Gimlet 200W plot were calculated from allometric regression published in Jonson and Freudenberger (2011) A. J. Bot. 59:639-652.
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • biomass
  • agb
  • core 1 ha
  • Great Western Woodlands SuperSite
  • GWWL
  • gimlet
  4  
Published
2015-12-09
 
Last updated
2015-12-14
 
docid
supersite.456.3

Prober

CSIRO

Vegetation Floristic Data, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, Core 1 ha, 2013
Prober
CSIRO
Floristic survey data and 1000 points of cover. Floristic survey was undertaken and 1000 point intercepts recorded along 10 lines (5 north-south, 5 east-west with one point per meter) for SG100E according to Ausplots methodology (Foulkes et al., 2011).
  • Eucalypt
  • floristics
  • salmonophloia
  • woodland floristics
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • gwwl
  • 0602
  1  
Published
2013-12-18
 
Last updated
2016-10-10
 
docid
lloyd.564.9

Prober

CSIRO

Vegetation Floristic Data, Great Western Woodlands Supersite, Core 1 ha Plot, 2014
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Science
Floristic survey data and 1000 points of cover. Floristic survey was undertaken and 1000 point intercepts recorded along 10 lines (5 north-south, 5 east-west with one point per meter) for SG100E according to Ausplots methodology (Foulkes et al., 2011).
  • Eucalypt floristics
  • salmonophloia
  • woodland floristics
  • GWWL
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • SG100E
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2015-05-25
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.126.6

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Science

Vegetation Floristic Data, Great Western Woodlands Supersite, Core 1 ha Plot, 2015
Prober
CSIRO Ecosystem Science
Floristic survey data and 1000 points of cover. Floristic survey was undertaken and 1000 point intercepts recorded along 10 lines (5 north-south, 5 east-west with one point per meter) for SG100E according to Ausplots methodology (Foulkes et al., 2011).
  • Eucalypt floristics
  • salmonophloia
  • woodland floristics
  • GWWL
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • SG100E
  • 0501
  • 0502
  • 0602
  • 0607
  1  
Published
2016-03-02
 
Last updated
2016-03-02
 
docid
supersite.583.2

Prober

CSIRO Ecosystem Science

Vegetation Structure in Eucalyptus salubris Woodlands Across Time Since Fire Chronosequence, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2010-2012
Gosper; Prober; Yates
Science and Conservation Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife and CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; Science and Conservation Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife
Recurrent fire is a dominant disturbance in Mediterranean-climate landscapes. In infrequently-burnt communities, vegetation structure, habitat features and fuel availability can change over time-scales much longer than can be measured using contemporary remote-sensing approaches, creating challenges for conservation and fire management. The Great Western Woodlands (GWW) region of south-western Australia supports the world’s largest remaining area of Mediterranean-climate woodland, which in mosaic with mallee, shrublands and salt lakes cover an area of 160 000 km2. Eucalyptus woodlands in this region are typically fire-sensitive, and fire return intervals recorded over recent decades have been much shorter than the long-term average. This has led to considerable conservation concern regarding the loss of mature woodlands, and has highlighted a need to better understand how plant communities change with time since fire. To characterize longer-term patterns of vegetation structural change, we measured vegetation cover, ground cover, tree density and stand basal area across a multi-century time-since-fire sequence derived from growth ring-size relationships in fire-sensitive Eucalyptus salubris woodlands. The estimated time since fire range of the 76 sample sites ranged from 2 to 370+ years.
  • ecological fire management
  • fire interval
  • Mediterranean-type ecosystem
  • space-for-time
  • succession
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  1  
Published
2014-05-27
 
Last updated
2015-10-29
 
docid
lloyd.646.6

Gosper; Prober; Yates

Science and Conservation Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife and CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; Science and Conservation Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife

Visual Fuel Hazard Assessment in Eucalyptus salubris Woodlands Across Time Since Fire Chronosequence, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2012
Gosper; Prober; Yates
Science and Conservation Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife and CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; Science and Conservation Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife
Understanding fire behaviour and vegetation flammability is important for predicting the consequences of fires. Visual assessments of fuel, such as those developed in Project Vesta, have been widely applied to facilitate rapid data acquisition to support fire behaviour models. However, the accuracy and potential wider application to other plant communities of Vesta visual fuel assessments has received limited attention. The Great Western Woodlands (GWW) region of south-western Australia supports the world’s largest remaining area of Mediterranean-climate woodland, which in mosaic with mallee, shrublands and salt lakes cover an area of 160 000 km2. Eucalyptus woodlands in this region are typically fire-sensitive, and fire return intervals recorded over recent decades have been much shorter than the long-term average. This has led to considerable conservation concern regarding the loss of mature woodlands, and has highlighted a need to better understand how fuel and vegetation flammability changes with time since fire. We visually assessed fuels using Vesta methods across 24 sites in a multi-century (10 to 260+ years since fire) time-since-fire sequence derived from growth ring-size relationships in fire-sensitive Eucalyptus salubris (gimlet) woodlands.
  • vegetation structure
  • ecological fire management
  • fire interval
  • Mediterranean-type ecosystem
  • project Vesta
  • space-for-time
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  1  
Published
2014-05-27
 
Last updated
2014-11-21
 
docid
lloyd.648.2

Gosper; Prober; Yates

Science and Conservation Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife and CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; Science and Conservation Division, Department of Parks and Wildlife

Weather Station Data, Flux Tower Site, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2012
Prober; Macfarlane
CSIRO Ecosystem Science
Weather station records global solar radiation at 3m, mean wind speed, gust speed and wind direction at 3m, air temperature and relative humidity at 3m, and rainfall at 0.5m
  • weather station
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • 0401
  2  
Published
2015-12-14
 
Last updated
2016-10-05
 
docid
supersite.526.3

Prober; Macfarlane

CSIRO Ecosystem Science

Weather Station Data, Flux Tower Site, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2013
Prober; Macfarlane
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Half-hourly weather station records 4 channel radiation and net radiation at 36m, mean wind speed and wind direction at 36m, air temperature and relative humidity at 36m, atmospheric pressure at 36m, ground heat flux at -8cm, and rainfall at 0.5m.
  • weather station
  • solar radiation
  • temperature
  • climate
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2016-03-03
 
Last updated
2016-03-03
 
docid
supersite.587.4

Prober; Macfarlane

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Weather Station Data, Flux Tower Site, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2014
Prober; Macfarlane
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Half-hourly weather station records 4 channel radiation and net radiation at 36m, mean wind speed and wind direction at 36m, air temperature and relative humidity at 36m, atmospheric pressure at 36m, ground heat flux at -8cm, and rainfall at 0.5m.
  • weather station
  • solar radiation
  • temperature
  • climate
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2016-03-03
 
Last updated
2016-03-03
 
docid
supersite.589.4

Prober; Macfarlane

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Weather Station Data, Flux Tower Site, Great Western Woodlands SuperSite, 2015
Prober; Macfarlane
CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences
Half-hourly weather station records 4 channel radiation and net radiation at 36m, mean wind speed and wind direction at 36m, air temperature and relative humidity at 36m, atmospheric pressure at 36m, ground heat flux at -8cm, and rainfall at 0.5m.
  • weather station
  • solar radiation
  • temperature
  • climate
  • GWW
  • Great Western Woodlands
  • 0401
  1  
Published
2016-03-03
 
Last updated
2016-03-03
 
docid
supersite.585.5

Prober; Macfarlane

CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences